Mark Stephen Harvey

Mark Stephen Harvey
Western Australian Museum · Collections & Research

PhD

About

467
Publications
161,651
Reads
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7,919
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2005 - present
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
March 1989 - present
Government of Western Australia
Position
  • Head of Department

Publications

Publications (467)
Article
Full-text available
The golden trapdoor spider genus Euoplos Rainbow, 1914 is endemic to Australia, and currently contains 23 species. In eastern Australia, the genus is known to occur from southern Victoria to the Cape York Peninsula of northern Queensland, however, all described species in the genus are from the southern part of this distribution– all species north...
Article
The open-holed trapdoor spider genus Aname L. Koch, 1873 is endemic to Australia, and currently contains 46 named species. We describe two new species from southern Australia: Aname elegans sp. nov. from the Gawler bioregion of South Australia and Aname pulchella sp. nov. from the Mallee and Hampton bioregions of southern Western Australia.
Article
Full-text available
The pseudoscorpion (Arachnida: Pseudoscorpiones) fauna of mainland Ecuador, excluding the Galápagos Islands, is poorly known, with only 41 described species in 9 families. The family Syarinidae has a pantropical distribution and presently comprises ca 120 species in 17 valid genera that are found in leaf litter and subterranean habitats, mostly in...
Article
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With this paper we introduce the Australian Journal of Taxonomy and outline its scope, rationale, workflow and governance. The journal is published by Taxonomy Australia, a national collaboration by the Australian taxonomic community. Australian Journal of Taxonomy is one of the world's first fully-online journals. Papers are born-digital and born-...
Article
The World Arachnida Catalog (WAC, online at https://wac.nmbe.ch) is introduced as an amalgamation of the highly successful World Spider Catalog (WSC), the Pseudoscorpions of the World Catalog, and the Smaller Arachnid Order Catalogs. The new catalogs present all available taxonomic information on eight arachnid orders (Amblypygi, Araneae, Pseudosco...
Article
Scorpions constitute a charismatic lineage of arthropods and comprise more than 2500 described species. Found throughout various tropical and temperate habitats, these predatory arachnids have a long evolutionary history, with a fossil record that began in the Silurian. While all scorpions are venomous, the asymmetrically diverse family Buthidae ha...
Article
Full-text available
Deciphering the evolutionary relationships of Chelicerata (arachnids, horseshoe crabs, and allied taxa) has proven notoriously difficult, due to their ancient rapid radiation and the incidence of elevated evolutionary rates in several lineages. While conflicting hypotheses prevail in morphological and molecular datasets alike, the monophyly of Arac...
Article
Full-text available
The name “millipede” translates to a thousand feet (from mille “thousand” and pes “foot”). However, no millipede has ever been described with more than 750 legs. We discovered a new record-setting species of millipede with 1,306 legs, Eumillipes persephone , from Western Australia. This diminutive animal (0.95 mm wide, 95.7 mm long) has 330 segment...
Article
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The modification of male pedipalps into secondary sexual intromittent organs is one of the hallmark characteristics of spiders, yet understanding the development and evolution of male genitalia across the order remains a challenging prospect. The embolus – the sclerite bearing the efferent spermatic duct or spermophor, and used to deliver sperm dir...
Article
Pseudoscorpions have a sparse fossil record although they are among the oldest terrestrial lineages with origins that go back to the Devonian (ca. 385 Ma). Amongst the 25 extant families of pseudoscorpions, only 14 are known from fossils, most of which are preserved in European ambers from the Eocene. Burmese amber from the Cenomanian (mid-Cretaceo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Deciphering the evolutionary relationships of Chelicerata (arachnids, horseshoe crabs, and allied taxa) has proven notoriously difficult, due to their ancient rapid radiation and the incidence of elevated evolutionary rates in several lineages. While conflicting hypotheses prevail in morphological and molecular datasets alike, the monophyly of Arac...
Article
Full-text available
Australia is in the midst of an extinction crisis, having already lost 10% of terrestrial mammal fauna since European settlement and with hundreds of other species at high risk of extinction. The decline of the nation's biota is a result of an array of threatening processes; however, a comprehensive taxon-specific understanding of threats and their...
Article
The assembly of the Australian arid zone biota has long fascinated biogeographers. Covering over two-thirds of the continent, Australia’s vast arid zone biome is home to a distinctive fauna and flora, including numerous lineages which have diversified since the Eocene. Tracing the origins and speciation history of these arid zone taxa has been an o...
Article
Full-text available
Pseudoscorpions are amongst the oldest terrestrial lineages but there is a major gap in the fossil record between the oldest fossils from the Devonian (ca. 385 million years ago) and rich fossil communities in amber that mostly originate from the Eocene of Europe. Burmese/Myanmar amber (or Burmite) from the middle Cretaceous preserves a diverse com...
Article
Full-text available
Long-branch attraction is a systematic artifact that results in erroneous groupings of fast-evolving taxa. The combination of short, deep internodes in tandem with LBA artifacts has produced empirically intractable parts of the Tree of Life. One such group is the arthropod subphylum Chelicerata, whose backbone phylogeny has remained unstable despit...
Preprint
Full-text available
Long-branch attraction is a systematic artifact that results in erroneous groupings of fast-evolving taxa. The combination of short, deep internodes in tandem with LBA artifacts has produced empirically intractable parts of the Tree of Life. One such group is the arthropod subphylum Chelicerata, whose backbone phylogeny has remained unstable despit...
Preprint
Full-text available
Scorpions constitute a charismatic lineage of arthropods and comprise more than 2,500 described species. Found throughout various tropical and temperate habitats, these predatory arachnids have a long evolutionary history, with a fossil record that began in the Silurian. While all scorpions are venomous, the asymmetrically diverse family Buthidae h...
Article
Full-text available
Genus-group names for animals established after 1930 must, according to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, be accompanied by the designation of a valid type species. We have found several genus-group names of Arachnida described after 1930 that were not validly formed and, while the type species were subsequently designated in mains...
Article
The schizomid fauna of mainland Australia currently comprises 60 species within seven named genera, of which five are endemic to the continent: Attenuizomus Harvey, 2000, Brignolizomus Harvey, 2000, Draculoides Harvey, 1992, Julattenius Harvey, 1992, Notozomus Harvey, 2000. Most Australian schizomids have been described from eastern and northern Au...
Article
The D’Aguilar Range of subtropical south-eastern Queensland (Australia), harbours an upland rainforest biota characterised by high levels of endemic diversity. Following recent phylogenetic and biogeographic research into the open-holed trapdoor spiders of the genus Namea Raven, 1984 (family Anamidae), remarkable levels of sympatry for a single gen...
Article
The open-holed trapdoor spider genus Aname L. Koch is widely distributed across mainland Australia and Tasmania, and currently includes 34 named species. Many species are poorly known, and their descriptions based on female type material only render their identification difficult, as the best taxonomic characters are usually found on the adult male...
Article
Full-text available
The pseudoscorpion genus Synsphyronus is widely distributed in the Australasian region, with 30 species described from Australia and two from New Zealand. This paper describes the first species to be recorded from New Caledonia: S. platnickisp. nov. Two of the three nymphal stages, tritonymph and protonymph, are described, as well as the adults.
Article
Full-text available
The pseudoscorpions of the genus Garypus L. Koch are restricted to seashore habitats where they occupy supralittoral and littoral zones primarily in tropical and subtropical areas. Few species have been recorded from the Indo-West Pacific region, and this project was devised to produce a review of the species found in museum collections and to test...
Article
The tropical and subtropical rainforests of Australia’s eastern mesic zone have given rise to a complex and highly diverse biota. Numerous old endemic, niche-conserved groups persist in the montane rainforests south of Cooktown, where concepts of serial allopatric speciation resulting from the formation of xeric interzones have largely driven our b...
Article
Compared with araneomorph spiders, relatively few mygalomorph spiders have evolved an obligate existence in subterranean habitats. The trapdoor spider genus Troglodiplura Main, 1969 and its sole named species T. lowryi Main, 1969 is endemic to caves on the Nullarbor Plain of southern Australia, and is one of the world’s most troglomorphic mygalomor...
Article
The formation of the Australian arid zone, Australia's largest and youngest major biome, has been recognized as a major driver of rapid evolutionary radiations in terrestrial plants and animals. Here, we investigate the phylogenetic diversity and evolutionary history of subterranean short-tailed whip scorpions (Schizomida: Hubbardiidae), which are...
Article
The open-holed trapdoor spiders of the genus Teyl Main, 1975 from the Pilbara bioregion of Western Australia are investigated. A single endemic species from the southern Pilbara, T. heuretes sp. nov., is newly described, representing the northern-most occurrence of the genus in Australia. Legacy molecular data for Australian Nemesiidae, along with...
Article
The south-western division of Australia is the only biodiversity hotspot in Australia and is well-known for extreme levels of local endemism. Climate change has been identified as a key threat for flora and fauna, but very few data are presently available to evaluate its impact on invertebrate fauna. Here, we derive a molecular phylogeography for p...
Article
Full-text available
The goblin spider genus Cinetomorpha Simon is removed from the synonymy of Gamasomorpha Karsch and treated as the senior synonym of Yumates Chamberlin and Lucetia Dumitresco & Georgesco. All 41 species occur only in the New World, and the genus is divided into four species groups: the simplex group, the puberula group, the patquiana group and the i...
Article
Full-text available
The species of the millipede genus Antichiropus Attems, 1911 found in the Pilbara region of Western Australia are reviewed, and 33 new species are described. The new species are: A. anguinus Car, n. sp., A. antius Car, n. sp., A. apricus Car, n. sp., A. cirratus Car, n. sp., A. confragus Car, n. sp., A. cristatus Car, n. sp., A. cucumeraceous Car,...
Article
Subterranean environments contain a diverse and unique obligate fauna: either aquatic living in the groundwater or terrestrial living in voids above the water table. In the arid region of the western part of the Australian continent, a particularly rich subterranean fauna coincides with a concentration of natural resource extraction operations. Sin...
Article
The pseudoscorpion genus IndogarypusBeier, 1957 is reviewed and its characters are discussed. Based on the review of these characteristics Indogarypus is synonymized with Geogarypus Chamberlin, 1930. New descriptions of Geogarypus indicus (Beier, 1930), G. ceylonicusBeier, 1973 and G. nepalensis Beier, 1974 are provided.
Article
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The pseudoscorpion genus CoprochernesBeier, 1976 currently includes two species from Central America. The type species, C. costaricensisBeier, 1976, was collected from mammal dung in Costa Rica. A restudy of the type specimens reveals that it has all of the salient morphological features of the genus NeoallochernesHoff, 1947, including only four se...
Article
A new species of the pseudoscorpion genus Metawithius Chamberlin, 1931 is described from Kerala, India. Detailed morphological descriptions, diagnostic features and illustrations of Metawithius keralensis Johnson, Mathew, Sebastian & Joseph, sp. nov. are provided. Detailed redescription and illustrations of M. nepalensis (Beier, 1974) are also prov...
Article
The pseudoscorpion genus Verrucachernes Chamberlin, 1947 is widely distributed in the Old World tropics, with three named Australasian and West Pacific species and two from Africa. A review of some pseudoscorpions described from India has revealed that Withius parvus Beier, 1930 (currently in the genus Metawithius) and Pselaphochernes indicus Beier...
Article
Full-text available
Modern taxonomy and systematics profit from an invaluable tool that has been developed in the course of more than a century by intense discussions and negotiations of generations of zoologists and palaeontologists: The International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN 1999, 2012). The main goal of the Code is “to promote stability and universalit...
Article
In Australia, climate change and continental drift have given rise to a complex biota comprising mesic specialists, arid-adapted lineages, and taxa that have arrived on the continent from Asia. We explore the phylogenetic diversity and biogeographic history of the Australian trapdoor spider genus Conothele Thorell, 1878 that is widespread in Austra...
Article
Full-text available
A combined molecular and morphological approach was used to revise the Australian spiny trapdoor spiders of the genus Blakistonia Hogg. Where possible, our molecular approach used sequence data from the COI barcoding gene, which were analysed using Bayesian, RAxML and neighbour-joining approaches. These molecular data were combined with morphology...
Article
Full-text available
The aganippine spiny trapdoor spiders of the genus Gaius Rainbow, 1914 are revised. Seven new species are described from Western Australia: G. aurora sp. nov., G. austini sp. nov., G. cooperi sp. nov., G. hueyi sp. nov., G. humphreysi sp. nov., G. mainae sp. nov. and G. tealei sp. nov. The type species, G. villosus Rainbow, 1914, is re-illustrated...
Article
Full-text available
The Australian schizomid fauna consists of eight genera distributed across the northern half of the country, and are mostly restricted to rainforest or subterranean ecosystems. Several schizomid species have been previously described from the arid Pilbara bioregion of Western Australia, occurring in subterranean cavities that are accessible only by...
Article
Spiders of the nemesiid mygalomorph subfamily Anaminae are common in the Australasian region from rainforests to deserts. Using specimens from all 12 named genera, we evaluated anamine phylogeny and classification using a multi-locus molecular dataset. We combined newly obtained 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA and elongation factor 1 gamma (EF-1γ) sequen...
Article
‘Slow science’ approaches to understanding the ecology, natural history and demography of species have declined over recent decades, despite the critical importance of these studies to conservation biology. With the progression of the Anthropocene, populations of invertebrates are under increasing pressure across the globe, yet few long‐term datase...
Chapter
Life on earth consists of a wondrous array of organisms, from bacteria and viruses, to redwoods and whales. But it’s the invertebrates – those animals without a backbone – that have diversified most notably. Wilson (1987) called them the ‘little things that run the world’ and made a call to arms to bring invertebrate conservation to the forefront o...
Article
Full-text available
The aganippine spiny trapdoor spiders of the genus Bungulla Rix, Main, Raven & Harvey are revised, and 30 new species are described from Western Australia: B. ajana sp. nov., B. aplini sp. nov., B. banksia sp. nov., B. bella sp. nov., B. bidgemia sp. nov., B. biota sp. nov., B. bringo sp. nov., B. burbidgei sp. nov., B. dipsodes sp. nov., B. disrup...
Article
Full-text available
Despite progress in recent decades, the conservation management of insects and allied invertebrates in Australia is challenging and remains a formidable task against a background of poor taxonomic and biological knowledge, limited resources (funds and scientific expertise) and a relatively low level of community engagement, education and awareness....
Article
Transcriptomic and genomic analyses have illuminated the diversity of venoms in three of the four venomous arachnid orders (scorpions, spiders, and ticks). To date, no venom gland transcriptome analysis has been available for pseudoscorpions, the fourth venomous arachnid lineage. To redress this gap, we sequenced an mRNA library generated from the...
Article
The aganippine shield-backed trapdoor spiders of the monophyletic nigrum -group of Idiosoma Ausserer s. l. are revised, and 15 new species are described from Western Australia and the Eyre Peninsula of South Australia: I.arenaceum Rix & Harvey, sp. n. , I.corrugatum Rix & Harvey, sp. n. , I.clypeatum Rix & Harvey, sp. n. , I.dandaragan Rix & Harvey...