Marion Cambridge

Marion Cambridge
University of Western Australia | UWA · School of Plant Biology

PhD

About

69
Publications
26,542
Reads
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3,472
Citations
Citations since 2016
19 Research Items
1402 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Additional affiliations
August 2009 - present
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Research Associate
January 1986 - July 1998
Utrecht University
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (69)
Article
Full-text available
Kelp forests are experiencing substantial declines due to climate change, particularly ocean warming and marine heatwaves, and active interventions are necessary to halt this decline. A new restoration approach termed “green gravel” has shown promise as a tool to combat kelp forest loss. In this approach, substrata (i.e. small gravel) are seeded wi...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims Southwest Australia is a biodiversity hotspot, with greatest plant species diversity on the most severely phosphorus (P)-impoverished soils. Here, non-mycorrhizal species with highly-effective carboxylate-releasing P-acquisition strategies coexist with mycorrhizal species that are less effective at accessing P on these soils. No...
Article
The response of mangrove (Avicennia marina) seedlings to treated (wet) sludge from a sewage treatment plant (STP) was tested in a randomized block design experiment at a tree nursery on Mubarraz Island in the Arabian Gulf. The growth response of seedlings to half-strength and full-strength STP sludge was monitored over 103 days and compared with th...
Article
Full-text available
Marine heatwaves (MHWs) have caused declines in many kelp forests globally. Although the ecological effects of these climatic extremes have been well examined, studies on the role of genotypic variation in underpinning population responses under pressures are lacking. Understanding how kelps respond to different warming profiles and, in particular,...
Article
Construction works along a causeway at Mubarraz Island near Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, in the Arabian Gulf necessitated the salvaging and replanting of 300 mangroves (Avicennia marina). Mangroves were excavated manually by shovel (smaller trees and saplings) or mechanically using a backhoe excavator (larger trees), transported with the root b...
Article
Full-text available
Nature-based coastal defence approaches are increasingly being explored to protect shorelines from erosion and climate change-related threats such as sea level rise, storms and coastal flooding. At Mubarraz, near Abu Dhabi in the Arabian Gulf, mass plantings of >500 000 nursery-reared seedlings of the mangrove Avicennia marina were conducted over 3...
Article
Full-text available
Seeds of Australian species of the seagrass genus Posidonia are covered by a membranous wing that we hypothesize plays a fundamental role in seed establishment in sandy, wave swept marine environments. Dimensions of the seed and membrane were quantified under electron microscopy and micro-CT scans, and used to model rotational, drag and lift forces...
Article
Full-text available
Kelps (order Laminariales) are foundation species in temperate and arctic seas globally, but they are in decline in many places. Laminarian kelp have an alternation of generations and this poses challenges for experimental studies due to the difficulties in achieving zoospore release and gametophyte growth. Here, we review and synthesize the protoc...
Article
Full-text available
Hybridization is common among plants and has been crucial in the evolution of many aquatic plant groups. However, hybrid individuals are often difficult to identify, particularly in the marine environment. We aim to confirm a hybrid origin between two seagrass species for a morphologically-intermediate plant observed in shallow subtidal environment...
Article
Desalination has the potential to provide an important source of potable water to growing coastal populations but it also produces highly saline brines with chemical additives, posing a possible threat to benthic marine communities. The effects of brine (0%, 50%, 100%) were compared to seawater treatments with the same salinity (37, 46, 54 psu) for...
Chapter
This chapter lists all Australian seagrass species with their synonyms, which are currently accepted by the IPNI (International Plant Name Index) and the Plant List; the world authority of plant taxonomy. It also briefly reviews taxonomic studies on the Australian seagrasses and includes keys to all Australian seagrass species, with the practical g...
Chapter
Full-text available
Seagrasses are monocotyledonous angiosperms, and as with terrestrial angiosperms, they have vegetative organs (roots, rhizomes and shoots with leaf sheaths and leaf blades), and reproductive organs (flowers, fruits and seeds). They have adapted to a marine environment in a saline medium, and have rather simple tissues and cell types such as a thin...
Article
Background and aims: Ephemeral seagrasses that respond rapidly to environmental changes are important marine habitats. However, they are under threat due to human activity and are logistically difficult and expensive to study. This study aimed to develop a new functional-structural environmentally dependent model of ephemeral seagrass, able to int...
Article
Highly saline brines from desalination plants expose seagrass communities to salt stress. We examined effects of raised salinity (46 and 54psu) compared with seawater controls (37psu) over 6weeks on the seagrass, Posidonia australis, growing in tanks with the aim of separating effects of salinity from other potentially deleterious components of bri...
Article
Knowledge of plant mechanical traits is important in understanding how plants resist abiotic and biotic forces and in explaining ecological strategies such as leaf lifespan. To date, these traits have not been systematically evaluated in seagrasses. We analysed mechanical (breaking force and tensile strength) and associated traits (thickness, width...
Article
Full-text available
In a recent paper by Thomson et al. (2014), vivipary is implied for the eastern Australian Zostera, Zostera nigricaulis (revised from Zostera tasmanica; Kuo 2005). However, the definition of vivipary (production of genetically distinct offspring resulting from sexual reproduction) needs to be fully explored in terms of the experimental claims by th...
Article
Full-text available
In coastal and estuarine systems, foundation species like seagrasses, mangroves, saltmarshes or corals provide important ecosystem services. Seagrasses are globally declining and their reintroduction has been shown to restore ecosystem functions. However, seagrass restoration is often challenging, given the dynamic and stressful environment that se...
Article
Full-text available
Seed represents a potentially ecologically sustainable source of planting units for restoring seagrasses, particularly for seagrasses where transplanting negatively impacts donor beds. However, newly germinated seeds may be nutrient limited as their underdeveloped root systems may constrain capacity to access sediment-based resources. We conducted...
Article
Full-text available
Seeds of the seagrass Posidonia australis are desiccation sensitive and as there is no seed dormancy seeds cannot be stored for use in restoration projects. To realize the restoration potential of seed-based restoration of Posidonia, this study investigated preconditioning seedlings of Posidonia in aquaculture facilities before transplanting to ext...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Osmoregulation is essential for the survival of seagrasses in marine and hypersaline environments. The aim of this study was to examine ion concentrations of four seagrass species (Posidonia australis, P. sinuosa, Amphibolis antarctica and A. griffithii) after exposure to salinity changes. Plant fragments were placed in a series of aquaria at marin...
Article
Full-text available
Sulfides in sediments and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) intrusion in plant tissues were investigated for six species of seagrass in Shark Bay, Western Australia, at two sites with elevated salinities of 42 and 45 psu. H2S intrusion ranged from <20% to 100% in roots and rhizomes, indicating a high degree of sulfide intrusion in some cases, although this di...
Article
Full-text available
Seagrasses are exposed to the constant risk of structural damage due to abiotic factors, such as waves and currents, and biotic factors, e.g. herbivory. Leaf mechanical resistance is therefore essential in protecting plants from structural failure and may also have ecological consequences. For example, mechanical traits of seagrass leaves may play...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the root systems of 2 temperate seagrasses, Posidonia australis and P. sinuosa, testing the effects of nutrients and season on root architecture. Transplants of each species were grown in pots containing a standardised sand medium and a localised supply of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), or N and P combined. P. australis and P. sinuosa sh...
Article
Full-text available
Global seagrass losses parallel significant declines observed in corals and mangroves over the past 50 years. These combined declines have resulted in accelerated global losses to ecosystem services in coastal waters. Seagrass meadows can be extensive (hundreds of square kilometers) and long-lived (thousands of years), with the meadows persisting p...
Article
Full-text available
Seagrasses are important marine plants that are under threat globally. Restoration by transplanting vegetative fragments or seedlings into areas where seagrasses have been lost is possible, but long-term trial data are limited. The goal of this study is to use available short-term data to predict long-term outcomes of transplanting seagrass. A func...
Article
The effects of nutrients and planting season on root growth were investigated in transplants of the seagrasses Posidonia australis and P. sinuosa. Difficulties with sampling and estimating root growth of these submerged plants were overcome by growing transplants, with all roots removed initially, in pots containing a standardized sand medium. Nitr...
Article
Full-text available
We developed 10 polymorphic microsatellite markers in the Australian seagrass Posidonia australis Hook. f. Markers were screened for their ability to detect within- and among-population genetic structure and variation. The markers showed a range in levels of polymorphism from fixed differences between the two sampled seagrass meadows to high levels...
Article
Addition of nutrients to sediments has been proposed as a means of enhancing transplantation success in seagrasses. The effects of nutrient and iron additions to natural sediments on the growth and morphology of Posidonia australis transplants were evaluated in underwater plots in two contrasting environments: a coastal embayment (Princess Royal Ha...
Article
Transplant trials of the seagrass Posidonia australis were carried out after loss of seagrasses following eutrophication and increased turbidity in two marine inlets on the south coast of Western Australia. A pilot study in Oyster Harbour measured survival and growth in situ for 4 years. Long-term survival rates were high (96–98%), providing plants...
Article
Full-text available
South–west Australia contains extensive seagrass meadows along 2,500 km of coastline from the shallow subtidal to 50+ m water depths, and in many of the 51 bar-built estuaries along the coast. There are geomorphological differences between the south and west coasts that result in different patterns of swell exposure influencing the processes that s...
Article
Full-text available
This is a retrospective study of shifts in species composition of epiphytic macroalgae that occurred during a period of seagrass loss in Cockburn Sound, Western Australia. Detailed analysis of data on relative abundances of 108 epiphytic taxa collected over 2 yr from 27 widely dispersed sites around Cockburn Sound showed differences in epiphyte com...
Chapter
Full-text available
At least 17,000 km separate the endemic Mediterranean Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile from the eight other species of the same genus (P. angustifolia Cambridge and Kuo, P. australis Hooker, P. coriacea Kuo and Cambridge, P. denhartogii Kuo and Cambridge, P. kirkmanii Kuo and Cambridge, P. ostenfeldii Den Hartog, P. robertsoniae Kuo and Cambridge, an...
Article
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This study examines the first stages of recovery of seagrasses (Posidoniaceae) after extensive losses during the 1980s were documented in Oyster Harbour, a marine inlet near Albany on the south coast of Western Australia. Two mechanisms of recovery were evident for the dominant seagrass species Posidonia australis Hook. f. and Posidonia sinuosa Cam...
Article
Changes in seagrass coverage in Cockburn Sound from 1967 to 1999 were assessed from aerial photographs using modern mapping methods with the aim of accurately determining the magnitude of change in hectares of seagrasses between 1967 and 1999 and to set up a baseline for future monitoring of seagrass loss in Cockburn Sound. Firstly, coverage and as...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates factors determining variation in photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (φN) in seven slow- and fast-growing Poa species from altitudinally contrasting sites. The species and their environmental origin were (in order of increasing relative growth rate): two alpine (Poa fawcettiae and P. costiniana), one sub-alpine (P. alpina...
Article
Above-ground primary production and nutrient fluxes (N and P) were investigated for two species of seagrass, Posidonia sinuosa Cambridge et Kuo and P. australis Hook. f. from Warnbro and Cockburn Sounds over an annual cycle, at sites ranging in depth from 0.5–10 m where P. sinuosa formed either single-species stands or co-occurred with P. australis...
Article
Full-text available
Wheat (Triticum aestivum cv Chinese Spring) supplied with 0.45 mM SO42- for 14 d with relative growth rates (RGR) of 0.22 to 0.24 d-1 was deprived of S for 7 to 8 d. There was no significant effect on RGR or leaf development (leaf 2 length was constant; leaf 3 expanded for 2-4 d; leaf 4 emerged and elongated throughout the experiment) during the S...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated whether leaf dark respiration (nonphotorespiratory mitochondrial CO2 release) is inhibited by light in several Poa species, and whether differences in light inhibition between the species are related to differences in the rate of leaf net photosynthesis. Four lowland (Poa annua L., Poa compressa L., Poa pratensis L., and Poa trivial...
Article
Full-text available
Morphochronological variations have been observed in five marine phanerogams of the genus Posidonia in the two regions where they occur (Mediterranean and Western Australia). The occurrence of these variations, which is comparable to that of growth rings in trees (studied in dendrochronology), has provided a basis for developing new techniques for...
Article
Full-text available
Walker, D. I. and Cambridge, M. L. 1994. An experimental assessment of the temperature responses of two sympatric seagrasses, Amphibolis antarctica and Amphibolis griffithii, in relation to their biogeography. Seedlings of the viviparous seagrasses, Amphibolis antarctica (Labill.) Sonder & Aschers. and Amphibolis griffithii (Black) den Hartog, were...
Book
Full-text available
An international workshop on `CO2 and Biosphere' was held in Wageningen, the Netherlands on 15-19 November 1991 as part of the activities of the CO2 Commission of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research: this volume includes 32 papers presented at the workshop. The CO2 Commission stimulates and coordinates a broad range of research pro...
Article
Temperature ranges for survival, growth and sporulation of isolates of 11 Cladophora species from Australia, as well as one isolate from Japan, were tested in constant temperature conditions from 0 to 35°C at 5°C intervals over 3 months. These ranges were compared with those previously determined for Cladophora isolates from the North Atlantic Ocea...
Article
The existence of temperature limits at the geographic distribution boundaries was experimentally examined for four temperate-tropical species of Cladophora (Chlorophyta) in the North Atlantic Ocean; Cladophora vagabunda (L.) van den Hoek, Cladophora dalmatica Kützing, Cladophora albida (Hudson) Kützing and Cladophora ruchingeri (C. Agardh) Kützing....
Article
Full-text available
The existence of temperature limits at the distribution boundaries is examined experimentally for three species of Cladophora in the North Atlantic Ocean: C. pellucida (Hudson) K tzing and C. hutchinsiae (Dillworth) K tzing, found only on European warm temperate coasts, and C. pellucidoidea van den Hoek from warm temperate (to tropical) American co...
Article
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For Cladophora sericea and C. rupestris, northern boundaries are determined by summer temperatures that are too low for adequate growth. Lethal summer temperatures at the S boundaries of both species restrict the extension of their distribution into warmer waters on the N American coast and in the Mediterranean. On the African coast and island grou...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between distribution boundaries and temperature responses of some North AtlanticCladophora species (Chlorophyta) was experimentally examined under various regimes of temperature, light and daylength. Experimentally determined critical temperature intervals, in which survival, growth or reproduction was limited, were compared with a...
Article
This paper examines possible reasons for the extensive loss of seagrass in Cockburn Sound following industrial development. Transplanted seedlings survived poorly in Cockburn Sound compared with an adjoining embayment. Altered temperature, salinity, sedimentation and water movement do not explain the death of seagrass over wide areas, and there is...
Article
The areas of seagrass meadows in Cockburn Sound, a marine embayment in Western Australia, were estimated from historical aerial photographs supplemented by ground surveys, studies on meadows in adjoining areas, and coring for rhizome remains. Ten species of seagrasses with different habitat tolerances are recorded for the area, with Posidonia sinuo...
Article
A critical re-examination of specimens of the seagrass genus Posidonia has resulted in a re-description of Posidonia ostenfeldii den Hartog and the description of four new species from the southern and western Australian coastline: P. denhartogii sp. nov., P. robertsoniae sp. nov., P. coriacea sp. nov. and P. kirkmanii sp. nov.P. ostenfeldii is dis...
Article
Full-text available
The temperature responses for growth and survival have been experimentally tested for 6 species of the green algal genusCladophora (Chlorophyceae; Cladophorales) (all isolated from Roscoff, Brittany, France, one also from Connecticut, USA), selected from 4 distribution groups, in order to determine which phase in the annual temperature regime might...
Article
The male flowers of Halophila engelmanni Ascherson are described and illustrated from near the northern end of the species range. Flowering is discussed with emphasis on environmental factor influencing flower initiation.
Article
Although Cymodocea angustata Ostenfeld was based on a 1914 collection in beach drift at Carnarvon, W.A., it was not collected in situ until 1979 when it was recorded at South Hermite Island in the Monte Bello Islands. In 1982, it was found growing at five sites in Shark Bay. From a comparison of isozymes, secondary compounds and laboratory cultures...
Article
Vegetative propagules for dispersal by waves and currents were produced during summer and autumn by the Australian seagrasses Heterozostera tasmanica (Martens ex Aschers.) den Hartog from the apical meristems of erect stems and in Zostera mucronata den Hartog from intercalary meristems below some nodes on the erect generative shoots.
Article
The vegetative structures of Posidonia sinuosa Cambridge & Kuo have been studied and are compared to those of Posidonia australis Hook. f. and, where possible, the ecological significance of structures is considered. Each shoot of P. sinuosa bears 1–2 leaves which grow more slowly than those of P. australis. The leaf cuticle has a uniformly low ele...
Article
The depletion of dry matter, N and P from seeds of Posidonia australis Hook. f. and Posidonia sinuosa Cambridge et Kuo during germination and seedling establishment is described. Seeds of both species showed essentially the same patterns of depletion, which resembled those of terrestrial plants. Seed reserves of N and P were retrieved with an appar...
Article
Bacterial colonies, fungi and other micro-organisms occur in the rhizosphere and peripheral root tissues of seagrasses of the genus, Posidonia. Fungi penetrate the epidermal cells and lyse the thick polysaccharide materials in the walls of the hypodermal cells. A suberin lamella in the wall of the hypodermal cell is more resistant but fungi and bac...
Article
Full-text available
The accumulation is described of N, P, K, S, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Zn, Mn and Cu in the developing pericarp and seed of two species of seagrass. Both species showed essentially the same patterns, which resemble those of herbaceous terrestrial plants. There was a close relation between dry matter and nutrient accumulation. N, P, K, Fe, Zn, Mn and Cu accum...
Article
Two new species of seagrass, Posidonia sinuosa and Posidonia angustifolia, from southern Australia, are described. These species are sympatric with the broad leaved Posidonia australis Hook. f., under which name they were previously known as “narrow leaved” forms. Morphological, anatomical and ecological data are presented as evidence for the separ...
Article
Rhizome branching of Posidonia australis Hook. f. occurs at irregular intervals in leaf axils, with one or no branch per axil. The cell walls of the rhizome epidermis and hypodermis are slightly thickened and lignified. Cortical cells have many starch grains. Fibre strands and vascular bundles are scattered among the cortical tissues. The cell wall...
Article
New ecological data are given for the nine species of seagrasses of south-western Australia, with special reference to Posidonoa australis in Cockburn Sound, a polluted marine embayment.

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