Mark Johnson

Mark Johnson
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign | UIUC

Doctor of Philosophy
I work with the US Army Corps of Engineers and the University of Illinois to conserve endangered species with eDNA

About

5
Publications
1,076
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
48
Citations
Introduction
I am broadly interested in the detection of rare and invasive species and how they impact the ecology of native systems. In particular, my work focuses on environmental DNA (eDNA)detection and how we can use eDNA for conservation and to shed light on invasive species. I have worked with aquatic, sediment, and airborne eDNA to try and detect spices of interest.
Additional affiliations
May 2022 - present
US Army Corps of Engineers
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2015 - March 2022
Texas Tech University
Position
  • Graduate Student
September 2014 - December 2014
K&L Plating Company
Position
  • Chemistry Intern
Description
  • As a chemistry intern I ensured the plating baths had the right concentrations and any waste was properly disposed of and had the correct requirements for the Pennsylvania Environmental Protection Agency.
Education
August 2017 - May 2021
Texas Tech University
Field of study
  • Natural Resource Management
May 2015 - August 2017
Texas Tech University
Field of study
  • Natural Resource Management
September 2011 - May 2015
Millersville University
Field of study
  • Biology-Environmental Science

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Full-text available
Background Airborne environmental DNA (eDNA) research is an emerging field that focuses on the detection of species from their genetic remnants in the air. The majority of studies into airborne eDNA of plants has until now either focused on single species detection, specifically only pollen, or human health impacts, with no previous studies surveyi...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research on environmental DNA (eDNA), genetic material shed by organisms into their environment that can be used for sensitive and species-specific detection, has focused on the ability to collect airborne eDNA released by plants and carried by the wind for use in terrestrial plant populations, including detection of invasive and endangered...
Article
In Texas, mesquite and yellow-bluestem invasions are widespread. Identifying and monitoring juvenile and adult plants using high-resolution imagery from airborne sensors while they colonize new areas across the landscape can help land managers prioritize locations for treatment and eradication. In this study, we evaluated how data collection design...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic analysis of airborne plant material has historically focused (generally implicitly rather than as a stated goal) on pollen from anemophilous (wind-pollinated) species, such as in multiple studies examining the relationship of allergens to human health. Inspired by the recent influx of literature applying environmental DNA (eDNA) approaches...
Article
Full-text available
Airborne environmental DNA (eDNA) research has typically focused on the detection of pollen from anemophilous terrestrial plant species; however, recent findings have expanded the definition of airborne eDNA to include a variety of eDNA sources, such as leaf and flower fragments. While methods for capturing pollen are well studied, there is less kn...

Network

Cited By