Marisa Vedor

Marisa Vedor
University of Porto | UP · Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos (CIBIO)

PhD

About

11
Publications
9,317
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406
Citations
Introduction
I am a marine biologist with keen interest in conservation biology. Understanding the fish migration, behaviour and physiology are very important for the adaptation of action plans together with climate change model predictions. Therefore I am working on blue and mako sharks, and looking into how climate change will affect their ecology and susceptibility to fisheries pressure.
Additional affiliations
August 2020 - present
University of Porto
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2014 - December 2019
University of Porto
Field of study
  • Biodiversity, genetics and evolution
August 2011 - September 2013
Lund University
Field of study
  • Conservation Biology
September 2008 - July 2011
University of Porto
Field of study
  • Aquatic sciences

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Significance Global vessel traffic is increasing alongside world economic growth. The potential for rising lethal ship strikes on endangered species of marine megafauna, such as the plankton-feeding whale shark, remains poorly understood since areas of highest overlap are seldom determined across an entire species range. Here we show how satellite...
Article
Full-text available
Global abundances of oceanic pelagic sharks have declined due to overfishing. Internationally protected shark species remain at risk due to indiscriminate bycatch in longline fisheries with under-reported catches affecting reliability of population assessments for management. However, the scale of under-reporting remains poorly understood. Here we...
Article
Full-text available
106,107 ✉ replying to A. V. Harry & J. M. Braccini Nature https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03463-w (2021) Our global analysis 1 estimated the overlap and fishing exposure risk (FEI) using the space use of satellite-tracked sharks and longline fishing effort monitored by the automatic identification system (AIS). In the accompanying Comment, Harry...
Article
This article is a response to Murua et al.'s Matters Arising article in Nature, "Shark mortality cannot be assessed by fishery overlap alone," which arose from arising from N. Queiroz et al. Nature https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-019-1444-4 (2019).
Article
Full-text available
In the pelagic environment diel vertical movements (DVM) are widespread across taxa, from zooplankton ascending from day-time depths into surface layers at night to avoid visual predators, to apex predators following prey movements to maximise foraging opportunities. The drivers of DVM in large predators such as pelagic sharks have only recently be...
Article
Full-text available
Climate-driven expansions of ocean hypoxic zones are predicted to concentrate pelagic fish in oxygenated surface layers, but how expanding hypoxia and fisheries will interact to affect threatened pelagic sharks remains unknown. Here, analysis of satellite-tracked blue sharks and environmental modelling in the eastern tropical Atlantic oxygen minimu...
Article
Full-text available
Effective ocean management and conservation of highly migratory species depends on resolving overlap between animal movements and distributions and fishing effort. Yet, this information is lacking at a global scale. Here we show, using a big-data approach combining satellite-tracked movements of pelagic sharks and global fishing fleets, that 24% of...
Poster
Full-text available
The shortfin mako shark Isurus oxyrinchus is one of the fastest sharks, reaching speeds of up to 70 km/h. Belonging to family Lamnidae it is the second-most common oceanic shark caught by high seas longlines, mainly because of the high value of shortfin mako fins and meat. North Atlantic reported catches currently exceed 3300 tons annually and the...
Article
Full-text available
The spawning migration of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) to the Sargasso Sea is one of the greatest animal migrations. However, the duration and route of the migration remain uncertain. Using fishery data from 20 rivers across Europe, we show that most eels begin their oceanic migration between August and December. We used electronic taggi...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The importance of environmental context on behavioural and habitat use patterns of satellite tracked pelagic predators: implications for fisheries interactions