Mark Hunter

Mark Hunter
University of Toronto | U of T · Department of Geography

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39
Publications
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (39)
Article
This paper considers an apparent paradox in South Africa: the share of single‐person households increased after the end of apartheid despite the ending of apartheid's racial laws that restricted ‘African’ families from living together, the postapartheid state's building of around four‐million low‐cost houses for families, the economies of scale off...
Article
This article addresses the dramatic rise in the illicit use of Xanax, an anti-anxiety medication, among South African school learners from roughly the mid 2010s. Based on interviews conducted in secondary schools in Durban, I argue for the importance of locating the benzodiazepine in relation to other known drugs that include cannabis, heroin, alco...
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The term ‘ amaphara ’, possibly derived from ‘parasites’, burst into South African public culture in the 2010s to refer to petty thieves addicted to a heroin-based drug locally called whoonga/nyaope . Drawing on ethnography and media sources to interrogate the rise of ‘amaphara’, this paper argues that South Africa's heroin epidemic magnifies the a...
Article
Many policy interventions designed to achieve gender equality in education are predicated on the assumption that the enforcement of a human rights framework will promote equality and reduce (gender) inequalities. In South Africa, the ending of apartheid led to the introduction of a rights-based constitution in 1996. In line with this Constitution t...
Article
This article sets out a political economic framework to understand South Africa’s dramatic upsurge in heroin use in the 2000s. Drawing on interviews with users and their families, it shows how the opioid gained influence among men in their twenties living in apartheid-engineered townships marked by chronic unemployment. Giving particular attention...
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In this study, we revisit the status of English relative to the African languages in South Africa by analysing new national data on the main language spoken outside the home. These data, which derive from the General Household Surveys of 2017 and 2018, complement commonly collected data on the main language spoken within the home. Our analysis show...
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Geographical concepts have been widely and effectively employed to understand the imposition of market principles on schooling systems. This article brings this literature into tension with critical race theory and specifically David Goldberg’s analysis of “racial neoliberalism” that foregrounds the constitutive role of race in marketization. It be...
Book
Following the end of apartheid in 1994, the ANC government placed education at the centre of its plans to build a nonracial and more equitable society. Yet, by the 2010s a wave of student protests voiced demands for decolonised and affordable education. By following families and schools in Durban for nearly a decade, Mark Hunter sheds new light on...
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Some 65 years ago Radcliffe-Brown wrote that marriage is “not an event or a condition but a developing process.” This position became modified two decades later when John Comaroff and Simon Roberts demonstrated the ambiguity of the process of marriage in order to challenge the dominant “jural” view. This article argues that these insights still hol...
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From the 1980s and 1990s, governments around the world began to champion ‘parental choice’ over schooling. Much of the existing scholarship has been based on examples taken from the global North. In such settings, where nuclear families are common, a major theme has been the privileged educational strategies and outcomes of middle-class families. Y...
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After decades of entrenched racial discrimination, virtually all South African children today enter the schooling system, and many progress further than did their parents. Yet the increased importance of fees at the best schools means that a child’s schooling and subsequent life chances depend, in new ways, on the efforts of others, usually family...
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Over the last decade, one of the most influential explanations for high HIV prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa is the existence of sexual networks characterised by concurrent partners. Recently, however, a growing number of scholars have challenged the evidential basis for the concurrency argument. While this dispute has led to a call for more sophis...
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‘High apartheid’ in the 1960s was marked by intensified efforts to redraw urban areas along racial lines and quash black South Africans' schooling and employment ambitions. The 1953 Bantu Education Act became infamous for limiting African educational opportunities. Yet this article shows how women in Umlazi Township, outside of Durban, schooled the...
Article
Realising the Dream is a powerful and much needed monograph that adds significantly to what is still a relatively small number of book-length studies of education in South Africa. At its heart, the book brings a detailed examination of educational desegregation into tension with a theoretically rich study of ‘race’. Soudien is intensely critical of...
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Against a backdrop of declining manufacturing employment, this article uses a study of the call center industry to argue that English language proficiency is central to new service jobs in post-apartheid South Africa. Drawing on research in Durban, we in this study show that access to call center work—especially the highest paid niches—is heavily m...
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This paper reviews Christel Lane's Industry and Society in Europe, a comparative study of industrial change in Britain, Germany and France. Three areas covered by the book are discussed in a South African context: flexible specialisation theory; industrial relations; and the relationship between finance and industry. The paper assesses the relevanc...
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Government policy towards informal settlements in south africa reflects a tension between two approaches: recognizing the legitimacy of informal settlements and aggressively removing these so-called “slums”.(1) drawing on nationally representative household survey data and interviews with 25 individuals relocated from an informal settlement to a “t...
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In April 2009, African National Congress leader Jacob Zuma was swept into power in South Africa's fourth democratic general election. To date, this political “Zunami” has largely been presented as either a leftist rebellion against Mbeki's neoliberalism, a reassertion of patriarchal “traditionalism”, or an example of Zulu ethnic mobilization. This...
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Much research on racial desegregation in South Africa uses residential data to track how richer black South Africans are moving from apartheid spaces to higher income suburbs; how racial privilege is giving way to class privilege. Drawing on geographers’ relational conception of space and anthropologist Sherry Ortner’s notion of a ‘class project’,...
Book
In some parts of South Africa, more than one in three people are HIV positive. Love in the Time of AIDS explores transformations in notions of gender and intimacy to try to understand the roots of this virulent epidemic. By living in an informal settlement and collecting love letters, cell phone text messages, oral histories, and archival materials...
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This article begins by noting the contribution that past South African writings on health can make to the field of health geography-especially writings on male migration and syphilis from the 1940s that conceptualized space as relational. However, the second part of the article notes that the rapid rise of AIDS in the post-apartheid period influenc...
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This chapter draws on historical and ethnographic material from the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal to show how economic changes have shaped and reshaped the negotiation of affect and exchange. It reviews the changing ways in which men have “provided love” in South Africa as love became embroiled with vastly different forms of male assistan...
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Between 1990 and 2005, HIV prevalence rates in South Africa jumped from less than 1% to around 29%. Important scholarship has demonstrated how racialized structures entrenched by colonialism and apartheid set the scene for the rapid unfolding of the AIDS pandemic, like other causes of ill-health before it. Of particular relevance is the legacy of c...
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Drawing from ethnographic, archival and secondary research, this article examines multiple-sexual partners in historical perspective in KwaZulu-Natal, a South Africa province where one in three people are thought to be HIV positive. Research on masculinities, multiple partners, and AIDS has been predominantly directed towards the present day. This...
Article
In its first year of broadcast, 2002, the TV show All You Need is Love regularly attracted 2 million viewers in South Africa. The programme centres on the delivery of messages of love and the recording of recipients' responses: "Lost Love, Long Distance Love, Unrequited Love, Looking for Love, Fragile Love, Forgotten Love, Star Crossed Lovers…you n...
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TRANSFORMATION 54 (2004) ISSN 0258-7696 123 Article Masculinities, multiple-sexual-partners, and AIDS: the making and unmaking of Isoka in KwaZulu-Natal Mark Hunter1 Courting behaviour among traditional young men is a very important part of their education; for a young man must achieve the distinction of being an isoka, ie a Don Juan or a Casanova....
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Full-text available
In this article, a review of both the labour implications of post-Fordist work organization and the formulation of industrial policy in South Africa will provide the context for a detailed case study of working conditions in a firm that adopted JMTs (also, as a system, called Lean Production). Through this case study, the article asks: 'how high is...

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