Mariko Kikutani

Mariko Kikutani
Kanazawa University | Kindai · Institute of Liberal Arts and Science

Doctor of Psychology

About

23
Publications
8,483
Reads
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229
Citations
Citations since 2017
15 Research Items
148 Citations
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Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated how daily behaviors of Japanese people changed during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic and whether the change was mediated by demographics. It also examined whether the magnitude of behavior change in a demographic group is related to their attitudes towards the COVID-19 vaccine. 301 Japanese responded to an online...
Preprint
p> Background: The spread of COVID-19 has changed people’s everyday behaviors. The present research aimed to describe the dynamics of changes experienced by Japanese people with varying demographic backgrounds, aiming to reveal how those demographic features mediate the behavior changes caused by the pandemic. While most past studies investigatin...
Preprint
p> Background: The spread of COVID-19 has changed people’s everyday behaviors. The present research aimed to describe the dynamics of changes experienced by Japanese people with varying demographic backgrounds, aiming to reveal how those demographic features mediate the behavior changes caused by the pandemic. While most past studies investigatin...
Article
Full-text available
Engaging in leisure activities promotes mental health. The effect is likely associated with resilience as the broaden‐and‐build theory suggests positive emotions elicited from leisure increase mental resources for stress coping. The present research examined whether participating in different leisure activities at a given time increases the level o...
Article
Full-text available
Even when a person is portraying a neutral expression, their internal feelings can be reflected subtly on their face, and observers can perceive them. A previous study took facial photographs of female models while wearing attractive and unattractive clothing. Although the models displayed neutral expressions for both cases, their faces while weari...
Article
Full-text available
The concept of emotion can be organized within a hypothetical space comprising a limited number of dimensions representing essential properties of emotion. The present study examined cultural influences on such conceptual structure by comparing the performance of emotion word classification between Japanese and Korean individuals. Two types of emot...
Article
Full-text available
This research investigated how we detect emotion in speech when the emotional cues in the sound of voice do not match the semantic content. It examined the dominance of the voice or semantics in the perception of emotion from incongruent speech and the influence of language on the interaction between the two modalities. Japanese participants heard...
Article
Full-text available
The picture-word task presents participants with a number of pictured objects together with a written distractor word superimposed upon each picture, and their task is to name the depicted object while ignoring the distractor word. Depending on the specific picture and word combination, various effects, including the identity facilitation effect (e...
Book
Shame is one of the most stigmatized and stigmatizing of emotions. Often characterized as an emotion in which the subject holds a global, negative self-assessment, shame is typically understood to mark the subject as being inadequate in some way, and a sizable amount of work on shame focuses on its problematic or unhealthy aspects, effects, or cons...
Article
Full-text available
Voice quality refers to the auditory impression (e.g., hoarse and nasal) the listener experiences from a piece of speech, and it provides information about the speaker such as his/her physical characteristics, age, and emotional state. The present study aimed to develop a scale in English language to measure how we perceive qualities of emotional v...
Article
Full-text available
This study targeted individuals from Korea and Japan to investigate whether their concepts of emotion can be classified as more prototypical (central concepts) and less typical exemplars (peripheral concepts), and how they distinguish them. In Study 1, participants listed examples of “emotion,” and the most frequently reported words were defined as...
Article
According to one important set of theories, different domains of immorality are linked to different discrete emotions—panculturally. Violations against the community elicit contempt, whereas violations against an individual elicit anger. To test this theory, American, Indian and Japanese participants (N = 480) indicated contempt and anger reactions...
Article
Full-text available
Research on Japanese reading has generally indicated that processing of the logographic script Kanji primarily involves whole-word lexical processing and follows a semantics-to-phonology route, while the two phonological scripts Hiragana and Katakana (collectively called Kana) are processed via a sub-lexical route, and more in a phonology-to-semant...
Article
The reported experiment investigated memory of unfamiliar faces and how it is influenced by race, facial expression, direction of gaze, and observers' level of social anxiety. Eighty- seven Japanese participants initially memorized images of Oriental and Caucasian faces displaying either happy or angry expressions with direct or averted gaze. They...
Article
The present online study was designed to investigate whether the expected flavor associated with a colored beverage is affected by the type of receptacle in which the drink is presented. More than 400 participants from France, Japan and Norway viewed photographs of red, green, yellow, blue, orange, brown and clear beverages presented in a water gla...
Article
Full-text available
Visualizing oneself engaging in future actions has been shown to increase the likelihood of actually engaging in the visualized action. In three studies, we examined the effect of perspective taken to visualize a future action (first-person vs. third-person) as a function of the degree to which individuals worry about others’ evaluation of themselv...
Article
Three studies investigated developmental changes in facial expression processing, between 3years-of-age and adulthood. For adults and older children, the addition of sunglasses to upright faces caused an equivalent decrement in performance to face inversion. However, younger children showed better classification of expressions of faces wearing sung...
Article
We review evidence that language is involved in the establishment and maintenance of adult categories of facial expressions of emotion. We argue that individual and group differences in facial expression interpretation are too great for a fully specified system of categories to be universal and hardwired. Variations in expression categorization, ac...
Article
Robust findings show that categorical perception (CP) occurs in identification of familiar faces. CP has also been observed for unfamiliar morphed faces after sufficient learning of the original, unmorphed faces has taken place. We previously suggested that CP arises when the activation of inconsistent visual and verbal representations creates a co...
Article
The conditions under which categorical perception (CP) occurs for unfamiliar faces are unclear. Although CP is generally found only for familiar faces, it has been reported for unfamiliar faces after brief training (Levin & Beale, 2000) or even without any learning of the original faces (Campanella, Hanoteau, Seron, Joassin, & Bruyer, 2003). Three...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
I've done some face memory experiments with two independent variables (one within and one between) with two levels each. For each person's facial image I varied quality in four different ways. I used approximately 80 faces in total. I initially ran ANOVA on accuracy calculated per participant, and now I am trying to run the similar analysis with item-based accuracies.
I've tried to calculate proportion of correct responses for each of the four conditions for each face and realised that there were only 11 responses per condition due to randomization. The accuracy I want to know should be "number of participants who correctly responded to the item/ 11", but isn't 11 too small as a sample size?
Consequently, some significant results I had on participant-based analysis did not appear on the item-based analysis.
I think it is reasonable to run item-based analysis if more people responded to each occasion (maybe 30?), but stimulus randomization was prioritized for this study so there were not so many participants who saw the same face in the same condition. Could anyone tell me how many responses would I need per condition to run reliable item-based ANOVA?
Question
I have a question about calculation of response bias for a old/new recognition memory task I've done. In this task participants memorized 12 red shapes and 12 blue shapes first. Then, in the next phase of the task, they were presented with those 24 items and 24 new items and responded whether they were old or new.  Importantly, all the shapes in the recognition phase were black colour. I'm investigating whether the recognition accuracy differ for red and blue items at encoding stage, but I have a problem with calculating false alarm and response bias. Since there was no colour distinction at recognition stage I cannot calculate false alarm separately for the red and blue items.
Is there any way to correct response bias for this task?
Thank you.

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