Marina Doris Meixner

Marina Doris Meixner
Landesbetrieb Landwirtschaft Hessen · Bieneninstitut Kirchhain

Dr.

About

107
Publications
62,240
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4,863
Citations
Citations since 2017
39 Research Items
2955 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600
Additional affiliations
June 2002 - February 2007
Washington State University

Publications

Publications (107)
Article
Full-text available
Background: Whole-genome sequencing has become routine for population genetic studies. Sequencing of individuals provides maximal data but is rather expensive and fewer samples can be studied. In contrast, sequencing a pool of samples (pool-seq) can provide sufficient data, while presenting less of an economic challenge. Few studies have compared...
Article
Full-text available
EurBeST — A Pilot Study Testing Varroa-resistant Bees Under Commercial Beekeeping Conditions.
Method
Full-text available
EURBEST KSIĄŻKA METOD OCENY PSZCZELARZE PROWADZĄCY OCENĘ STACJONARNĄ PT Uzunov et., 2021
Method
Full-text available
EURBEST KSIĄŻKA METOD OCENY PSZCZELARZE PROWADZĄCY OCENĘ TERENOWĄ Uzunov et al., 2021
Article
Full-text available
Background With numerous endemic subspecies representing four of its five evolutionary lineages, Europe holds a large fraction of Apis mellifera genetic diversity. This diversity and the natural distribution range have been altered by anthropogenic factors. The conservation of this natural heritage relies on the availability of accurate tools for s...
Article
Full-text available
Sublethal doses of pesticides affect individual honeybees, but colony-level effects are less well understood and it is unclear how the two levels integrate. We studied the effect of the neonicotinoid pesticide clothianidin at field realistic concentrations on small colonies. We found that exposure to clothianidin affected worker jelly production of...
Article
Sublethal doses of pesticides affect individual honeybees, but colony-level effects are less well understood and it is unclear how the two levels integrate. We studied the effect of the neonicotinoid pesticide clothianidin at field realistic concentrations on small colonies. We found that exposure to clothianidin affected worker jelly production of...
Article
Full-text available
Developing resistance to the varroa mite in honey bees is a major goal for apicultural science and practice, the development of selection strategies and the availability of resistant stock. Here we present an extended literature review and survey of resistant populations and selection programs in the EU and elsewhere, including expert interviews. W...
Article
Apis mellifera ruttneri is the endemic honey bee subspecies of the Maltese Islands. This population is endangered by hybridization with other honey bee subspecies that are frequently imported by beekeepers. It deserves conservation because of its unique behavioral traits including adaptation to the local climate. Conservation of honey bee subspecie...
Article
Full-text available
In the fight against the Varroa destructor mite, selective breeding of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) populations that are resistant to the parasitic mite stands as a sustainable solution. Selection initiatives indicate that using the suppressed mite reproduction (SMR) trait as a selection criterion is a suitable tool to breed such resistant bee pop...
Article
Full-text available
Most Varroa induced colony losses occur during the autumn or winter season as a consequence of an elevated Varroa infestation level and an insufficient health status of the adult bees. Even with an initial low Varroa infestation in early spring, critical mite and virus infection levels can be reached before winter if colonies continuously rear broo...
Article
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Modern techniques of selective breeding show high potential to improve economically important traits of honey bees. However, breeding may neglect fundamental rules of natural selection. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of selection and local adaptation on some relevant breeding traits of Apis mellifera carnica. We compared ope...
Article
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Solitary bees are frequently exposed to pesticides, which are considered as one of the main stress factors that may lead to population declines. A strong immune defence is vital for the fitness of bees. However, the immune system can be weakened by environmental factors that may render bees more vulnerable to parasites and pathogens. Here we demons...
Poster
Full-text available
On the graph on the left 3000+ honey bees collected across Europe are differentiated into subspecies and local ecotypes using the 4000+ SNPs developed in SmartBees. In the top a cluster of samples consisting of O-lineage bees, to the right M-lineage bees, to the left C-lineage bees and central the A-lineage bees. Subspecies that appear in close pro...
Book
Varroa destructor is probably the most serious cause of European honey bee ( Apis mellifera ) losses on a global level. However, the presence of untreated survivor populations in many different regions support the idea of selecting resistant stock. Recently, the European Commission requested a study on the present status of breeding activities rega...
Article
To explore genotype-environment-interactions in honey bees, the survival and performance of 597 colonies, representing five subspecies and 16 different genotypes, were comparatively studied in the framework of the COLOSS project. The study was carried out from 2009 to 2012 in 21 apiaries across Europe. The colonies were continuously assessed for tr...
Article
Full-text available
Clothianidin is a commonly used systemic insecticide in seed treatments. Residues of clothianidin can occur in nectar and pollen as a result of within-plant-translocation. Foraging bees can collect contaminated nectar or pollen. Concerns have been brought forward that exposure to pesticide residues might affect colonies especially if they are weake...
Research
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Apis mellifera ruttneri, the honey bee subspecies endemic to Malta, must be regarded as seriously endangered. However, there is a critical need for scientific data to support and guide conservation measures, since only two scientific papers concerning this subspecies were published since its original description in 1997. To this end in June 2017, a...
Article
Full-text available
Apis mellifera ruttneri is the endemic honey bee of Malta where more than 4000 colonies are managed on the main islands of Malta, Gozo and Comino. It is believed that beekeeping has been practiced in Malta since the Punic times. Ancient Roman apiaries dating over 2000 years are a living evidence of such practices which are well preserved to this da...
Article
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Deformed wing virus (DWV) is an important pathogen in a broad range of insects, including honey bees. Concordant with the spread of Varroa, DWV is present in the majority of honey bee colonies and can result in either low-level infections with asymptomatic bees that nonetheless exhibit increased colony loss under stress, or high-level infections wi...
Data
DWV and SBV titers in different experiment. The virus titer for the three experiments are deposited in the supplementary file. (XLSX)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Apis mellifera ruttneri, the honey bee subspecies endemic to Malta, must be regarded as critically endangered. First, the arrival of the Varroa mite in the 1990's had devastating effects on the number of colonies, and nowadays increasing pressure from importations of selected commercial stock (A. m. ligustica, A. m. carnica, Buckfast) is leading to...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Apis mellifera ruttneri is an endemic honeybee confined to the Maltese Islands and is one of just ten honey bee sub-species described in Europe. It is an important receptacle of environmental adaptations and if it is to thrive, it is essential that suitable habitats that can provide adequate foraging, with minimal exposure to competitors and pathog...
Article
The status of Apis mellifera ruttneri, an endemic honey bee of the Maltese islands, was uncertain after a series of devastating Varroa mite infestations followed by ill-conceived replacement programs. Morphometric analysis, which was the method originally used to identify this honey bee subspecies, was carried out using 33 different parameters. Thi...
Article
Full-text available
In cases of acute intoxication, honeybees often lay in front of their hives for several days, exposed to sunlight and weather, before a beekeeper can take a sample. Beekeepers send samples to analytical laboratories, but sometimes no residues can be detected. Temperature and sun light could influence the decrease of pesticides in bee samples and th...
Article
Full-text available
Queen health is crucial to colony survival of honeybees, since reproduction and colony growth rely solely on the queen. Queen failure is considered a relevant cause of colony losses, yet few data exist concerning effects of environmental stressors on queens. Here we demonstrate for the first time that exposure to field-realistic concentrations of n...
Article
The cover image, by Reinhold Siede et al., is based on the Research Article Performance of honey bee colonies under a long‐lasting dietary exposure to sublethal concentrations of the neonicotinoid insecticide thiacloprid†, DOI: 10.1002/ps.4547.
Article
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Wolbachia are widely distributed bacterial endosymbionts of arthropods and filarial nematodes. These bacteria can affect host fitness in a variety of ways, such as protecting hosts against viruses and other pathogens. Here we investigate the possible role of Wolbachia in the prevalence of the deformed wing virus (DWV), a highly virulent pathogen of...
Article
Background: Substantial honey bee colony losses have occurred periodically in the last decades. The drivers for these losses are not fully understood. The influence of pests and pathogens are beyond dispute, but in addition, chronic exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of pesticides has been suggested to affect the performance of honey bee coloni...
Article
Full-text available
Deformed wing virus is an important contributor to honey bee colony losses. Frequently queen failure is reported as a cause for colony loss. Here we examine whether sexual transmission during multiple matings of queens is a possible way of virus infection in queens. In an environment with high prevalence of deformed wing virus, queens (n = 30) were...
Article
A strong immune defense is vital for honey bee health and colony survival. This defense can be weakened by environmental factors that may render honey bees more vulnerable to parasites and pathogens. Honey bees are frequently exposed to neonicotinoid pesticides, which are being discussed as one of the stress factors that may lead to colony failure....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In honey bees, multiple mating of queens with often more than 20 drones, known as polyandry, is extreme. At the colony level, polyandry can provide fitness gains through better division of labor and disease resistance. For the honey bee queen polyandry may pose a risk, for instance through sexually transmitted diseases. Deformed wing virus (DWV) is...
Article
Full-text available
Honey bee virus prevalence data are an essential prerequisite for managing epidemic events in a population. A survey study was carried out for seven viruses in colonies representing a healthy Danish honey bee population. In addition, colonies from apiaries with high level Varroa infestation or high level of winter mortality were also surveyed. Resu...
Article
Full-text available
The honey bee Apis mellifera, of which there are currently 28 identified subspecies and numerous ecotypes, have been evolving and adapting to a wide range of environments for hundreds of thousands of years within their native range of Europe, Africa and Asia. Honey bees have been widely dispersed over the past several hundred years and are now also...
Article
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Honey bee surveillance systems are increasingly used to characterize honey bee health and disease burdens of bees in different regions and/or over time. In addition to quantifying disease prevalence, surveillance systems can identify risk factors associated with colony morbidity and mortality. Surveillance systems are often observational, and prove...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Honey bee colony losses have risen seriously in the past decade, especially in the USA. In Europe, average loss rates appear less dramatic and high losses occur less frequently; still, high losses may happen on a regional scale. Scientists and beekeepers are struggling to find answers to this problem. Queen loss and infertility is frequently consid...
Conference Paper
cecilia.costa@entecra.it The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of genotype-environment interactions on the survival, performance and disease susceptibility of honey bee colonies headed by queens originating from several areas in Europe. We included 16 different genotypes from different backgrounds (some from breeding programs with s...
Article
Full-text available
We used radio-frequency identification (RFID) to record the duration and frequency of nuptial flights of honey bee queens (Apis mellifera carnica) at two mainland mating apiaries. We investigated the effect of a number of factors on flight duration and frequency: mating apiary, number of drone colonies, queen’s age and temperature. We found signifi...
Article
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The genetic variability of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) from south eastern Europe was investigated using microsatellite analyses of 107 samples from Albania, the Republic of Macedonia, Greece and Bulgaria together with 42 reference samples (Apis mellifera carnica) from Slovenia. Genetic structure and spatial analyses of the microsatellite data sh...
Article
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The COLOSS GEI (Genotype-Environment Interactions) Experiment was setup to further our understanding of recent honey bee colony losses. The main objective of the GEI experiment was to understand the effects of environmental factors on the vitality of European honey bee genotypes. This paper aims to describe the genetic background and population all...
Article
Full-text available
The survival and performance of 597 honey bee colonies, representing five subspecies and 16 different genotypes, were comparatively studied in 20 apiaries across Europe. Started in October 2009, 15.7% of the colonies survived without any therapeutic treatment against diseases until spring 2012. The survival duration was strongly affected by environ...
Article
Full-text available
An international collaborative experiment was run from 2009 to 2012 (Costa et al., 2012) with the aim of understanding genotype-environment effects on survival and health status of honey bee colonies headed by queens of different European origins that were tested in various locations under differing environmental conditions. No chemical treatment a...
Article
Full-text available
Adaptation of honey bees to their environment is expressed by the annual development pattern of the colony, the balance with food sources and the host -parasite balance, all of which interact among each other with changes in the environment. In the present study, we analyse the development patterns over a period of two years in colonies belonging t...
Article
Full-text available
Honey bee colonies exhibit a wide range of variation in their behaviour, depending on their genetic origin and environmental factors. The COLOSS Genotype-Environment Interactions Experiment gave us the opportunity to investigate the phenotypic expression of the swarming, defensive and hygienic behaviour of 16 genotypes from five different honey bee...
Article
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Although knowledge about honey bee geographic and genetic diversity has increased tremendously in recent decades, the adaptation of honey bees to their local environment has not been well studied. The current demand for high economic performance of bee colonies with desirable behavioural characteristics contributes to changing the natural diversity...
Article
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Diseases are known to be one of the major contributors to colony losses. Within a Europe-wide experiment on genotype - environment interactions, an initial 621 colonies were set up and maintained from 2009 to 2012. The colonies were monitored to investigate the occurrence and levels of key pathogens. These included the mite Varroa destructor (mites...
Article
Full-text available
Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is known as a disease of worker honey bees. To investigate pathogenesis of the CBPV on the queen, the sole reproductive individual in a colony, we conducted experiments regarding the susceptibility of queens to CBPV. Results from susceptibility experiment showed a similar disease progress in the queens compared to...
Article
Full-text available
The natural diversity of honey bees in Europe is eroding fast. A multitude of reasons lead to a loss of both genetic diversity and specific adaptations to local conditions. To preserve locally adapted bees through breeding efforts and to maintain regional strains in conservation areas, these valuable populations need to be identified. In this paper...
Article
Full-text available
Honey bee colony losses of the last decade have been alarming. Besides the most critical factors, such as parasites and pathogens, losses have been claimed to be linked to immunodeficiency. For the evaluation of this suggestion powerful immunological tests are required. The aim of this study was to obtain further data to characterize common markers...
Article
Full-text available
An international experiment to estimate the importance of genotype-environment interactions on vitality and performance of honey bees and on colony losses was run between July 2009 and March 2012. Altogether 621 bee colonies, involving 16 different genetic origins of European honey bees, were tested in 21 locations spread in 11 countries. The genet...
Poster
Full-text available
Inland mating stations play an important role for bee breeding in Germany although it is generally assumed that they are not as reliable as islands mating yards. Former experiments have shown that the reliability of inland mating stations can be considerably improved by increasing the number of drone colonies. But although drone aggregation areas i...