Mark Antoniou

Mark Antoniou
Western Sydney University · MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development

Ph.D

About

51
Publications
33,139
Reads
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1,082
Citations
Citations since 2016
38 Research Items
984 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
Introduction
Deputy Director at The MARCS Institute for brain, behaviour and development at Western Sydney University
Additional affiliations
January 2020 - October 2020
Western Sydney University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • I am the Deputy Director of The MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development as well as the Research Program Leader of the Speech & Language program.
January 2015 - December 2019
Western Sydney University
Position
  • Fellow
September 2014 - December 2014
Western Sydney University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
March 2006 - March 2010
Western Sydney University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (51)
Article
Full-text available
The growing interdisciplinary research field of psycholinguistics is in constant need of new and up-to-date tools which will allow researchers to answer complex questions, but also expand on languages other than English, which dominates the field. One type of such tools are picture datasets which provide naming norms for everyday objects. However,...
Article
Full-text available
The automatic retuning of phoneme categories to better adapt to the speech of a novel talker has been extensively documented across various (neurotypical) populations, including both adults and children. However, no studies have examined auditory perceptual learning effects in populations atypical in perceptual, social, and language processing for...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Australians living in rural and remote areas are at elevated risk of mental health problems and must overcome barriers to help seeking, such as poor access, stigma, and entrenched stoicism. e-Mental health services circumvent such barriers using technology, and text-based services are particularly well suited to clients concerned with p...
Article
Full-text available
As many distributional learning (DL) studies have shown, adult listeners can achieve discrimination of a difficult non-native contrast after a short repetitive exposure to tokens falling at the extremes of that contrast. Such studies have shown using behavioural methods that a short distributional training can induce perceptual learning of vowel an...
Conference Paper
Native listener judgements and acoustic comparisons are sensitive to deviations between non-native speech and native productions, but both have drawbacks and are inefficient for evaluating large databases. To probe whether Support Vector Machines (SVM) might offer an efficient alternative, we used three SVM models trained with native Thai lexical t...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Australians living in rural and remote areas are at elevated risk of mental health problems, and must overcome barriers to help-seeking, such as poor access, stigma and entrenched stoicism. E-mental health services circumvent such barriers using technology, and text-based services are particularly well suited to clients concerned with pr...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Australians living in rural and remote areas are at elevated risk of mental health problems and must overcome barriers to help seeking, such as poor access, stigma, and entrenched stoicism. e-Mental health services circumvent such barriers using technology, and text-based services are particularly well suited to clients concerned with...
Article
Full-text available
Background People living in rural and remote areas have poorer access to mental health services than those living in cities. They are also less likely to seek help because of self-stigma and entrenched stoic beliefs about help seeking as a sign of weakness. E-mental health services can span great distances to reach those in need and offer a degree...
Article
Full-text available
Social interactions are vital for healthy brain development. Burgeoning behavioural evidence indicates that a caregiver who provides contingently timed vocal responses to infant vocalisations provides key support for early language development. Understanding how contingently timed vocal responses relate to neurodevelopment in early infancy is lacki...
Conference Paper
Second language speech learning is affected by learners' native language backgrounds. Teachers can facilitate learning by tailoring their pedagogy to cater for unique difficulties induced by native language interference. The present study employed Support Vector Machine (SVM) models to simulate how naïve listeners of diverse tone languages will ass...
Article
A cross tone-language perceptual assimilation study investigated native categorisations and goodness ratings of non-native Thai tones by Thai-naive listeners differing in their native tone systems: Mandarin, Northern Vietnamese and Southern Vietnamese. We derived hypotheses from the Perceptual Assimilation Model (PAM: Best, 1995), which considers b...
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT Non-native tone production and imitation have been found to be phonetically deviant from native production for some discrete measures. However, it remains unresolved whether non-native imitation differs from native production in terms of the differentiation of tones in acoustic tone space. 32 native Mandarin speakers who h...
Preprint
BACKGROUND People living in rural and remote areas have poorer access to mental health services than those living in cities. They also are less likely to seek help because of self-stigma and entrenched stoic beliefs about help-seeking as a sign of weakness. OBJECTIVE E-mental health services have the potential to circumvent these barriers using te...
Article
Bilingual experience has an impact on an individual’s linguistic processing and general cognitive abilities. The relation between these linguistic and non-linguistic domains, in turn, is mediated by individual linguistic proficiency and developmental changes that take place across the lifespan. This study evaluated this relationship by assessing in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Memory load and task-irrelevant phonetic variations influence discrimination of non-native segmental contrasts. We tested how these factors modulate perceptual assimilation and/or discrimination of non-native lexical tone contrasts, relative to Perceptual Assimilation Model (PAM) [1-2] predictions. When perceptually assimilating Thai tones to their...
Article
Purpose We report a preliminary study that prospectively tests the potential cognitive enhancing effect of foreign language (FL) learning in older adults with no clear signs of cognitive decline beyond what is age typical. Because language learning engages a large brain network that overlaps with the network of cognitive aging, we hypothesized that...
Presentation
Full-text available
The ubiquitous nature of the association between linguistic variation and social categories suggests that individuals learn patterns of co-occurring social categories and respective variables from linguistic exposure. Standard exemplar models assume that individual speech utterances are aggregated in memory into exemplar representations that allow...
Article
Full-text available
Bilingualism was once thought to result in cognitive disadvantages, but research in recent decades has demonstrated that experience with two (or more) languages confers a bilingual advantage in executive functions and may delay the incidence of Alzheimer's disease. However, conflicting evidence has emerged leading to questions concerning the robust...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study explores the influences of listeners' native tone inventory on cross-language tone perception. Mandarin, Northern Vietnamese and Southern Vietnamese listeners (n = 13 per group; naive to Thai) categorised Thai tones into their native tone categories. Results show that all three groups categorised most Thai tones into their native tone ca...
Presentation
Full-text available
The social categories that characterise a speaker frequently correlate with the use of linguistic variables. Sociolinguists suggest that this correlation is perceivable as social meaning that is indexed upon the variable (e.g., Campbell-Kibler, 2008; Eckert, 2008; Podesva, 2011). However, variables and social categories which correlate in productio...
Conference Paper
Despite the fact that tone languages account for 70% of the languages in the world (Yip, 2002), studies have concentrated on only a few tone languages, such as Mandarin, Cantonese and Thai. There is a need to study a broader range of tone systems across languages, especially for Southeast Asian languages that are richer in contour tones. One reason...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Listeners adapt rapidly to previously unheard talkers by adjusting phoneme categories using lexical knowledge, in a process termed lexically-guided perceptual learning. Although this is firmly established for listening in the native language (L1), perceptual flexibility in second languages (L2) is as yet less well understood. We report two experime...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Nonnative linguistic features can be difficult for adults to learn. Past studies have shown that learners from various language backgrounds can be trained to perceive lexical tone. Here, we trained native speakers of tone languages Mandarin Chinese and Vietnamese and nontonal English to learn the tones of Hakka Chinese. Although tone language nativ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Language training programs often employ one-size-fits-all approaches that do not consider individual differences between learners. Cognitive views of foreign language learning propose that training should be tailored to suit the abilities of individual learners. We compared two approaches to artificial language learning in adults: 1. tailored train...
Chapter
In this chapter, studies examining speech perception by bilingual listeners are reviewed, including studies that have examined bilinguals’ perception of L1 and/or L2 speech segments, as well as those that have tested perception of unfamiliar, non‐native speech segments. The factors that have been shown to affect bilinguals’ perception are discussed...
Article
Musical experience and linguistic experience have been shown to facilitate language and music perception. However, the precise nature of music and language interaction is still a subject of ongoing research. In this study, using subcortical electrophysiological measures (frequency following response), we seek to understand the effect of interaction...
Article
Full-text available
A growing number of studies on the acquisition of lexical tone by adult learners have revealed that factors such as language background, musical experience, cognitive abilities, and neuroanatomy all play a role in determining tone learning success. On the basis of these findings, it has been argued that the effectiveness of tone learning in adultho...
Article
Full-text available
One of the great challenges facing humankind in the 21st century is preserving healthy brain function in our aging population. Individuals over 60 are the fastest growing age group in the world, and by 2050, it is estimated that the number of people over the age of 60 will triple. The typical aging process involves cognitive decline related to brai...
Article
Full-text available
Across time, languages undergo changes in phonetic, syntactic and semantic dimensions. Social, cognitive and cultural factors contribute to sound change, a phenomenon in which the phonetics of a language undergo changes over time. Individuals who misperceive and produce speech in a slightly divergent manner (called innovators) contribute to variabi...
Article
Full-text available
Although there is variability in nonnative grammar learning outcomes, the contributions of training paradigm design and memory subsystems are not well understood. To examine this, we presented learners with an artificial grammar that formed words via simple and complex morphophonological rules. Across three experiments, we manipulated training para...
Data
Grammar learning data, subject codes, and measures of declarative, procedural, and working memory for Experiment 1. (SAV)
Data
Grammar learning data, subject codes, and measures of declarative, procedural, and working memory for Experiment 2. (SAV)
Article
Full-text available
Learning to distinguish nonnative words that differ in a critical phonetic feature can be difficult. Speech training studies typically employ methods that explicitly direct the learner's attention to the relevant nonnative feature to be learned. However, studies on vision have demonstrated that perceptual learning may occur implicitly, by expo...
Article
Full-text available
The mechanisms that allow for both language-specific and universal constraints in language development are not fully understood. According to the rhythm detection hypothesis, sensitivity to rhythm is the underlying mechanism that is fundamental to language development. Support from a number of Western languages, as well as Mandarin, has led to the...
Article
Numerous factors are thought to be advantageous for non-native language learning although they are typically investigated in isolation, and the interaction between them is not understood. Firstly, bilinguals are claimed to acquire a third language easier than monolinguals acquire a second. Secondly, closely related languages may be easier to learn....
Article
Full-text available
Speech training paradigms aim to maximise learning outcomes by manipulating external factors such as talker variability. However, not all individuals may benefit from such manipulations because subject-external factors interact with subject-internal ones (e.g., aptitude) to determine speech perception and/or learning success. In a previous tone lea...
Article
Full-text available
This study systematically examines the role of intensified exposure to a second language on accommodating talker variability. English native listeners (n = 37) were compared to Mandarin listeners who had either lived in the United States for an extended period of time (n = 33) or had only lived in China (n = 44). Listeners responded to target words...
Article
Full-text available
The perceptual assimilation model (PAM; Best, C. T. [1995]. A direct realist view of cross-language speech perception. In W. Strange (Ed.), Speech perception and linguistic experience: Issues in cross-language research (pp. 171-204). Baltimore, MD: York Press.) accounts for developmental patterns of speech contrast discrimination by proposing that...
Article
Full-text available
Monolingual listeners are constrained by native language experience when categorizing and discriminating unfamiliar non-native contrasts. Are early bilinguals constrained in the same way by their two languages, or do they possess an advantage? Greek-English bilinguals in either Greek or English language mode were compared to monolinguals on categor...
Article
Full-text available
How listeners categorize two phones predicts the success with which they will discriminate the given phonetic distinction. In the case of bilinguals, such perceptual patterns could reveal whether the listener's two phonological systems are integrated or separate. This is of particular interest when a given contrast is realized differently in each l...
Article
Full-text available
Speech production research has demonstrated that the first language (L1) often interferes with production in bilinguals' second language (L2), but it has been suggested that bilinguals who are L2-dominant are the most likely to suppress this L1-interference. While prolonged contextual changes in bilinguals' language use (e.g., stays overseas) are k...
Article
Full-text available
The way that bilinguals produce phones in each of their languages provides a window into the nature of the bilingual phonological space. For stop consonants, if early sequential bilinguals, whose languages differ in voice onset time (VOT) distinctions, produce native-like VOTs in each of their languages, it would imply that they have developed sepa...

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