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Mario Stampanoni Bassi

Mario Stampanoni Bassi
IRCCS Neuromed · Neurology

MD PhD

About

63
Publications
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1,052
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Publications

Publications (63)
Article
Full-text available
(1) Background: The clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is critically influenced by the expression of different pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) represents a major inflammatory molecule previously associated with exacerbated disease activity in relapsing remitting MS (RR-MS); however, the role of single-...
Article
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The clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is critically influenced by the interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism (rs6265), one of the most studied single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), influences brain functioning and neurodegenerative processes in he...
Article
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Long lasting symptoms have been reported in a considerable proportion of patients after a severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. This condition, defined as either “post-acute coronavirus disease (COVID),” “long COVID,” or “long-haul COVID,” has also been described in outpatients and in individuals who are asymptomat...
Article
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Background: Astrocytes and microglia play an important role in the inflammatory process of multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the associations between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) and soluble triggering receptors expressed on myeloid cells-2 (sTREM-2), inflammatory molecules, and clinical charac...
Chapter
In recent years, experimental studies have clarified that immune system influences the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS) in both physiologic and pathologic conditions. The neuro-immune crosstalk plays a crucial role in neuronal development and may be critically involved in mediating CNS response to neuronal damage. Multiple sclerosis...
Article
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Age at onset is the main risk factor for disease progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS). In this cross-sectional study, we explored whether older age is associated with specific disease features involved in the progression independent of relapse activity (PIRA). In 266 patients with RR-MS, the associations betwe...
Article
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Aim We recently proposed miR-142-3p as a molecular player in inflammatory synaptopathy, a new pathogenic hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS) and of its mouse model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), that leads to neuronal loss independently of demyelination. MiR-142-3p seems to be unique among potential biomarker candidates in MS, sin...
Article
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Excessive extracellular concentrations of L-glutamate (L-Glu) can be neurotoxic and contribute to neurodegenerative processes in multiple sclerosis (MS). The association between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) L-Glu levels, clinical features, and inflammatory biomarkers in patients with MS remains unclear. In 179 MS patients (relapsing remitting, RR, n =...
Article
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Exercise is increasingly recommended as a supportive therapy for people with Multiple Sclerosis (pwMS). While clinical research has still not disclosed the real benefits of exercise on MS disease, animal studies suggest a substantial beneficial effect on motor disability and pathological hallmarks such as central and peripheral dysregulated immune...
Article
Neurology, and medicine in general, is torn by opposing tensions: universality, which is the goal of guidelines and protocols derived from clinical trials, and singularity, which personalized medicine seeks to understand. Efforts to demonstrate biological bases of diseases and embrace evidence-based medicine have unwittingly contributed to the reje...
Article
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The identification of microRNAs in biological fluids for diagnosis and prognosis is receiving great attention in the field of multiple sclerosis (MS) research but it is still in its infancy. In the present study, we observed in a large sample of MS patients that let-7b-5p levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were highly correlated with a number...
Article
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Background and Aims Interferon beta (IFNb) is a safe first-line drug commonly used for relapsing-remitting (RR)-MS. Nevertheless, a considerable proportion of patients do not respond to IFNb treatment. Therefore, until now, a number of studies have investigated various markers that could predict the patients who would respond to IFNb therapy. The o...
Article
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Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common neurological disorder of putative autoimmune origin. Clinical and experimental studies delineate abnormal expression of specific cytokines over the course of the disease. One major cytokine that has been shown to play a pivotal role in MS is tumor necrosis factor (TNF). TNF is a pleiotropic cytokine regulating ma...
Article
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Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a new reality for many physiological and pathological functions as an alternative mode of intercellular communication. This is due to their capacity to interact with distant recipient cells, usually involving delivery of the EVs contents into the target cells. Intensive investigation has targeted the role of E...
Article
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In multiple sclerosis (MS), activated T and B lymphocytes and microglial cells release various proinflammatory cytokines, promoting neuroinflammation and negatively affecting the course of the disease. The immune response homeostasis is crucially regulated by the activity of the enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA), as evidenced in patients with geneti...
Article
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In multiple sclerosis (MS), inflammation alters synaptic transmission and plasticity, negatively influencing the disease course. In the present study, we aimed to explore the influence of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β on peculiar features of associative Hebbian synaptic plasticity, such as input specificity, using the paired associative stimul...
Article
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Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been employed in multiple sclerosis (MS) to assess the integrity of the corticospinal tract and the corpus callosum and to explore some physiological properties of the motor cortex. Specific alterations of TMS measures have been strongly associated to different pathophysiological mechanisms, particularly...
Article
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In the past years, several theories have been advanced to explain the pathogenesis of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), a neuropsychiatric disease that causes disability in general population. Several theories have been proposed to define the MDD pathophysiology such as the classic “monoamine-theory” or the “glutamate hypothesis.” All these theories...
Article
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Specific proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory molecules could represent useful cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers to predict the clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS). The proinflammatory molecule interleukin (IL)-6 has been investigated in the pathophysiology of MS and has been associated in previous smaller studies to increased disability...
Article
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Future treatments of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic autoimmune neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS), aim for simultaneous early targeting of peripheral immune function and neuroinflammation. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulators are among the most promising drugs with both “immunological” and “non-immunologi...
Article
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Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by demyelinating white matter lesions and neurodegeneration, with a variable clinical course. Brain network architecture provides efficient information processing and resilience to damage. The peculiar organization characterized by a low numb...
Article
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Studies of brain network connectivity improved understanding on brain changes and adaptation in response to different pathologies. Synaptic plasticity, the ability of neurons to modify their connections, is involved in brain network remodeling following different types of brain damage (e.g., vascular, neurodegenerative, inflammatory). Although syna...
Article
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Objectives: Skill acquisition after motor training involves synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) in primary motor cortex (M1). In multiple sclerosis (MS), LTP failure ensuing from neuroinflammation could contribute to worsen clinical recovery. We therefore addressed whether practice-dependent plasticity is altered in MS. Methods: Eighteen relap...
Article
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Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease. Though a specific antigen has not been identified, it is widely accepted that MS is an autoimmune disorder characterized by myelin-directed immune attack. Pharmacological treatments for MS are based on immunomodulatory or immunosuppressant drugs, designed to attenuate or damp...
Article
Background: Synaptic plasticity helps in reducing the clinical expression of brain damage and represents a useful mechanism to compensate the negative impact of new brain lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). Inflammation, altering synaptic plasticity, could negatively influence the disease course in relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS). Objective: In the...
Article
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Background: Previous studies evidenced a link between metabolic dysregulation, inflammation, and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS). Objectives: To explore whether increased adipocyte mass expressed as body mass index (BMI) and increased serum lipids influence cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammation and disease severity. Methods: In t...
Article
Aims The crucial step in the pathogenic events that lead to the development and the progression of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the infiltration of autoreactive T cells in the brain. Data from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice indicate that, together with microglia, T cells are responsible for the enhancement of the glutamatergic t...
Article
Growing data from human and animal studies indicate the beneficial effects of exercise on several clinical outcomes in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune, demyelinating disease, suggesting that it may slow down the disease progression, by reducing brain damage. However, the mechanisms involved are still elusive. Aim of this study...
Article
Objective: we investigated the effect of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied over the pharyngeal motor area in dysphagia associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Eighteen MS patients with dysphagia associated with brainstem involvement were randomized to receive either "real" or "sham" tDCS. Primary outcome:...
Article
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Introduction: Disease course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is negatively influenced by proinflammatory molecules released by activated T and B lymphocytes and local immune cells. The endovanilloid system plays different physiological functions, and preclinical data suggest that transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) could modulate neuro...
Article
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Background: Clinical deterioration of relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS) patients reflects not only the number and severity of overt inflammatory and demyelinating episodes, but also subtle central damage caused by persistent exposure to inflammatory molecules. Objective: To explore the correlation between levels of CSF inflammatory molecules at the...
Article
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The endocannabinoid system (ECS) has been recently recognized as a prominent promoter of the emotional homeostasis, mediating the effects of different environmental signals including rewarding and stressing stimuli. The ECS modulates the rewarding effects of environmental stimuli, influencing synaptic transmission in the dopaminergic projections to...
Article
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Aging is one of the main risk factors for the development of many neurodegenerative diseases. Emerging evidence has acknowledged neuroinflammation as potential trigger of the functional changes occurring during normal and pathological aging. Two main determinants have been recognized to cogently contribute to neuroinflammation in the aging brain, i...
Article
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Cytokines are constitutively released in the healthy brain by resident myeloid cells to keep proper synaptic plasticity, either in the form of Hebbian synaptic plasticity or of homeostatic plasticity. However, when cytokines dramatically increase, establishing a status of neuroinflammation, the synaptic action of such molecules remarkably interfere...
Article
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Background: In the early phases of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS), a clear correlation between brain lesion load and clinical disability is often lacking, originating the so-called clinico-radiological paradox. Different factors may contribute to such discrepancy. In particular, synaptic plasticity may reduce the clinical expressio...
Article
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Neurons in the central nervous system are organized in functional units interconnected to form complex networks. Acute and chronic brain damage disrupts brain connectivity producing neurological signs and/or symptoms. In several neurological diseases, particularly in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), structural imaging studies cannot always demonstrate a cl...
Article
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Cognitive deficits are frequently observed in multiple sclerosis (MS), mainly involving processing speed and episodic memory. Both demyelination and gray matter atrophy can contribute to cognitive deficits in MS. In recent years, neuroinflammation is emerging as a new factor influencing clinical course in MS. Inflammatory cytokines induce synaptic...
Article
Central neuropathic pain (CNP) is common and disabling among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The pathological mechanisms underlying CNP in MS are not well understood. We explored whether NGF is implicated in the pathogenesis of CNP in MS. We measured NGF concentration in the CSF of 73 patients affected by MS, 15 with and 58 without CNP and 1...
Article
Background: Synaptic plasticity, the basic mechanism of clinical recovery after brain lesion, can also remarkably influence the clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Physical rehabilitation represents the main treatment option to promote synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) and to enhance spontaneous recovery of neurological deficits. Obje...
Article
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory immune-mediate disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), primarily affecting the myelin sheath and followed by neurodegeneration. Synaptic alterations are emerging as critical determinants of early neurodegeneration in MS. Inflammation-induced alterations of synaptic transmission and plasticity have be...
Article
Question Voluntary movement control and execution are regulated by the influence of the cerebellar output over different interconnected cortical areas, through dentato-thalamo connections. However, in humans, connectivity and plasticity dynamics of the cerebellar-thalamo-cortical connections have been only indirectly explored. Methods In the prese...
Article
Question Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) represents an effective therapy in Parkinson’s disease (PD). The effects of STN-DBS on cortical reactivity are still poorly understood. By combining transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG), we explored the effects of STN-DBS either alone or in co...
Poster
Full-text available
Voluntary movement control and execution are regulated by the influence of the cerebellar output over different interconnected cortical areas, through dentato-thalamo connections. In the present study we applied in a group of healthy volunteers transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to directly assess the effects o...
Article
Full-text available
The endocannabinoid system plays a regulatory role in a number of physiological processes and has been found altered in different pathological conditions, including movement disorders. The interactions between cannabinoids and dopamine in the basal ganglia are remarkably complex and involve both the modulation of other neurotransmitters (γ-aminobut...
Article
Full-text available
Voluntary movement control and execution are regulated by the influence of the cerebellar output over different interconnected cortical areas, through dentato-thalamo connections. In the present study we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to directly assess the effects of cerebellar theta-burst stimulat...
Article
The aims of the present experiment was to investigate: (a) if transient disruption of neural activity in the right (RTP) or left temporal pole (LTP) can interfere with the development of a familiarity feeling to the presentation of faces/written names of famous/unknown people; and (b) if this interference specifically affects the familiarity for fa...
Article
Disorders of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) have a variable degree of clinical relevance in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we assessed whether subclinical autonomic dysfunction, as evaluated by a complete battery of autonomic function tests (AFTs), correlates with PD progression. A series of 27 consecutive patients with PD underw...
Article
Full-text available
Levodopa-induced dyskinesias are disabling motor complications of long-term dopamine replacement in patients with Parkinson’s disease. In recent years, several alternative models have been proposed to explain the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this hyperkinetic motor disorder. In particular, our group has shed new light on the role of the...
Article
Full-text available
In Parkinson's disease (PD), several studies have detected an impaired serotonin (5-HT) pathway, likely affecting both motor and non-motor domains. However, the precise impact of 5-HT impairment is far from established. Here, we have used a HPLC chromatographic method, in a homogenous cohort (n = 35) of non fluctuating, non dyskinetic PD patients,...
Article
Full-text available
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an efficacious therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) but its effects on non-motor facets may be detrimental. The low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN or the nucleus tegmenti pedunculopontini - PPTg-) opened new perspectives. In our hands, PPTg-LFS reveal...
Article
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Information about patients' adherence to therapy represents a primary issue in Parkinson's disease (PD) management. To perform the linguistic validation of the Italian version of the self-rated 8-Item Morisky Medical Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) and to describe in a sample of Italian patients affected by PD the adherence to anti-Parkinson drug therapy...
Article
With the increase of human lifespan and refinement of diagnostic techniques dementia, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular, have become a multi-decade process with a complex pathogenesis. The prognosis of AD patients, especially in late stages, may be strongly influenced by factors that go far beyond the well-recognized cascades (tau depositi...
Article
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Recently, it is under scrutiny the possibility to anticipate the stereotactic implantation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) even in relatively mild Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with an unsatisfying response to drugs. In addition, it is debated whether levodopa (LD) and deep brain stimulation (DBS) are congruent or, instead, mutually exclusive....
Article
Full-text available
At odd with traditional views, effective sub-thalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS), in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, may increase the discharge rate of the substantia nigra pars reticulata and the internal globus pallidus (GPi), in combination with increased cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels. How these changes affect t...

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