Marion Pfeifer

Marion Pfeifer
Newcastle University | NCL · School of Natural and Environmental Sciences

PhD Natural Sciences

About

77
Publications
36,201
Reads
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3,057
Citations
Introduction
Conservation scientist and ecologist with skills in remote sensing and an active research programme on biodiversity and biophysical structure underpinning ecosystem services in human-modified tropical landscapes.
Additional affiliations
March 2012 - December 2015
Imperial College London
Position
  • Research Associate Landscape Ecology
August 2009 - present
The University of York
January 2007 - July 2009

Publications

Publications (77)
Article
Full-text available
Millions of people rely on nature-rich farming systems for their subsistence and income. The contributions of nature to these systems are varied and key to their sustainability in the long term. Yet, agricultural stakeholders are often unaware or undervalue the relevance of those contributions, which can affect decisions concerning land management....
Article
Full-text available
Background The scale of land degradation worldwide has led the UN to declare the Decade of Ecosystem Restoration and movements such as the Bonn Challenge ( https://www.bonnchallenge.org/ ), have placed ecological restoration on the global policy agenda. Achieving such ambitious policy targets and restoration goals will necessitate complex trade-off...
Article
Logging and habitat conversion create hotter microclimates in tropical forest landscapes, representing a powerful form of localised anthropogenic climate change. It is widely believed that these emergent conditions are responsible for driving changes in communities of organisms found in modified tropical forests, although the empirical evidence bas...
Article
The Atlantic Forest, a global biodiversity hotspot, has changed dramatically due to land use pressures causing deforestation, degradation, and forest fragmentation. A major challenge is to understand and potentially mitigate the consequences of these changes, for the capacity of forests to deliver essential environmental services to rural areas. He...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Atlantic Forest, a global biodiversity hotspot, has changed dramatically due to land 12 use pressures causing deforestation, degradation, and forest fragmentation. A major challenge is 13 to understand and potentially mitigate the consequences of these changes, for the capacity of 14 forests to deliver essential environmental services to rural...
Article
Full-text available
Lianas are woody vines, rooted in the soil, and supported physically by trees. Lianas contribute to forest ecosystem functioning globally, but especially in the tropics and subtropics. However, prolific liana growth following heavy disturbance frequently affects subsequent recovery of forest tree diversity, biomass, structure, and function. Underst...
Article
Full-text available
Decades of research suggest that species richness depends on spatial characteristics of habitat patches, especially their size and isolation. In contrast, the habitat amount hypothesis predicts that: 1) species richness in plots of fixed size (species density) is more strongly and positively related to the amount of habitat around the plot than to...
Article
Habitat loss is the primary driver of biodiversity decline worldwide, but the effects of fragmentation (the spatial arrangement of remaining habitat) are debated. We tested the hypothesis that forest fragmentation sensitivity-affected by avoidance of habitat edges-should be driven by historical exposure to, and therefore species' evolutionary respo...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical landscapes are changing rapidly due to changes in land use and land management. Being able to predict and monitor land use change impacts on species for conservation or food security concerns requires the use of habitat quality metrics, that are consistent, can be mapped using above-ground sensor data and are relevant for species performan...
Preprint
Tropical landscapes are changing rapidly due to changes in land use and land management. Being able to predict and monitor land use change impacts on species for conservation or food security concerns requires the use of habitat quality metrics, that are consistent, can be mapped using above - ground sensor data and are relevant for species perform...
Preprint
Full-text available
Tropical landscapes are changing rapidly due to changes in land use and land management. Being able to predict and monitor land use change impacts on species for conservation or food security concerns requires the use of habitat quality metrics, that are consistent, can be mapped using above - ground sensor data and are relevant for species perform...
Article
Full-text available
1.The assembly of species communities at local scales is thought to be driven by environmental filtering, species interactions, and spatial processes such as dispersal limitation. Little is known about how the relative balance of these drivers of community assembly changes along environmental gradients, especially man‐made environmental gradients a...
Article
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There has been an increasing interest in fodder trees and their potential to help the rural poor. However, few studies have addressed the ecological impacts of fodder tree harvesting. We investigated the species harvested and the techniques used, and the effects of fodder harvesting on (1) species’ populations and (2) forest carbon stocks in three...
Article
Full-text available
Borneo contains some of the world's most biodiverse and carbon-dense tropical forest, but this 750 000 km² island has lost 62 % of its old-growth forests within the last 40 years. Efforts to protect and restore the remaining forests of Borneo hinge on recognizing the ecosystem services they provide, including their ability to store and sequester ca...
Article
Full-text available
Borneo contains some of the world’s most biodiverse and carbon dense tropical forest, but this 750 000-km2 island has lost 62 % of its old-growth forests within the last 40 years. Efforts to protect and restore the remaining forests of Borneo hinge on recognising the ecosystem services they provide, including their ability to store and sequester ca...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical montane forests are amongst the most threatened ecosystems by climate change. However, little is known about climatic changes already observed in these montane areas in Africa, or the adaptation strategies used by pastoralist communities. This article, focused on three mountains in northern Kenya, aims to fill these knowledge gaps. Focus-g...
Article
Full-text available
Background Canopy structure, defined by leaf area index (LAI), fractional vegetation cover (FCover) and fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR), regulates a wide range of forest functions and ecosystem services. Spatially consistent field-measurements of canopy structure are however lacking, particularly for the tropics. Me...
Article
Changes in structure and functioning of tree communities in response to forest fragmentation may alter tropical forest’s capacity to store carbon and regulate climate. However, evidence for indirect effects of forest fragmentation on above – and belowground carbon pools through changes in forest biodiversity is scarce. Here we focus on understandin...
Article
Canopy structure, defined by leaf area index (LAI), fractional vegetation cover (FCover) and fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR), regulates a wide range of forest functions and ecosystem services. Spatially consistent field-measurements of canopy structure are however lacking, particularly for the tropics. Here, we intr...
Article
Full-text available
Carbon-based policies provide powerful opportunities to unite tropical forest conservation with climate change mitigation. However, their effectiveness in delivering biodiversity co-benefits is dependent on high levels of biodiversity being found in high carbon areas. Previous studies have focussed solely on the co-benefits associated with Reducing...
Article
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Forest edges influence more than half of the world's forests and contribute to worldwide declines in biodiversity and ecosystem functions. However, predicting these declines is challenging in heterogeneous fragmented landscapes. Here we assembled a global dataset on species responses to fragmentation and developed a statistical approach for quantif...
Article
South East Asia region is a triple hotspot of carbon, biodiversity, and forest degradation. The latter is leading to heterogeneous forest landscapes with predominant and varying intensity of human modification. Optical Earth observation data offers the most feasible and accessible means of mapping and monitoring the forest cover heterogeneity in th...
Article
Recent work in the tropics has advanced our understanding of the local impacts of land-use change on species richness. However, we still have a limited ability to make predictions about species abundances, especially in heterogeneous landscapes. Species abundances directly affect the functioning of an ecosystem and its conservation value. We applie...
Data
Figure S1. Relationship between catchment forest quality PC1 scores and riparian forest quality PC1 scores for each of the sixteen stream sites Table S1. Details of how streams will be affected by proposed future logging at the SAFE Project Table S2. Loading scores showing how original forest quality variables correspond to the principal componen...
Article
Borneo contains some of the world's most biodiverse and carbon dense tropical forest, but this 750,000-km2 island has lost 62% of its old-growth forests within the last 40 years. Efforts to protect and restore the remaining forests of Borneo hinge on recognising the ecosystem services they provide, including their ability to store and sequester car...
Article
Full-text available
Freshwaters provide valuable habitat and important ecosystem services, but are threatened worldwide by habitat loss and degradation. In Southeast Asia, rainforest streams are particularly threatened by logging and conversion to oil palm, but we lack information on the impacts of this on freshwater environmental conditions, and the relative importan...
Article
Fragmentation and habitat loss contribute considerably to global declines of amphibians and reptiles. However, few studies focus on forest edges, created during the fragmentation process, as proximate drivers of the local demographic structure of populations. Here, we use abundance data of amphibians and reptiles to study their responses to forest...
Article
Fragmentation and habitat loss contribute considerably to global declines of amphibians and reptiles. However, few studies focus on forest edges, created during the fragmentation process, as proximate drivers of the local demographic structure of populations. Here, we use abundance data of amphibians and reptiles to study their responses to forest...
Article
South East Asia has the highest rate of lowland forest loss of any tropical region, with logging and deforestation for conversion to plantation agriculture being flagged as the most urgent threats. Detecting and mapping logging impacts on forest structure is a primary conservation concern, as these impacts feed through to changes in biodiversity an...
Article
Full-text available
Freshwaters provide valuable habitat and important ecosystem services, but are threatened worldwide by habitat loss and degradation. In Southeast Asia, rainforest streams are particularly threatened by logging and conversion to oil palm, but we lack information on the impacts of this on freshwater environmental conditions, and the relative importan...
Article
Full-text available
We have limited understanding of how tropical canopy foliage varies along environmental gradients, and how this may in turn affect forest processes and functions. Here, we analyse the relationships between canopy leaf area index (LAI) and above ground herbaceous biomass (AGB H) along environmental gradients in a moist forest and miombo woodland in...
Article
Full-text available
Coffee production is one of the main economic activities in Ethiopia, representing about 40% of the country’s economy. Coffee is particularly important in the Ethiopian highlands, where appropriate climate allows higher productivity and quality. The Ethiopian highlands also host an outstanding biodiversity, being considered one of the world’s most...
Article
Full-text available
Invertebrates are dominant species in primary tropical rainforests, where their abundance and diversity contributes to the functioning and resilience of these globally important ecosystems. However, more than one-third of tropical forests have been logged, with dramatic impacts on rainforest biodiversity that may disrupt key ecosystem processes. We...
Article
Full-text available
Despite a large increase in the area of selectively logged tropical forest worldwide, the carbon stored in deadwood across a tropical forest degradation gradient at the landscape scale remains poorly documented. Many carbon stock studies have either focused exclusively on live standing biomass or have been carried out in primary forests that are un...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background . At least a fifth of tropical forests have been logged in the recent past. This practice is an important source of timber but there are concerns about its long-sustainability and impacts on biodiversity and carbon storage. However, there is wide variation in the impacts of logging, making generalisation, and thus policy implementation,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background . At least a fifth of tropical forests have been logged in the recent past. This practice is an important source of timber but there are concerns about its long-sustainability and impacts on biodiversity and carbon storage. However, there is wide variation in the impacts of logging, making generalisation, and thus policy implementation,...
Article
Full-text available
Land use change is a major threat to biodiversity. One mechanism by which land use change influences biodiversity and ecological processes is through changes in the local climate. Here, the relationships between leaf area index and five climate variables – air temperature, relative humidity, vapour pressure deficit, specific humidity and soil tempe...
Article
Anthropogenic global change compromises forest resilience, with profound impacts to ecosystem functions and services. This synthesis paper reflects on the current understanding of forest resilience and potential tipping points under environmental change and explores challenges to assessing responses using experiments, observations and models.Forest...
Article
![Figure][1] PHOTOS: (DOGS) ROGER DE LA HARPE/WWW.AFRICAIMAGERY.COM; (ELEPHANTS) LAUREN EVANS/WWW.GEOG.CAM.AC.UK/PEOPLE/L.EVANS AND WWW.SPACEFORGIANTS.ORG Human-driven habitat fragmentation reduces global biodiversity and ecosystem functioning ([ 1 ][2]). R. Woodroffe et al. (“To fence or
Article
Full-text available
Habitat fragmentation studies have produced complex results that are challenging to synthesize. Inconsistencies among studies may result from variation in the choice of landscape metrics and response variables, which is often compounded by a lack of key statistical or methodological information. Collating primary datasets on biodiversity responses...
Article
Full-text available
The recent Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) LAI3g product provides a 30-year global times-series of remotely sensed leaf area index (LAI), an essential variable in models of ecosystem process and productivity. In this study, we use a new dataset of field-based LAITrue to indirectly validate the GIMMS LAI3g product, LAIavhrr, in...
Article
Carbon-based forest conservation requires the establishment of ‘reference emission levels’ against which to measure a country or region’s progress in reducing their carbon emissions. In East Africa, landscape-scale estimates of carbon fluxes are uncertain and factors such as deforestation poorly resolved due to a lack of data. In this study, trends...
Article
Creel et al. argue against the conservation effectiveness of fencing based on a population measure that ignores the importance of top predators to ecosystem processes. Their statistical analyses consider, first, only a subset of fenced reserves and, second, an incomplete examination of 'costs per lion.' Our original conclusions remain unaltered.
Article
Full-text available
Conservationists often advocate for landscape approaches to wildlife management while others argue for physical separation between protected species and human communities, but direct empirical comparisons of these alternatives are scarce. We relate African lion population densities and population trends to contrasting management practices across 42...