Mark A. Albins

Mark A. Albins
University of South Alabama | USA · Department of Marine Sciences

PhD

About

25
Publications
12,303
Reads
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1,931
Citations
Citations since 2016
6 Research Items
1200 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Additional affiliations
May 2012 - December 2015
Auburn University
Position
  • Research Fellow II
September 2005 - May 2012
Oregon State University
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Full-text available
In 1983–1984, an unknown waterborne pathogen caused the mass mortality of long-spined sea urchin (Diadema antillarum) across the Caribbean and western tropical Atlantic. After approximately 15 years, urchin populations began to recover at some locations, yet few have reached pre-mortality densities. To date, no study has documented a recovery in th...
Preprint
Full-text available
Hackerott et al. (2017) report that Indo-Pacific lionfish “had no apparent effect on native prey communities” (p. 9) on continuous reef-sites of the Belizean Barrier Reef (BBR). Based on a lack of observational evidence, they challenge existing evidence for the effects of predation by lionfish on native prey community structure and assert that prev...
Preprint
Full-text available
Hackerott et al. (2017) report that Indo-Pacific lionfish “had no apparent effect on native prey communities” (p. 9) on continuous reef-sites of the Belizean Barrier Reef (BBR). Based on a lack of observational evidence, they challenge existing evidence for the effects of predation by lionfish on native prey community structure and assert that prev...
Article
Full-text available
Indo-Pacific lionfishes (Pterois volitans/miles) have undergone rapid population growth and reached extremely high densities in parts of the invaded Atlantic. However, their long-term population trends in areas without active management programs are unknown. Since 2005, we have monitored lionfish abundance in the Exuma Cays of the central Bahamas o...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive predators typically have larger effects on native prey populations than native predators, yet the potential roles of their consumptive versus non-consumptive effects (CEs vs. NCEs) in structuring invaded systems remains unclear. Invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans) may have ecosystem-level effects by altering native fish grazing on benthic...
Article
Full-text available
Indo-Pacific lionfish Pterois volitans/miles were likely introduced to Florida coastal waters via the aquarium trade and have spread rapidly along the southeastern coast of the United States and throughout the greater Caribbean region, including Bermuda and the Gulf of Mexico. This mesopredator has strong consumptive effects on native demersal fish...
Article
Pacific red lionfish Pterois volitans, introduced to Atlantic waters in the 1980s, represent a particularly successful invasive marine predator with strong effects on native prey. Previous experiments examining the effects of lionfish on native fish communities have been conducted on small patch reefs. However, the effects of lionfish on native ree...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
EXTENDED ABSTRACT Pacific red lionfish (Pterois volitans) have now spread throughout the Gulf of Mexico and the greater Caribbean region. Invasive lionfish are voracious and generalized predators of dozens of small fish species (Albins and Hixon 2008), including the juveniles of important fishery species, and are seafloor habitat generalists, occup...
Article
Full-text available
The invasive Pacific red lionfish (Pterois volitans) poses a threat to western Atlantic and Carib-bean coral reef systems. Lionfish are small-bodied pred-ators that can reduce the abundance and diversity of native fishes via predation. Additionally, native preda-tors or competitors appear to have a negligible effect on similarly sized lionfish. Nas...
Conference Paper
Current evidence suggests that juvenile mortality rates of red snapper Lutjanus campechanus are density dependent, with year-class mortality varying inversely with year-class strength in both age-0 and age-1 fish. Such compensatory effects often arise in early post-settlement reef fishes as a result of high levels of predation when refuge space is...
Article
Full-text available
This study compares percentage cover of benthic organisms at the species level at Pearl and Hermes Atoll (PHA), the largest atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, to determine (1) the degree of difference among sites, (2) whether wave-exposure zones explain observed patterns in benthic community structure, and (3) whether species richness diff...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Invasive lionfish are highly effective predators that severely threaten Caribbean and Atlantic fish populations. Most coral reef fish populations are regulated by density dependent mortality due to predation. Because lionfish can consume significantly more small fish than ecologically similar native predators, they hav...
Article
Field and laboratory observations of feeding by invasive Pacific red lionfish Pterois volitans were conducted during June through August of 2008, 2009 and 2010 near Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas. Observations of this invasive marine predator revealed a previously undocumented piscivorous behavior. While slowly approaching prey fish, lionfish produce...
Article
The recent irruption of Pacific red lionfish (Pterois volitans) on Caribbean and Atlantic coral reefs could prove to be one of the most damaging marine invasions to date. Invasive lionfish are reaching densities much higher than those reported from their native range, and they have a strong negative effect on the recruitment and abundance of a broa...
Article
Full-text available
The Pacific red lionfish has recently invaded Western Atlantic and Caribbean coral reefs, and may become one of the most ecologically harmful marine fish introductions to date. Lionfish possess a broad suite of traits that makes them particularly successful invaders and strong negative interactors with native fauna, including defensive venomous spi...
Article
Full-text available
Note: this is a review of Helfman's (2007) A Guide to Understanding and Restoring Global Fish Conservation: Aquatic Biodiversity and Fishery Resources
Thesis
Full-text available
Predatory lionfishes (Pterois volitans and P. miles) were introduced to Florida waters during the mid to late 1980s, and eventually established self-sustaining breeding populations in the tropical western Atlantic. These invasive species are now widespread along the southeastern seaboard of the United States, across the Caribbean Sea, and in the Gu...
Data
Test of isolation‐by‐distance in yellow tang collected from the Island of Hawai'i. Adult and juvenile samples were treated as separate populations. Mantel tests were run in GENEPOP with both normal and log‐transformed distances and with FST and FST/(1‐FST). Tests could not reject the null hypothesis of no isolation‐by distance. At the within‐island...
Data
Description of the methods employed to calculate the abundance of yellow tang and estimates of connectivity between sites where parents and offspring were identified (Text S1). We also include a table of adult abundance estimates (Table S1) and estimated connectivity between sites (Table S2). (DOC)
Article
Full-text available
Acceptance of marine protected areas (MPAs) as fishery and conservation tools has been hampered by lack of direct evidence that MPAs successfully seed unprotected areas with larvae of targeted species. For the first time, we present direct evidence of large-scale population connectivity within an existing and effective network of MPAs. A new parent...
Article
Full-text available
The Indo-Pacific lionfish Pterois volitans, introduced to Florida waters in the early 1990s, is currently spreading rapidly throughout the Caribbean region. This invasive carnivore may cause deleterious changes in coral-reef ecosystems via predation on native fishes and invertebrates as well as competition with native predators. We conducted a cont...
Article
Large amounts of derelict fishing gear accumulate and cause damage to shallow coral reefs of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). To facilitate maintenance of reefs cleaned during 1996-2005 removal efforts, we identify likely high-density debris areas by assessing reef characteristics (depth, benthic habitat type, and energy regime) that influ...

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