Marie Soressi

Marie Soressi
Leiden University | LEI · Faculty of Archaeology

Doctorat

About

129
Publications
66,892
Reads
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4,199
Citations
Additional affiliations
June 2013 - present
Leiden University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
January 2008 - June 2013
Institut national de recherches archéologiques préventives
Position
  • Ingénieur de Recherche
July 2004 - December 2007
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Position
  • Post-doctoal fellow

Publications

Publications (129)
Article
Full-text available
Modern humans replaced Neandertals ∼40,000 y ago. Close to the time of replacement, Neandertals show behaviors similar to those of the modern humans arriving into Europe, including the use of specialized bone tools, body ornaments, and small blades. It is highly debated whether these modern behaviors developed before or as a result of contact with...
Article
Full-text available
The last decade has seen a significant growth of our knowledge of the Neandertals, a population of Pleistocene hunter-gatherers who lived in (western) Eurasia between ∼400,000 and 40,000 y ago. Starting from a source population deep in the Middle Pleistocene, the hundreds of thousands of years of relative separation between African and Eurasian gro...
Article
The discovery of an almost complete Neanderthal skeleton in a Châtelperronian context at Saint-Césaire 35 years ago changed our perspective on the beginning of the Upper Paleolithic in western Europe. Since then, the Châtelperronian has generally been considered a "transitional" industry rather than an Upper or a Middle Paleolithic industry because...
Article
Full-text available
Several Mousterian sites in France have yielded large numbers of small black blocs. The usual interpretation is that these 'manganese oxides' were collected for their colouring properties and used in body decoration, potentially for symbolic expression. Neanderthals habitually used fire and if they needed black material for decoration, soot and cha...
Article
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In recent years, there has been a tendency to correlate the origin of modern culture and language with that of anatomically modern humans. Here we discuss this correlation in the light of results provided by our first hand analysis of ancient and recently discovered relevant archaeological and paleontological material from Africa and Europe. We foc...
Article
Full-text available
We are a group of archaeologists, anthropologists, curators and geneticists representing diverse global communities and 31 countries. All of us met in a virtual workshop dedicated to ethics in ancient DNA research held in November 2020. There was widespread agreement that globally applicable ethical guidelines are needed, but that recent recommenda...
Article
Full-text available
Several bone and antler points from Mesolithic Doggerland have been dated and analysed to determine the animal species from which they were made. The points were found on the beaches of the province of Zuid-Holland, but their primary depositional site lies off the coast in the North Sea. 14C-dates have given an estimated age of 8.000 to 11.000 year...
Article
Full-text available
Barbed bone points originally deposited in Doggerland are regularly collected from the shores of the Netherlands. Their typology and direct ¹⁴C dating suggest they are of Mesolithic age. However, the species of which the barbed points were made cannot be identified based on morphological criteria. The bones used to produce the barbed points have be...
Article
Genetic and climate-driven estimates of past population dynamics are increasingly influential in broader models of hominin migration and adaptation, yet the contribution of stone artifact variability remains more contentious. Scientists are increasingly recognizing the potential of unretouched stone flakes ('flakes') in exploring existing models of...
Article
Full-text available
Archaeological excavation is a demolishing process. Rather few elements outlast extractive operations. Therefore, it is hard to visualise the precise location of unearthed finds at a previously excavated research area. Here, we present a mixed reality environment that displays in situ 3D models of features that were formerly extracted and recorded...
Article
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Increasingly researchers have employed confocal microscopy and 3D surface texture analysis to assess bone surface modifications in an effort to understand ancient behavior. However, quantitative comparisons between the surfaces of purported archaeological bone tools and experimentally manufactured and used bones are complicated by taphonomic proces...
Article
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Five nearly identical fragments of specialized bone tools, interpreted as lissoirs (French for “smoothers”), have been found at two Middle Paleolithic sites in southwest France. The finds span three separate archaeological deposits, suggesting continuity in the behavior of late Neandertals. Using standard morphological assessments, we determined th...
Article
Full-text available
The transition from Middle to Upper Paleolithic is a major biological and cultural threshold in the construction of our common humanity. Technological and behavioral changes happened simultaneously to a major climatic cooling, which reached its acme with the Heinrich 4 event, forcing the human populations to develop new strategies for the exploitat...
Article
Full-text available
This study uses data extracted from 3D models to compare blade cores from the Châtelperronian and Protoaurignacian stone tool industries. These technocomplexes are at the center of the debate surrounding the interactions between Neanderthals and anatomically modern humans approximately 45 to 40,000 years ago. We created 3D models of lithic cores fr...
Article
Full-text available
Isotope and archeological analyses of Paleolithic food webs have suggested that Neandertal subsistence relied mainly on the consumption of large herbivores. This conclusion was primarily based on elevated nitrogen isotope ratios in Neandertal bone collagen and has been significantly debated. This discussion relies on the observation that similar hi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In 2013 we reported [1] the discovery that Neandertals produced a specialized bone tool previously thought to be restricted to Homo sapiens. We interpreted four nearly identical fragments of shaped and worn animal ribs as lissoirs, a French term meaning "smoothers". The bones come from two Middle Paleolithic sites in southwest France, Pech-de-l' Az...
Article
Full-text available
Fire use appears to have been relatively common among Neandertals in the Middle Palaeolithic. However, the means by which Neandertals procured their fire-either through the collection of natural fire, or by producing it themselves using tools-is still a matter of debate. We present here the first direct artefactual evidence for regular, systematic...
Data
Biface and pyrite fire making method
Article
Full-text available
The Protoaurignacian is considered a cultural proxy for one of the first expansions of anatomically modern humans across Europe. The stabilization of bladelet industries that characterizes this techno-complex is therefore often used as supporting evidence for the break from previous stone knapping traditions and also for the increase of human mobil...
Article
Full-text available
Although it has previously been shown that Neanderthals contributed DNA to modern humans, not much is known about the genetic diversity of Neanderthals or the relationship between late Neanderthal populations at the time at which their last interactions with early modern humans occurred and before they eventually disappeared. Our ability to retriev...
Article
Full-text available
The destructive distillation of birch bark to produce tar has recently featured in debates about the technological and cognitive abilities of Neandertals and modern humans. The abilities to precisely control fre temperatures and to manipulate adhesive properties are believed to require advanced mental traits. However, the signifcance given to adhes...
Article
Although a rich record of Pleistocene human-associated archaeological assemblages exists, the scarcity of hominin fossils often impedes the understanding of which hominins occupied a site. Using targeted enrichment of mitochondrial DNA we show that cave sediments represent a rich source of ancient mammalian DNA that often includes traces of hominin...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study uses data extracted from 3D models to compare the Châtelperronian and Protoaurignacian stone tool industries, which are at the center of the debate surrounding the nature and extent of interactions between Neanderthals and anatomically modern humans (AMHs) approximately 40,000 years ago. Our data are derived from 3D scans of blade cores...
Article
Full-text available
Peptide mass fingerprinting of bone collagen (ZooMS) has previously been proposed as a method to calculate the extent of the non-enzymatic degradation of glutamine into glutamic acid (deamidation). Temporal and spatial variation of glutamine deamidation at a single site, however, has not been investigated. Here we apply ZooMS screening of Châtelper...
Article
Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) measurements were made on individual, sand-sized grains of quartz from Middle Palaeolithic deposits at three sites (Pech de l'Azé I, II and IV) located close to one another in the Dordogne region of southwest France. We were able to calculate OSL ages for 69 samples collected from these three sites. These age...
Article
The finding of 175,000-year-old structures deep inside a cave in France suggests that Neanderthals ventured underground and were responsible for some of the earliest constructions made by hominins. See Letter p.111
Article
Full-text available
Three-dimensional (3D) artifact modeling is becoming an increasingly utilized tool in archaeology. In comparison with other methods of 3D scanning, photogrammetry has the benefits of being relatively inexpensive, mobile, and more adaptable for use in field conditions. As part of a larger project to document variability in lithic production systems...
Article
Full-text available
We report the application of a molecular barcode method (ZooMS) to identify fragmentary bone remains (>2.5 cm) from a Middle to Upper Palaeolithic sequence at Les Cottés, France. ZooMS uses peptide mass fingerprinting of collagen (the most abundant protein in bone) to discriminate fauna (typically to genus level). Using previously reported peptide...
Article
Full-text available
Résumé : Le site moustérien d’Angé est situé au centre de la France, région où le Paléolithique moyen reste mal connu. Il a livré un ensemble lithique attribué au Début Glaciaire weichselien (SIM5). L’étude technologique a démontré la présence d’un débitage laminaire qui le rapproche des ensembles du Nord de la France. Les outils retouchés évoquent...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The results obtained emphasize the need of de-tailed, regional-scale, paleoenvironmental analyses of faunal communities in order to discuss human -environ-ment interactions. Moreover, our integrated approach of large and small fauna communities allows estimating to what degree changes in subsistence strategies were in-fluenced by changes in prey av...
Article
Jelinek Arthur J. . Neandertal lithic industries at La Quina. xxv+420 pages, 221 b&w illustrations, 140 tables, CD. 2013. Tucson: University of Arizona Press; 978-0-8165-2246-0 hardback $75. - Volume 88 Issue 339 - Marie Soressi
Chapter
Full-text available
Le Châtelperronien est l’un des technocomplexes marquant le passage du Paléolithique moyen au Paléolithique supérieur, du nord de l’Espagne au Centre-Est de la France. Ce n’est certes pas le seul faciès de cette dite “transition” du Paléolithique moyen au Paléolithique supérieur en Europe (autres contributions dans ce volume), mais il est depuis qu...
Article
Full-text available
Through the first exhaustive and detailed analysis of personal ornaments recovered at Les Cottés cave, this contribution proposes new elements for the debate on the cultural dynamics that impacted the symbolic organization of the first Upper Palaeolithic communities in Western Europe. The complete archaeosequence identified at Les Cottés during rec...
Article
Full-text available
Through the first exhaustive and detailed analysis of personal ornaments recovered at Les Cottés cave, this contribution proposes new elements for the debate on the cultural dynamics that impacted the symbolic organization of the first Upper Palaeolithic communities in Western Europe. The complete archaeosequence identified at Les Cottés during rec...
Article
Full-text available
Modern humans replaced Neandertals ∼ 40,000 y ago. Close to the time of replacement, Neandertals show behaviors similar to those of the modern humans arriving into Europe, including the use of specialized bone tools, body ornaments, and small blades. It is highly debated whether these modern behaviors developed before or as a result of contact with...
Data
The crystal-chemical properties of clay minerals are closely dependent on the physicochemical conditions prevailing at the time when they formed in soils and weathered zones. The degree of alteration of primary minerals and the composition of the secondary products are clearly linked to climate and plant cover. In particular, changes are rapid unde...
Chapter
Full-text available
Les Cottés was discovered at the end of the nineteenth century and was popularized by L. Pradel during the fifties and the sixties. This site is known for its well preserved Aurignacian industries and for “Les Cottés point”, type fossil of the “evolved” Châtelperronian (Pradel, 1963). In 2006, we started a new excavation program which already shed...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper presents an experimental protocol that aims to distinguish and define motpho- technologically laminar productions and Levallois laminar productions documented South West of France. The experimental results and the comparison with archaeological series have allowed the characterization of both productions and the formalization of the diff...
Article
Non-enzymatic deamidation accumulates in aging tissues in vivo and has been proposed to be potentially useful as a molecular clock. The process continues post mortem, and here we explore the increase in levels of deamidation in archaeological collagen, as measured during Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry (ZooMS) analysis. With the high sensitivit...
Article
Rapport de diagnostic archéologique édité par l'INRAP Centre-Ile-de-France, DRAC Centre, Orléans en 2009. 86 p.- 1 pl. h.- t.
Article
Rapport de diagnostic archéologique édité par l'INRAP Centre-Ile-de-France, DRAC Centre, Orléans en 2009. 40 p.
Article
Full-text available
The Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition is the key period for our understanding of Neanderthal and modern human interactions in Europe. The site of Les Cottés in south-west France is one of the rare sites with a complete and well defined sequence covering this transition period. We undertook an extensive radiocarbon dating program on mammal bon...
Article
Full-text available
L'industrie lithique du Moustérien de type Quina de Chez-Pinaud à Jonzac, en Charente-Maritime, est originale. Elle est fondée sur la production de supports bifaciaux par percussion marginale alors que le Moustérien de type Quina est connu pour son débitage de supports courts et épais par percussion interne. Par ailleurs, cette industrie est ici as...
Article
Full-text available
L’industrie lithique du Mousterien de type Quina de Chez-Pinaud a Jonzac, en Charente-Maritime, est originale. Elle est fondee sur la production de supports bifaciaux par percussion marginale alors que le Mousterien de type Quina est connu pour son debitage de supports courts et epais par percussion interne. Par ailleurs, cette industrie est ici as...
Article
The Chatelperronian from la Roche-à-Pierrot in Saint-Césaire is characterized by its strong “Mousterian component”. It was discovered in a layer named Ejop, which had originally been sub-divided in two parts (Ejop SUP and Ejop INF). Up to now, the industry coming from these two sub-layers had been analyzed together without discriminating lithics di...
Chapter
Full-text available
Varias “boules de caliza” han sido descubiertas durante las excavaciones recientes de los niveles Musterienses de tipo Quina del yacimiento de Chez-Pinaud en Jonzac. Algunas de estas piezas llevan huellas de percusión en zonas más prominentes. No obstante, este tipo de objeto, identificado hasta ahora en las antiguas excavaciones, ha sido frecuente...