Marie Vagner

Marie Vagner
French National Centre for Scientific Research | CNRS · UMR 6539 LEMAR (Laboratory of Marine Environment) Plouzané France

Ph. D

About

35
Publications
4,684
Reads
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564
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - present
French National Centre for Scientific Research
Position
  • Researcher
February 2016 - August 2018
French National Centre for Scientific Research
Position
  • Researcher
September 2014 - December 2014
La Rochelle Université
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Plastic pollution in marine ecosystems constitutes an important threat to marine life. For vertebrates, macro/microplastics can obstruct and/or transit into the airways and digestive tract whereas nanoplastics (NPs; < 1000 nm) have been observed in non-digestive tissues such as the liver and brain. Whether NPs cross the intestinal epithelium to gai...
Article
Full-text available
Deepwater redfish Sebastes mentella will be among the most important resource-sustaining commercial bottom-fish fisheries in the years to come in the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence (EGSL). In 2011, 2012, and 2013, three strong cohorts were recruited to the stock; their abundance in 2018 was 80 times higher than that of the 1993–2012 period. The m...
Article
Seafood is well recognized as a major source of Long Chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (LC n-3 PUFA, especially ecosapentaenoic acid, i.e. EPA and docosaheaxaenoic acid, i.e. DHA) and essential trace elements (As, Cu, Fe, Mn, Se, and Zn). It is also a source of non-essential trace elements (Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb) that can be deleterious for health eve...
Article
In ectotherms, it is well described that thermal acclimation induces compensatory adjustments maintaining mitochondrial functions across large shifts in temperature. However, until now, studies mostly focused on fluxes of oxygen without knowing whether mitochondrial efficiency to produce ATP (ATP/O ratio) is also dependent on temperature acclimatio...
Article
Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) are health beneficial lipids found in high concentration in pelagic fishes, including Atlantic mackerel. While EPA and DHA are sensitive to oxidation during fish storage and processing, post-mortem degradation in the first hours following fish death is poo...
Article
An important, but underappreciated, consequence of climate change is the reduction in crucial nutrient production at the base of the marine food chain: the long-chain omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (n-3 HUFA). This can have dramatic consequences on consumers, such as fish as they have limited capacity to synthesise n-3 HUFA de novo. The n-3...
Article
An important, but underappreciated, consequence of climate change is the reduction in crucial nutrient production at the base of the marine food chain: the long-chain omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (n-3 HUFA). This can have dramatic consequences on consumers, such as fish as they have limited capacity to synthesise n-3 HUFA de novo. The n-3...
Article
Full-text available
Determining the lipid content and fatty acid (FA) composition of aquatic organisms has been of major interest in trophic ecology, aquaculture, and nutrition for over half a century. Although protocols for lipid analysis are well-described, their application to aquatic sciences often requires modifications to adapt to field conditions and to sample...
Article
This study aims at (1) experimentally estimating first sexual maturation of the European sardine S. pilchardus, (2) using the results to calibrate existing bioenergetic models. During the 183 days-experiment, fish growth and body condition were assessed by biometry, and gonads were weighed when present. Age, total length and wet weight at first mat...
Article
The role of phenotypic plasticity in the acclimation and adaptive potential of an organism to global change is not currently accounted for in prediction models. The high plasticity of marine fishes is mainly attributed to their early stages, during which morphological, structural and behavioural functions are particularly sensitive to environmental...
Article
Highly unsaturated fatty acids of the omega-3 series (HUFA) are major constituents of cell membranes, yet poorly synthesised de novo by consumers. Their production, mainly supported by aquatic microalgae, has been decreasing with global change. Understanding the consequences of such reductions is essential for ectotherm consumers, since temperature...
Poster
There is increasing evidence that climate change critically depletes crucial nutrients in food web. In particular, a reduction in the production of Omega 3 fatty acids in microalgae as a result of climate change can alter the fatty acid composition of biological membranes of consumers. This is particularly true for marine fish as they are unable to...
Poster
Full-text available
Recently, we observed that high-temperature acclimation under a low-omega3 diet, as expected under global change, increases energy expenditure during swimming in the golden grey mullet, a fish of high ecological value in temperate coastal areas. Here we focus on the underlying mechanisms governing this metabolic response at the individual level, pa...
Article
Full-text available
The objective of this study was to evaluate the combined effects of thermal acclimation and n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (n-3 HUFA) content of the food source on the aerobic capacities of fish in a thermal changing environment. The model used was the golden grey mullet Liza aurata, a species of high ecological importance in temperate coastal...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes are increasingly used to study the trophic relationships in marine ecosystems. The pilchard Sardina pilchardus is a key species among small pelagic fish in the functioning of marine pelagic food webs in the Northeastern Atlantic Ocean. Pilchards were caught in 2014 in the Bay of Biscay and were maintained during...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we hypothesised that a reduction in n-3 HUFA availability for higher consumers, as expected with global change, would negatively impact the physiological performances of fish. The aim was to experimentally evaluate the effect of n-3 HUFA dietary content on cardio-respiratory performances of the golden grey mullet (Liza aurata), a mic...
Article
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a dietary highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA) deficiency on winter flounder Pseudopleuronectes americanus metamorphosis by examining the growth and the expression of genes involved in some key metabolic processes: lipid digestion, oxidative stress, and growth. Three groups of fish were fed rotife...
Article
The aim of this study was to better understand the molecular events governing ontogeny in winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus (Walbaum, 1792)). The expression of seven genes involved in key metabolic processes during metamorphosis were measured at settlement (S0), at 15 (S15), and 30 (S30) days after settlement and compared with those in...
Article
Full-text available
Greenland halibut, especially juveniles, are frequently found in severely hypoxic areas (18–25% saturation) of the St. Lawrence Estuary. We investigated the tolerance of this species to hypoxia and evaluated the consequences of low oxygen levels on metabolic capacity. At 5°C, juveniles had a higher critical oxygen threshold than adults (15 vs 11% s...
Article
Full-text available
Growth performance and reduced stress response are traits of major interest in fish production. Growth and stress-related quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been already identified in several salmonid species, but little effort has been devoted to charrs (genus Salvelinus). Moreover, most QTL studies to date focused on one or very few traits, and l...
Article
Full-text available
A linkage map of 40 linkage groups (LGs) was developed for brook charr, Salvelinus fontinalis, using an F(2) interstrain hybrid progeny (n = 171) and 256 coding gene SNP developed specifically for brook charr and validated from a large (>1000) subset of putative SNP, as well as 81 microsatellite markers. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) re...
Article
Full-text available
There is currently considerable interest in understanding how the biosynthetic pathways of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) are regulated in fish. The aim is to know if it is possible to replace fish oils (FO), rich in HUFA, by vegetable oils (VO), poor in HUFA and rich in their 18 carbon fatty acid precursors, in the feed of cultured fish spe...
Article
Full-text available
Four replicated groups of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) larvae were fed diets containing an extra-high level of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) (XH; 3.7 % EPA+DHA), a high level of HUFA (HH; 1.7 %), a low level of HUFA (LH; 0.7 %) or an extra-low level of HUFA (XLH; 0.5 %) from day 6 to day 45 (experiment 1; XH1, HH1, LH1, XLH1). After a su...
Article
Full-text available
Flathead grey mullets Mugil cephalus are commonly found in Mediterranean lagoons, which are regularly subject to high environmental variations. Oxygen is one of the factors that shows extremely high variation. The objective of this study was to test the effects of acute hypoxia exposure at two experimental temperatures (i.e. 20 and 30°C) on the sta...
Article
The purpose of this study was to check if it is possible to influence sea bass juvenile metabolism by a conditioning of larvae from day 6 post hatching to day 45 to a low or a high HUFA compound diet (LH, 0.8% EPA + DHA and HH, 2.2% EPA + DHA) when reared at 16 or 22 °C. Following a 3-month intermediate period (at 19 °C using a commercial diet), th...
Article
The purpose of this study was to investigate the combined effect of the incorporation of vegetable products in diet and temperature on enzymatic pathways for high unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) desaturation in sea bass larvae. Four replicated groups were fed a low (LH; 0.8% EPA+DHA) or a high (HH; 2.2% EPA+DHA) n-3 HUFA microparticulated diet from...
Article
Full-text available
Worldwide supplies of fish oils and meals have reached their sustainable limits, forcing industries to look for alternative lipid sources for use in marine fish diets. As terrestrial animal products are prohibited, there is great interest in aquaculture to produce fish better able to utilise vegetable feedstuffs. Vegetable products are rich in 18 c...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
PAMPAS focuses on the future of the coastal marshes of Charente-Maritime and their management against the marine submersion hazard. This project makes the choice to approach this question through the prism of the patrimonial identity to go beyond the classical approaches of evaluation of the conservation ecology, of the economy and of the management of the cultural heritage, all considered insufficient to apprehend the heritage, understood as the particular articulation between the components of a marsh participating in its collective identity. PAMPAS therefore aims to lift this lock by an interdisciplinary approach applied to three study areas (the marshes of Fier d’Ars, Tasdon, and Brouage), contrasting both in terms of natural heritage, cultural, landscape and management (dikes, in project of reopening to the sea, in debate of laissez-faire or diking, respectively). Built on a collective approach (co-coordinated by four researchers) and participatory engineering (interdisciplinary co-construction workshop) allowing to cross the expertise in Human and Social Sciences, Life Sciences and Earth Sciences and those of the managers of marsh (49 people from 13 units, 9 disciplines), PAMPAS focuses on three major objectives: 1) to characterize the natural functions (biodiversity, biogeochemical functioning and ecosystem functions), cultural (heritage trajectory of property) and landscape (recognition landscape elements by the users and development) of the marshes and integrate these different components into a spatial representation of the heritage identity; 2) to define from the socio-ecosystem point of view, the response of these components to the marine submersion hazard: after having characterized physically the submersion hazard, the study of the short-term effects on the heritage components will help to develop a global representation of the socio-ecosystem both in terms of functionalities, services, but also in terms of resilience or ability to adapt to the hazard. The effects at the 100-year scale will also be addressed through the past evolution of territories characterized by contrasting hydrodynamic contexts. 3) these results will be confronted with the different management practices on the selected sites in order to define evolution scenarios of their heritage identity and evaluate their adaptive potential. This axis includes (i) an analysis of the management methods determining the possible evolutions of the patrimonial identity, following the submersion, (ii) a discussion of the results with managers and the locally elected representatives, using an interactive tool of cartography and focus groups, to discuss the transition of these territories and adaptive management modalities of marshes, and (iii) dissemination of results towards users and the general public to feed an ecosystem vision of marshes exposed to marine submersions. Ultimately, and based on a revised definition of patrimonial identity adapted to marsh areas, PAMPAS will bring new solutions for sustainable management, by transmitting economic, cultural and ecological knowledge. The stakes and the project issues therefore go far beyond the local level and concern wetlands at the global level for which it is now necessary to review the analysis and management frameworks by integrating the heritage into its various social and ecosystem dimensions. https://www-iuem.univ-brest.fr/lemar/projets-scientifiques/pampas/?lang=en
Project
Mercury (Hg) is one of the metals of highest concern in the marine environment as its organic form (methylmercury - MeHg) bioaccumulates in marine biota and consistently biomagnifies along the food chain. Combined to its high toxicity, especially on nervous systems, Hg transfer in biota, including seafood resources, endangers humans and wildlife. Among marine organisms, most of the available information on Hg is related to top predators (mammals and birds) and fish, mainly because of their apex position conferring them high Hg concentrations and of their importance as a food source for humans, respectively. In contrast, information on Hg in cephalopod tissues is still scarce, despite the fact that these molluscs i) are known to accumulate efficiently chemical contaminants, ii) are a growing seafood resource of high economic interest, iii) have a pivotal place in trophic webs playing a key role in the Hg intake of top predators including Humans and iv) have a developed nervous system and cognitive performances that confer them high ecological advantages despite their extremely short lifespan (~2 years max). In addition, under business-as-usual anthropic emissions trajectory, cephalopods as other marine organisms will face major challenges with i) the mercury deposition into the oceans expected to increase over the forthcoming fifty years, ii) the ocean surface warming projected to rise by 2 to 4°C at the end of the century and iii) the surface ocean pCO2 expected to increase inducing a reduction of pH by 0.2–0.4 units over this century. By affecting the organism physiology, future ocean conditions would affect the Hg levels in biota impacting then the metal transfer along the food chain. In parallel, the toxicity of Hg, potentially worsened by ocean acidification and warming, is totally unknown in these invertebrates, although their outstanding complex physiology and behaviour. In this context, this project aims at defining the bioaccumulation processes of Hg (both inorganic Hg and MeHg) at (1) quantifying kinetic and transfer parameters under increasing CO2 conditions, and at (2) determining the impacts of these multiple stressors on molecular responses, physiological performances and behaviour on the cuttlefish model. MERCy will hinge on (i) the inputs from different disciplines (ecotoxicology, ecophysiology, genomic, neuroethology), and (ii) on associating proven (e.g. radioecology) and new state-of-the art technologies (e.g. next-generation sequencing, cognitive traits determination) to provide with an integrated and comprehensive understanding of the impact of Hg under climate change conditions on cephalopod. Expected results will improve the knowledge on the Hg concentrations in biota, on the putative change of Hg levels in seafood and related human health risk, on the fate of cephalopod in a changing ocean, on the combined impacts of a background ocean contamination with acidification and warming on vulnerable early-life stages. MERCy is funded by the "Fondation pour la Recherche sur la Biodiversité" and the "Ministère de la Transition Ecologique et Solidaire".