Marius Romme

Marius Romme
University of Birmingham

Psychiatrist full professor of psychiatry from

About

35
Publications
14,731
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1,485
Citations
Citations since 2017
2 Research Items
442 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (35)
Chapter
Over the past three decades in Maastricht, the Netherlands, psychiatrist Marius Romme and researcher Sandra Escher have developed a new approach to hearing voices which emphasizes accepting and making sense of the experience. Since Romme and Escher's initial work, substantial empirical support has been provided for the Maastricht approach's key pro...
Article
Full-text available
Growing evidence suggests a meaningful association between life experience, particularly trauma and loss, and subsequent psychotic symptomatology. This paper describes a method of psychological formulation to analyse the relation- ship between the content and characteristics of voices (“auditory hallucinations”) and experienced adversity in the lif...
Chapter
The Hearing Voices Movement is an international movement directed at creating opportunities for voice hearers to exchange experiences and knowledge about the hearing of voices. This is mostly done in groups of voice hearers where the participants can feel safe and respected and where their experiences are accepted rather than criticized. The partic...
Article
Hallucinations provides a practical guide to the assessment, evaluation, and treatment of hallucinations, and also addresses a range of interventions.
Chapter
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The history of the Maastricht approach and of the hearing voices movementRelevant research findingsAssessment: The Maastricht hearing voices interviewFormulation: Making the construct/breaking the codeCase vignette: MaureenMaking a treatment planTalking with the voicesRecoverySummaryReferences
Article
Auditory hallucination, or hearing voices, is generally associated with psychopathology. In psychiatry it is inter-preted as a symptom of an illness, with no connection to the individual's life history. Voice hallucinations in childhood occur in a variety of contexts and have variable long-term outcomes. Little is known about the course of the expe...
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Full-text available
‘What you ignore persists, what you look at disappears.’ (N.D. Walsh) Dit artikel geeft een kort overzicht van behandeltechnieken bij auditieve hallucinaties, vooral mensen die stemmen horen. De meeste aandacht gaat uit naar de Voice dialogue-methode, ontwikkeld door Stone en Stone, die als inspiratie dient voor het veranderen van de dialoog tuss...
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Background: The level of self-initiated coping defences in the face of auditory hallucinations reflects the degree to which the psychotic experiences are exceeding the person's resources. As it has been suggested that individuals who feel overwhelmed by their psychotic experiences are also more likely to develop depression, greater levels of self-i...
Article
Previous work suggests that auditory hallucinations in children and adolescents occur frequently in the absence of psychotic illness, although a number of such children go on to develop more severe psychotic symptomatology and need for care. We examined prospectively what factors are associated with formation of delusions in adolescents who are hea...
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Childhood hallucinations of voices occur in a variety of contexts and have variable long-term outcomes. To study the course of experience of voices sequentially over a 3-year period in those with and those without a need for mental health care (patient status). In a group of 80 children of mean age 12.9 years (s.d. = 3.1), of which around 50% were...
Article
The form and the content of chronic auditory hallucinations were compared in three cohorts, namely patients with schizophrenia, patients with a dissociative disorder, and nonpatient voice-hearers. The form of the hallucinatory experiences was not significantly different between the three groups. The subjects in the nonpatient group, unlike those in...
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