Mark Colley

Mark Colley
Ulm University | UULM · Institute of Media Informatics

Master of Science

About

48
Publications
4,103
Reads
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357
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2019 - present
Ulm University
Position
  • Research Associate
October 2015 - March 2019
Airbus
Position
  • Software Engineer
Education
October 2015 - August 2018
Ulm University
Field of study
  • Computer Science

Publications

Publications (48)
Article
The inclusion of in-vehicle sensors and increased intention and state recognition capabilities enable implicit in-vehicle interaction. Starting from a systematic literature review (SLR) on implicit in-vehicle interaction, which resulted in 82 publications, we investigated state and intention recognition methods based on (1) their used modalities, (...
Article
With the future availability of highly automated vehicles (AVs), vulnerable road users (VRUs) will encounter vehicles without human operators. To compensate for the lack of eye contact, realizing communication via external human-machine interfaces (eHMIs) is planned. The adequacy of this regarding people with intellectual disabilities (IDs) is, how...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Automated vehicles should improve both traffic safety and user experience. While novel behavior patterns such as platooning become feasible to reduce fuel usage, such time-and fuel-reducing behavior at intersections can be perceived as unsafe and possibly disconcert users. Therefore, we designed and implemented nine feedback strategies for a simula...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Automated vehicles will change the interaction with the user drastically. While freeing the user of the driving task for most of the journey, the "final 100 meters problem", directing the vehicle to the final parking spot, could require human intervention. Therefore, we present a classification of interaction concepts for automated vehicles based o...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Automated vehicles are expected to substitute or even improve driver-driver communication, for example, via LED strips or displays. Numerous situations exist where ambiguities have to be resolved via gestures or implicit communication (i.e., movement). An already demanding situation is the unsignalized four-way intersection. Additionally, Vehicle-T...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Infrastructure-mounted sensors that monitor roads can provide essential information for manual drivers and automated vehicles, e.g., positions of other vehicles occluded by buildings. However, human drivers and passengers have to trust and accept their use. This raises the question of how trust can be increased in such a scenario. One important fac...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Investigating trust, acceptance, and attitudes towards automated driving is often investigated in simulator experiments. Therefore, behavioral validity is a crucial aspect of automated driving studies. However, static simulators have reduced behavioral validity because of their inherent safe environment. We propose VAMPIRE (VR automated movement pl...
Article
Automated vehicles are expected to communicate with pedestrians at least during the introductory phase, for example, via LED strips, displays, or loudspeakers. While these are added to minimize confusion and increase trust, the human passenger within the vehicle could perform motions that a pedestrian could misinterpret as opposing the vehicle’s co...
Article
Full-text available
Automotive user interfaces constantly change due to increasing automation, novel features, additional applications, and user demands. While in-vehicle interaction can utilize numerous promising modalities, no existing overview includes an extensive set of human sensors and actuators and interaction locations throughout the vehicle interior. We cond...
Article
Full-text available
The successful introduction of automated vehicles (AVs) depends on the user's acceptance. To gain acceptance, the intended user must trust the technology, which itself relies on an appropriate understanding. Visualizing internal processes could aid in this. For example, the functional hierarchy of autonomous vehicles distinguishes between perceptio...
Article
Automated vehicles are expected to require some form of communication (e.g., via LED strip or display) with vulnerable road users such as pedestrians. However, the passenger inside the automated vehicle could perform gestures or motions which could potentially be interpreted by the pedestrian as contradictory to the outside communication of the car...
Article
Full-text available
Automated trucks for long-distance journeys seem within reach. With such automation, no human driver could be available. However, the last mile of the delivery is likely to involve humans. Therefore, either a human driver should still be present, or construction site workers must interact with the automated truck. While automated trucks capable of...
Preprint
The automation of the driving task affects both the primary driving task and the automotive user interfaces. The liberation of user interface space and cognitive load on the driver allows for new ways to think about driving. Related work showed that activities such as sleeping, watching TV, or working will become more prevalent in the future. Howev...
Article
Autonomous vehicles provide new input modalities to improve interaction with in-vehicle information systems. However, due to the road and driving conditions, the user input can be perturbed, resulting in reduced interaction quality. One challenge is assessing the vehicle motion effects on the interaction without an expensive high-fidelity simulator...
Article
Passengers of automated vehicles will likely engage in non-driving related activities like reading and, therefore, be disengaged from the driving task. However, especially in critical situations such as unexpected pedestrian crossings, it can be assumed that passengers request information about the vehicle's intention and an explanation. Some conce...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Prosocial Behavior" means cooperating and acting in a way to benefit others. Since more and more diverse road users (such as electronic bicycles, scooters, etc.) but also vehicles at different levels of automation are sharing the safety-critical road environment, acting prosocial will become increasingly important in the future for both human and a...
Article
Full-text available
Automated driving in urban environments not only has the potential to improve traffic flow and heighten driver comfort but also to increase traffic safety, particularly for vulnerable road users such as pedestrians. For these benefits to take effect, drivers need to trust and use automated vehicles. This decision is influenced by both system and co...
Preprint
Full-text available
Automated vehicles can implement strategies to drive with optimized fuel efficiency. Therefore, automated driving is seen as a major advancement in tackling climate change. However, with automated vehicles driving in cities and other areas rife with other road users such as human drivers, pedestrians, or cyclists, there is the potential for "stop-a...
Conference Paper
Automated vehicles are expected to become a part of the road traffic in the near future. This upcoming change raises concerns on how human road users, e.g., cyclists or pedestrians, would interact with them to ensure safe communication on the road. Previous work focused primarily on the scenario in which a young adult without impairments crosses a...
Conference Paper
People with vision impairments (VIP) are among the most vulnerable road users in traffic. Autonomous vehicles are believed to reduce accidents but still demand some form of external communication signaling relevant information to pedestrians. Recent research on the design of vehicle-pedestrian communication (VPC) focuses strongly on concepts for a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The traffic system is a complex network with numerous individuals (e.g., drivers, cyclists, and pedestrians) and vehicles involved. Road systems vary in various aspects such as the number of lanes, right of way, and configuration. With the emergence of autonomous vehicles, this system will change. Research has already addressed the missing communic...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Autonomous vehicles are about to enter the mass market and with it a complex socio-technical system including vulnerable road users such as pedestrians and cyclists. Communication from autonomous vehicles to vulnerable road users can ease the introduction of and aids in understanding the intention of these. Various modalities and messages to commun...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In the emerging research field of external communication of autonomous vehicles with vulnerable road users (e.g. pedestrians), there is no agreed upon set of methods to design and evaluate concepts. The approaches vary from pure paper-based design studies over Virtual or Augmented Reality simulation to real-world testing of early prototypes. While...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
People with impairments are among the most vulnerable road users in traffic with significantly higher risk of accidents. Upcoming autonomous vehicles are expected to reduce this but demand some form of external communication to be able to signal their intent or other information to pedestrians. Recent research around the design of vehicle-pedestria...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Highly automated driving evolves steadily and even gradually enters public roads. Nevertheless, there remain driving-related tasks that can be handled more efficiently by humans. Cooperation with the human user on a higher abstraction level of the dynamic driving task has been suggested to overcome operational boundaries. This cooperation includes...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The role and respective tasks of human drivers are changing due to the introduction of automation in driving. Full automation, where the driver is only a passenger, is still far-off. Consequently, both academia and industry investigate how the interaction between automated vehicles and their drivers could look like and how responsibilities could be...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In the emerging field of automated vehicles (AVs), the many recent advancements coincide with different areas of system limitations. The recognition of objects like traffic signs or traffic lights is still challenging, especially under bad weather conditions or when traffic signs are partially occluded. A common approach to deal with system boundar...
Conference Paper
When player skill levels are not matched, games provide an unsatisfying player experience. Player balancing is used across many digital game genres to address this, but has not been studied for co-located augmented reality (AR) tabletop games, where using boosts and handicaps can adjust for different player skill levels. In the setting of an AR tab...

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