Marie-Pierre St-Onge

Marie-Pierre St-Onge
Columbia University | CU · Department of Medicine

Ph.D

About

223
Publications
34,066
Reads
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10,538
Citations
Introduction
The overall focus of my research is the study of the impact of lifestyle, specifically sleep and diet, on cardio-metabolic risk factors. I conduct innovative, cutting-edge clinical research combining my expertise on sleep, nutrition, and energy balance regulation to address questions relating to the role of circadian rhythms, including sleep duration and timing as well as meal timing and eating patterns, on cardio-metabolic risk. I have strong expertise in the conduct of controlled inpatient and outpatient studies of sleep and dietary manipulations. I am currently the Center Director for the American Heart Association funded Go Red for Women Strategically Focused Research Center, aimed at determining the causality of the relation between sleep and CVD risk in women.
Additional affiliations
March 2018 - present
Columbia University
Position
  • Managing Director
Description
  • Sleep center of excellence. Mission: To unite sleep clinicians and researchers and provide a platform for interactions that will foster new avenues and collaborations for research, clinical care, and education.
July 2016 - present
Columbia University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
January 2007 - February 2016
Columbia University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Description
  • Course Director for Clinical Nutrition and Course Co-Director for Obesity MSc.-level courses
Education
September 1999 - August 2002
McGill University
Field of study
  • Nutrition
January 1998 - June 1999
McGill University
Field of study
  • Nutrition
September 1994 - December 1997
McGill University
Field of study
  • Nutrition

Publications

Publications (223)
Article
Background: Eating behavior is an important construct with predictive value for energy intake and is associated with health. Two characteristics of eating behavior, eating window and eating frequency, are consistently associated with cardiometabolic risk across populations and have been shown to be related to sleep patterns. Both lifestyle factors...
Article
Introduction: Short sleep duration is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Dyslipidemia is one of the main risk factors for CVD but the influence of sleep duration on this risk factor is, for the moment, inconclusive. Objective: The goal of this study is to test the impact of mild sleep restriction (SR), sustained for...
Article
Introduction: The Covid-19 pandemic had a negative impact on mental health and lifestyle behaviors, including dietary habits. Negative psychological factors are known to adversely impact lifestyle behaviors, but the influence of positive psychological well-being on dietary intakes is relatively unknown. Hypothesis: We assessed the hypothesis that p...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Circadian misalignment (CM), the mismatch between timing of behaviors and internal body clock, increases cardiometabolic risk, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. Population studies in night shift workers and intervention studies attempting to replicate CM have often been confounded by differences in energy intake, sleep durati...
Article
Insufficient sleep is highly prevalent in society and has tremendous negative health consequences. Despite the available treatments, there is continued demand for novel and natural strategies to promote better sleep. Dietary modifications could be a viable new target to improve sleep. A literature review using PubMed was conducted on studies that e...
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Full-text available
Aging is a risk factor for several pathologies, restricting one’s health span, and promoting chronic diseases (e.g., cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases), as well as cancer. Telomeres are regions of repetitive DNA located at chromosomal ends. Telomere length has been inversely associated with chronological age and has been considered, for...
Article
Objectives This brief narrative review aims to give an up-to-date overview of intuitive and mindful eating (I/ME) interventions with specific focus on cardiometabolic risk factors, including glucose, lipid profile, blood pressure and inflammatory markers. Content I/ME intervention studies in adults which measured at least one physiological paramet...
Article
Daytime sleepiness is common in older adults and may result from poor nighttime sleep due to sleep disordered breathing, fragmented sleep, or other sleep disorders. Daytime sleepiness may signify disruption of circadian rhythms and disorder in neural circuitry arising from neurodegenerative disease. We investigated the association between self‐repo...
Article
Background Sleep variability and social jetlag are associated with adverse cardiometabolic outcomes via circadian disruption. Variable eating patterns also lead to circadian disruption, but associations with cardiometabolic health are unknown. Methods and Results Women (n=115, mean age: 33±12 years) completed a 1‐week food record using the Automat...
Article
Two factors intrinsic to health are diet and sleep. These two behaviors may well influence one another. Indeed, that insufficient sleep adversely impacts dietary intakes is well documented. On the other hand, diet may influence sleep via melatonin and its biosynthesis from tryptophan. Experimental data exist indicating that provision of specific fo...
Article
Energy metabolism and appetite regulating hormones follow circadian rhythms which, when disrupted, could lead to adverse metabolic consequences. Such circadian misalignment, a mismatch between endogenous circadian rhythms and behavior, is most severely experienced by shift workers, due to nighttime wake, daytime sleep, and eating at night. However,...
Article
The human circadian system consists of the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus as well as in peripheral molecular clocks located in organs throughout the body. This system plays a major role in the temporal organization of biological and physiological processes, such as body temperature, blood pressure, hormone secretion,...
Article
Background: Sleeping less than 7 h per night is a risk factor for positive energy balance and weight gain. While the effect of short sleep on energy intake has been extensively studied, its influence on physical activity (PA), a key determinant of energy expenditure, is not well characterized. To date, no study has evaluated sedentary and PA patter...
Article
Introduction: Insufficient sleep is widely prevalent among US adults and is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D). Experimental studies show adverse effects of acute, severe short sleep on insulin sensitivity, but it is unclear whether these reflect risks associated with milder short sleep routinely observed in the general population. To date, no...
Article
Introduction: Variability in sleep patterns is an emerging risk factor for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Poor diet likely contributes to these relations, given the intricate link between sleep and diet, both of which are important determinants of cardiometabolic health. However, associations of irregular sleep with energy intake and...
Article
Introduction Poor sleep health is a key determinant of obesity risk, largely explained by overconsumption of energy. Eating behavior characteristics are predictive of energy intake and weight change and may link sleep with risk factors for obesity. However, the relationships between sleep and dimensions of eating behavior, and potential individual...
Article
Introduction Sleep loss has a range of detrimental effects on cognitive ability. However, few studies have examined the impact of sleep restriction on neuropsychological function using an experimental design. The goal of this study was to examine the extent to which maintained insufficient sleep affects cognition in healthy adults compared to habit...
Article
The global obesity epidemic is well established, with increases in obesity prevalence for most countries since the 1980s. Obesity contributes directly to incident cardiovascular risk factors, including dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and sleep disorders. Obesity also leads to the development of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular...
Article
Sleep curtailment and circadian misalignment disrupt energy-sensing and eating behaviors, which can contribute to weight gain and obesity-related comorbidities. Herein, we review the effects of experimental manipulations of sleep duration and circadian alignment on circulating concentrations of appetite hormones, specifically leptin and ghrelin. Fu...
Article
Background An innate preference for later timing of sleep and activity, termed evening chronotype, is linked to poorer cardiovascular health (CVH). However, associations of chronotype with specific health behaviors in US women are not well characterized. Of particular interest is habitual diet, because <1% of US adults meet recommendations for a he...
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Poor sleep is a determinant of obesity; with overconsumption of energy contributing to this relationship. Eating behavior characteristics are predictive of energy intake and weight change and may underlie observed associations of sleep with weight status and obesity risk factors. However; relationships between sleep and dimensions of eating behavio...
Article
The Go Red for Women movement was initiated by the American Heart Association (AHA) in the early 2000s to raise awareness concerning cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in women. In 2016, the AHA funded 5 research centers across the United States to advance our knowledge of the risks and presentation of CVD that are specific to women. This report hig...
Article
Circadian misalignment induced by disruptions in sleep/wake cycle or feeding/fasting cycle has been linked with both metabolic health, including energy homeostasis and insulin sensitivity(Reference Morris, Yang and Garcia1) and alterations in gut microbiome(Reference Qin, Li and Cai2). This study aimed to examine the potential associations among sl...
Article
Introduction: Misalignment of lifestyle behaviors with circadian rhythms is related to hypertension (HTN) risk in experimental studies. Estimation of the circadian rhythm of 24 h rest-activity patterns, which serves as a measure of circadian rhythmicity in a free-living population setting, has been linked to health outcomes but its association with...
Article
Introduction: Over one-third of US adults do not achieve adequate sleep duration of 7 or more h per night. Short sleep is linked to higher odds of cardiometabolic diseases, including obesity. However, whether prolonged insufficient sleep causes increased body weight or adiposity remains unclear. Objective: To compare, in women, changes in body weig...
Article
Introduction: Social jet lag, typically defined as the difference in sleep timing on work vs. free days, is related to elevated cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, via circadian disruption. Irregular meal timing may also lead to circadian disruption, but the role of social jet lag in eating patterns in CVD risk has not been examined. Hypothesis: Soc...
Article
Full-text available
Nightly fasting duration (NFD) and eating timing and frequency may influence cardiometabolic health via their impact on circadian rhythms, which are entrained by food intake, but observational studies are limited. This 1-year prospective study of 116 US women (33 ± 12y, 45% Hispanic) investigated associations of habitual NFD and eating timing and f...
Article
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Consumption of a Mediterranean diet has been linked to better sleep health in older, European populations. However, whether this dietary pattern is predictive of sleep quality in US women, a group prone to poor sleep, is unknown. This prospective cohort study of 432 US women (20-76 y; 60% racial/ethnic minority) evaluated whether compliance with a...
Article
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Variability in daily sleep patterns is an emerging factor linked to metabolic syndrome. However, whether reducing bedtime variability improves markers of disease risk has not been tested. Here, we assessed whether body composition and inflammation were impacted by changes in bedtime variability over a 6-week period, during which, women were instruc...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose of review: Night-to-night variability in sleep patterns leads to circadian disruption and, consequently, could increase cardiometabolic risk. The purpose of this review is to summarize findings from studies published between 2015 and 2020 examining various measures of night-to-night variability in sleep in relation to metabolic syndrome (M...
Article
Nut consumers have lower body weight and are at lower cardiovascular disease risk than non-consumers. Interestingly, minority adults, who have the highest prevalence of obesity and are at disproportionate risk of cardiovascular disease, have low nut intakes. The goal of this study was to test whether consumption of almonds, compared to low-fat/high...
Article
Introduction We examined nationally-representative data on macronutrients associated with multiple dimensions of sleep health. Methods Data were obtained from the 2015–2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, (N=5,266 adults). Standard 24-h dietary recall procedures were analyzed to establish daily consumption of protein, carbohydrat...
Article
Introduction Previous studies have shown that, in the laboratory, sleep deprivation leads to unhealthy eating patterns. In real-world samples, lack of sleep is associated with obesity. Few real-world studies of sleep and food intake patterns exist, especially from nationally-representative samples. Methods Data from the 2015–2016 National Health a...
Article
Variability in daily sleep duration and unstable bedtimes are emerging sleep-related factors that have been linked to metabolic syndrome. For example, in longitudinal studies, the odds of developing metabolic syndrome over 6.3 y median follow-up are 1.36 for every 1 h increase in sleep onset variability (standard deviation of bedtimes measured over...
Article
Background: Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) including preeclampsia and gestational hypertension are pregnancy complications which have been shown to increase women’s risk for development of CVD later in life. Pregnant women are predisposed to sleep disturbances which may contribute to risk of HDP; however, whether HDP are associated with...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The AHA Life’s Simple 7 (LS7) is a measure of cardiovascular health (CVH). Sufficient and healthy sleep has been linked to higher LS7 scores and lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, but sleep has not been included as a CVH metric. Hypothesis: A CVH score that includes the LS7 plus sleep metrics would be more strongly associated with...
Article
Background: An individual’s chronotype, the innate preference for the timing of behaviors such as eating and sleeping, has been linked to various health outcomes. Indeed, we recently demonstrated that evening chronotype was related to poorer cardiovascular health (CVH) in US women. However, the associations of chronotype with specific health behavi...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose of review: In this review, we summarize recent epidemiological data (2014-2019) that examine the association of sleep variability with blood pressure (BP), discuss potential underlying mechanisms, and highlight future research directions. Recent findings: Higher standard deviations of sleep duration and sleep-onset timing were not relate...
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Dairy has been described as everything from a superfood to a poison; yet, arguments, assumptions, and data justifying these labels are not always clear. We used an issue-based information system, “dialogue mapping™,” to summarize scientific points of a live panel discussion on the putative effects of dairy on cardiovascular diseases (CVD) from a da...
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Full-text available
Background Poor sleep increases cardiovascular disease risk, and diet likely contributes to this relationship. However, there are limited epidemiological data on the relationship between measures of sleep quality and habitual dietary patterns. This study examined these associations in a diverse sample of women. Methods and Results Baseline data fr...
Article
Background: Studies assessing the impact of sleep restriction (SR) on blood pressure (BP) are limited by short study length, extreme SR (<4 hours a night), and lack of attention to psychological distress as a possible mediator. Methods: A community-based cohort was assembled with 237 women (age 34.1 ± 13.5 years; body mass index 25.4 ± 5.4 kg/m2...
Chapter
Inadequate sleep, in terms of both duration and quality, is highly prevalent in today's society, leading to growing interest in factors that can impact sleep. Epidemiological studies suggest a bidirectional relation between sleep and overall dietary patterns, whereby diets rich in fiber, whole grains, and fruits and vegetables are associated with l...
Article
Background: Previous studies have shown mixed results on the association between carbohydrate intake and insomnia. However, any influence that refined carbohydrates have on risk of insomnia is likely commensurate with their relative contribution to the overall diet, so studies are needed that measure overall dietary glycemic index (GI), glycemic l...
Article
Healthy sleep is associated with lower body weight and could improve and sustain weight loss following bariatric surgery. To support this premise, preliminary data on the relation between sleep duration and quality and long‐term weight change in a subsample of participants from the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery are presented. Results...
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A reciprocal relationship between obesity and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) likely exists, wherein obesity contributes to OSA, and OSA-related sleep disturbances promote weight gain. It remains unclear whether continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) affects body composition. We conducted an open-label, parallel-arm, non-randomized, matched befor...
Article
Objective: Low testosterone in men increases the risk for various disorders. Severe sleep restriction (SR) may reduce testosterone, but the effects of long-term short sleep are unknown. This study tested the effects of SR on circulating testosterone in healthy young men. Design: Randomized controlled studies of SR vs habitual sleep (HS) in inpat...
Article
Study objectives: To investigate the correlation between self-reported and objective measures of total sleep time (TST) in adults and examine whether sex, race/ethnicity, and weight status influence this association. Methods: Participants were individuals who screened for sleep intervention studies, providing > 7 days of wrist actigraphy sleep d...
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Full-text available
Background: Studies associate sleeping and eating late in the day with poor dietary quality and higher obesity risk but differences in sleep duration confound this association. We aimed to determine whether sleep and meal timing, independent of sleep duration, influenced food intake in healthy adults. Methods: This was a controlled, 2 × 2 inpati...
Article
Background and objective: Sleep is an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that is not currently included as a cardiovascular health (CVH) metric in the American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7 (AHA LS7). Our objective was to evaluate the association of sleep with CVH in women and examine differences by menopausal status and r...
Article
Introduction Low testosterone concentrations in men increases the risk for physical, psychological, and cognitive disorders. Despite sleep being the period when the majority of testosterone production occurs, there is little information on how sleep influences testosterone concentrations. The primary goal of the present study was to examine the eff...
Article
Introduction Diabetes and obesity are growing healthcare concerns throughout the world. Current strategies have not proven effective to stem the epidemic. Individuals with short sleep duration are at increased risk for obesity, while evidence is incomplete as to how sleep affects all aspects of energy expenditure (EE). Brown adipose tissue (BAT, br...
Article
Introduction Short sleep duration promotes metabolic dysregulation and obesity. We have previously shown that acute sleep restriction increases neuronal activity in response to food stimuli in areas of interoception and reward, such as the insula and orbitofrontal cortex. However, whether chronic mild sleep restriction impacts food reward valuation...
Article
Introduction Previous studies have shown a relation between sleep duration/quality and dietary intakes, but relatively few have examined characteristics of habitual diet associated with sleep, using validated measures. The present study examined relationships between overall diet quality and a range of sleep-related factors. Methods Data were take...
Article
Introduction: Poor sleep patterns are ubiquitous and may play a role in cardiovascular disease etiology through their influence on health behaviors and factors included in the American Heart Association Life’s Simple 7 (AHA LS7). Associations of objectively measured sleep phenotypes with meeting cardiovascular health (CVH) metrics have not been pre...
Article
Epidemiological studies show that nut consumers have lower body weight than non-consumers. Individuals who consume more tree nuts have lower odds of obesity and metabolic syndrome than those who are low tree nut consumers. In clinical intervention studies, nut consumption has been shown to lower abdominal adiposity and improving weight loss relativ...
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Full-text available
Purpose of Review This review investigates the potential bi-directional relation between sleep and diet in considering their contribution to cardiovascular health. We further explore the involvement of the gut microbiome in the relationships between poor sleep and dietary intakes and increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Recent Findings The...
Chapter
Short sleep duration is of growing public health concern due to increasing evidence that it leads to weight gain and obesity. Much of the evidence presented in this chapter lends support to the hypothesis that short sleep duration increases food intake via both homeostatic and hedonic mechanisms. But bi-directionality in the relation between sleep...
Article
Rationale While short sleep duration has been linked to unhealthy dietary patterns, little is known about the association of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a disorder characterized by sleep fragmentation, and diet. Objective Investigate associations between diet quality and OSA in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and assess whether reduct...
Article
Full-text available
Sleep duration and sleep quality are important predictors of risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). One potential link between sleep health and CVD is through lifestyle factors such as diet. To clarify the association between diet and sleep, we assessed the associations of sleep duration and insomnia symptoms with current Mediterranean-style diet (...
Article
Full-text available
Sleep duration has become increasingly recognized as an important influencer of health. Epidemiologic and observational studies have shown associations between short sleep duration and increased risk for chronic cardiometabolic disorders, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. These associations have led to investigations i...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Insufficient sleep increases blood pressure. However, the effects of milder, highly prevalent but frequently neglected sleep disturbances, including poor sleep quality and insomnia, on vascular health in women are unclear. We investigated whether poor sleep patterns are associated with blood pressure and endothelial inflammation in a d...
Article
Full-text available
Background and objective: For a high level athlete, it is essential to ensure optimal energy as well as macro-and micro-nutrient and fluid intakes, in order to improve their performance during training and competition. Protein intake should be 1.2–2.1 g/kg/d, whereas the requirements for carbohydrate and fat intakes should be >5g/kg/d and 20–35% of...
Article
Introduction: Animal studies and limited human research suggest that nightly fasting duration (NFD) and timing of food intake may influence cardiometabolic risk through behavioral and physiological mechanisms. Research is needed to clarify these associations in diverse populations including Hispanic/Latina women, who have elevated cardiometabolic r...
Article
Introduction: The prevalence of obesity continues to rise since 1980. This obesity epidemic has been paralleled by a trend of reduced sleep duration and sleep quality throughout the years. However, there is limited research on the relation between sleep duration and quality and its association with weight loss maintenance. The purpose of this study...
Article
Introduction: Epidemiological studies often utilize self-reports to characterize total sleep time (TST). Studies provide discordant information on the association between self-reported and objective TST with some finding weak or no correlations and bias in reporting based on sex and body mass index. Objective: Our goal was to investigate the correl...