Mark Alan Christie

Mark Alan Christie
University of Cumbria · Institute of Health

PhD
Currently researching into open water swimmers' experiences with an ethnographic study in North England.

About

13
Publications
2,692
Reads
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39
Citations
Citations since 2016
11 Research Items
37 Citations
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Introduction
Mark works at the Institute for Health, University of Cumbria. Mark’s research interests include Green & Blue Exercise, Physical Activity Interventions and Sports Development. Mark completed his PhD by Published Works – which includes six peer reviewed papers - in July 2022. Mark is currently researching open water swimmers’ experiences, and has just finished a £75k funded project investigating the utility of therapeutic horticulture and agriculture with young people excluded from education.

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
This paper aims to add to the fledgling body of work pertaining to the cardio-vascular benefits of self-motivated activity in naturalistic settings. Collecting results from a longitudinal study of a regional community conservation intervention in the UK, it is found that - across a wide range of age groups – simple engagement with a set of everyday...
Article
Full-text available
This paper, utilizing a qualitative methodology, offers further insight into the concept of restorative natural environments by investigating the experiences of five retired and semi-retired volunteers (mean age 65.6 years) involved with a community conservation-themed project in an urban park in the north of England, United Kingdom. The volunteers...
Article
Full-text available
This study was designed to explore the efficacy of a horticultural therapy intervention for the enhancement of subjective health and wellbeing in male service users with a dual diagnosis of personality disorder and intellectual disability in a medium secure unit in the north of England, UK. Service users (n=7) were involved in three focus groups; o...
Article
Full-text available
An increasingly robust evidence base supports the therapeutic value of nature on mental health and wellbeing. The rise in reported mental ill-health across the world has major implications for the effective use of healthcare budgets, as well as economic consequences. Health practitioners may need to consider going beyond traditional mental health s...
Thesis
Full-text available
In recent years there has been considerable reporting of a range of physical and psycho-social benefits derived from ‘green exercise’, a term which describes a myriad of nature-based activities, including gardening, walking, climbing, and running in natural surroundings. Extant literature has largely focused upon exploring these benefits in respect...
Article
Full-text available
Whilst many young people are thriving, some find home and/or school life challenging. English schools are facing unprecedented challenges in meeting needs of young people with ever-diminishing resources (Mind, 2022). The World Health Organization (WHO, 2021) states adolescents with mental health conditions are particularly vulnerable to social excl...
Research
Full-text available
Critical evaluation of a novel 'think aloud' method within an ethnographic fieldwork research design - reflections on its utility for investigating the impact of a green exercise therapeutic horticulture initiative for people recovering from mental ill-health.
Preprint
Full-text available
Workplace health is becoming a major consideration for employers, not simply due to ongoing legislative requirements from a health and safety perspective, but because of the business-related costs resulting from ill health at work-with lost productivity, absenteeism, presenteeism, low morale, damage to reputation and reductions in turnover all detr...
Presentation
Full-text available
Presentation on three research papers utilising specific forms of 'green exercise', specifically gardening, horticulture and conservation work. Each involved different populations (mental health self-referrals; open access community project; medium secure unit service users) and settings (woodland, urban park, NHS garden).
Presentation
Full-text available
Overview of green exercise projects using specific modalities: gardening, horticulture, conservation with different population groups and in different settings.

Network

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
This action-research, rapid ethnographic project aims to improve health and care services for young people across North East & North Cumbria (NENC) through an exploration of the efficacy of therapeutic horticulture (TH) and therapeutic agriculture (TA) interventions with young people at risk of exclusion and educational failure. Objectives are to: • identify/articulate each partner organisation’s theory of change. • identify any impact of the projects on young people’s wellbeing and educational outcomes. • identify how and why these impacts may occur (mediating and moderating factors) • establish a long-term sustainable evaluation methodology for each organisation (incorporating activity, process, and outcomes evaluation) • publish a NENC guide to young people’s TH and TA to share learning for wider project/service development. • pilot this approach to enable a full NIHR grant application for a subsequent national level study. • This project will explore how therapeutic horticulture (TH) and therapeutic agriculture (TA) might offer better care for vulnerable young people who are at risk of educational failure and later negative outcomes.