Marie Louise Stig Sorensen

Marie Louise Stig Sorensen
University of Cambridge | Cam · Division of Archaeology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

87
Publications
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Introduction
Marie Louise Stig Sorensen worked at the Department of Archaeology, University of Cambridge from 1987 to 2021. She is now retired but will continue as Director of Research until 2024. Marie Louise does research in Prehistoric Archaeology (Bronze Age Europe), gender archaeology and Heritage Studies. She is involved in fieldwork in Cape Verde and Hungary, and directs a project on the history and heritage of the Yangshao culture.

Publications

Publications (87)
Article
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The COVID-19 lockdown of society in 2020 deprived people of access to many heritage sites. This made the public uniquely aware of why they visited heritage sites and what they valued about the visits, once heritage sites reopened. In particular, regaining access framed visits in terms of personal agency and wellbeing. Notions of capability, social...
Article
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The article, which is a biography of the Swedish archaeologist Mats P. Malmer, tries to identify some of the characteristics of Scandinavian archaeology. In particular, Malmer's discussion ofthe concept oftypology is of great importance for this tradition. Another intention ofthe article is to supplement the historiographic discussions in Swedish a...
Article
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The active and discursive nature of material culture is the subject of this paper. It will, however, be approached from the point of view of typology and in particular the debate about the 'Swedish Typology’ (Gräslund 1974). Typology is probably the archaeological method or theory through which the discipline has most explicitly stated its view on...
Article
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Responding to recent advances in knowledge about the first arrival of woollen sheep in Europe and linked investigations of textile remains on the Continent, this paper argues that our insight into the role of wool in the English Bronze Age needs rethinking. We argue that the relevant questions are: when did the procurement of and working with wool...
Cover Page
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Flyer for the volume African Heritage Challenges
Chapter
Since independence, the elusive goal of ‘development’ has been central to the agenda of African nations. This chapter is critical of persistent ‘crisis’ narratives; nonetheless, it recognizes that many parts of Africa face complex challenges. It argues that three aspects are crucial for understanding the ways in which the role and potentials for he...
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Abstract This chapter discusses the classic heritage tensions and challenges that are linked to the proposed reconstruction of the Bamiyan Buddha statues. Arguing that the most fundamental question is not how but why they should be reconstructed, the reasoning formulated around three core aspects are considered. The frst is about authenticity. Clas...
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This chapter discusses the classic heritage tensions and challenges that are linked to the proposed reconstruction of the Bamiyan Buddha statues. Arguing that the most fundamental question is not how but why they should be reconstructed, the reasoning formulated around three core aspects are considered. The first is about authenticity. Classical ex...
Book
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The richness of Africa’s heritage at times stands in stark contrast to the economic, health, political and societal challenges faced. Development is essential but in what forms? For whom? Following whose agendas? At what costs? This book explores how heritage can promote, secure, or undermine sustainable development with special focus on sub-Sahara...
Chapter
The construction of memorials is a well-established cultural practice, widely recognised and expected. We hear about them; how they are planned, designed, debated, altered, and sometimes removed. They are celebrated, inaugurated, and critiqued; and they become the focal point for anniversaries and forms of memorialisation through which accounts of...
Chapter
The bronze sculpture known as the Isted Lion is an interesting example of a memorial site of continuously changing meaning. Not only its meaning but also its physical location has changed over time—as it has been moved between towns and countries. Each move has been part of a process of politically motivated reinterpretations not just of the war, w...
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The Textile Revolution in Bronze Age Europe - edited by Serena Sabatini November 2019
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FROM THE TRENCH – PERSONALISING A NETTING-NEEDLE FROM THE BRONZE AGE TELL AT SZÁZHALOMBATTA-FÖLDVÁR, HUNGARY by Magdolna Vicze (Matrica Museum, Százhalombatta, vicze@matricamuzeum.hu), Marie Louise Stig Sørensen (Cambridge, mlss@cam.ac.uk) and Joanna Sofaer (Southampton, R.Sofaer-Derevenski@soton.ac.uk) A small piece reflecting on one object. Can...
Book
Creativity is an integral part of human history, yet most studies focus on the modern era, leaving unresolved questions about the formative role that creativity has played in the past. This book explores the fundamental nature of creativity in the European Bronze Age. Considering developments in crafts that we take for granted today, such as potter...
Chapter
This essay discusses the making of objects out of bronze during the Bronze Age. Bronze objects are essentially made in two ways: hammering or casting. As a method of production, hammering works with the existing material to shape it by stretching it. Casting is different, however, and the innovation that the development of casting represents is the...
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What, then, are the innate properties of the material when we consider bronze and what influence did they have on human creative engagement? As bronze is now a common material it is easy to take its existence for granted, or alternatively, to assume a technological evolution from copper to bronze that posits the emergence of this alloy as a ‘natura...
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This section considers how metal objects were made: how they were designed, formed, and shaped. The chaîne opératoire for metallurgy can be presented somewhat simply in terms of the main stages of ore processing, preparation of the raw material, melting, casting and/ or hammering, and final preparation. Alternatively, it may be broken into the many...
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Razors are a very interesting group of objects within the Nordic Bronze Age, both in terms of their apparent social roles as they are closely associated with males and due to the development of their shape and decoration through time. The latter is the main focus here. Our aim is to use the changes in the decoration of razors to investigate creativ...
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After the Portuguese discovered the Cape Verde Islands in AD 1456 they divided its main island, Santiago, into two governing captaincies. The founding settlement in the south-west, Cidade Velha, soon became the Islands’ capital and a thriving trade centre; in contrast, that in the east, Alcatrazes, only lasted as an official seat from 1484–1516 and...
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It has become increasingly clear that cultural heritage is an important agent in the interfacing between culture generally and the specificities of politics. This has particular significant repercussions regarding the roles that heritage plays in armed conflict. Analyses of this intersection have therefore become an important field within heritage...
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This chapter investigates the construction of the battlefield of Dybbøl, Denmark, as a memorial site with particular changes of connotations and cultural and political meanings over time. Dybbøl is the site of a decisive battle in the Schleswig-Holstein war of 1864, won by Prussia and used by Bismarck to initiate his campaign of creating Greater Ge...
Book
The reconstruction of society after conflict is complex and multifaceted. This book investigates this theme as it relates to cultural heritage through a number of case studies relating to European wars since 1864. The case studies show in detail how buildings, landscapes, and monuments become important agents in postconflict reconstruction, as well...
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With a strong emphasis on data, the two volumes of this book demonstrate that mobility was essential to the European Bronze Age by exploring the shared cultural expression of Bronze Age societies in contrast to their simultaneous development of new local and regional characteristics. During this seminal époque, cultural and social formations of an...
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Introduction General Political Background and Historiographies of Gender The “Second Wave” in Scandinavian Prehistoric Archaeology Between the Waves: The Development of Gender Archaeology in Scandinavia The “Third Wave”: Postprocessual and Alternative Approaches Final Reflections Notes References
Poster
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Over 1300 Late Bronze Age (Period IV-VI) razors have been found across Denmark. Placing elaborate decoration on asymmetrically-shaped razors would have been a design challenge. Using data from Baudou (1960) and Kaul (1998) our analysis aimed to extract the design principles developed by Late Bronze Age craftspeople.
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DNA from living human populations can be used to infer their evolutionary and demographic histories, especially regarding initial dispersal events and subsequent population expansions. Southern Scandinavia was re-colonised by Late Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers beginning around 14 700 years BP, and the recent literature offers two competing hypothes...
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This chapter concerns what is arguably one of the first European-built Christian churches in the Tropics, the N.a S.a da Conceição, in Ribeira Grande (now known as Cidade Velha), the former capital of the Cape Verde Islands. It briefly covers the early history of the town and then proceeds to consider its earliest church. The evidence of historical...
Book
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The body is the main forum for learning about how to do, think and believe and it is a starting point for the granting and forming of many forms of meaning. Fourteen papers explore the relationship between knowledge and the body through a series of historical and archaeological case studies. More specifically, it considers the concept of embodied k...
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Early depictions of Cidade Velha's sear-frontage show a thriving, well-appointed and heavily fortified town with architectural aspirations: ships ride at anchor, the cathedral and Bishop's Palace can be seen below the plateau-top fort on the east side of the valley, the harbour is ringed with batteries, behind which poke a number of two-storey resi...
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This paper considers three different ways that heritage can be considered fragile—as a reference to the conservation status of the physical heritage, as a concern for the meaning of the heritage, and in terms of threats to the knowledge potentials. It also briefly considers any special conditions that may characterise the threats to heritage in Afr...
Book
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This volume grew out of an interdisciplinary discussion held in the context of the Leverhulme-funded project 'Changing Beliefs in the Human Body', through which the image of the body in pieces soon emerged as a potent site of attitudes about the body and associated practices in many periods. Archaeologists routinely encounter parts of human and ani...
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Sørensen, M. L. S., and K. Rebay. 2008. Interpreting the body: Burial practices at the Middle Bronze Age cemetery at Pitten. Archaeologia Austriaca 89 (2005): 153-175.
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Gender archaeology has by now become a relatively well-established research topic within archaeology. Recent years have seen the publication of a number of edited volumes, a rapidly expanding number of papers, and even a few journals and newsletters dedicated to this subject. It is, therefore, very surprising that in this literature the historiogra...
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At the Round Table discussion in Zadar different understandings of what the phrase ‘a European archaeology/an archaeology of Europe’ stands for were brought to the table, so to speak. Several nuances may be discerned, and within these there were differences that could lead to substantially different claims. The proposition may thus refer to the que...
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Ruth Tringham is a Professor of Anthropology at the University of California at Berkeley. She is one of the founders and a director of the UC Berkeley Multimedia Authoring Center for Teaching in Anthropology (MACTiA). Her research has focused on the transformation of early agricultural (Neolithic) societies. Tringham has directed and published arch...
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Middle Bronze Age Hungary provides an opportunity to investigate prehistoric `landscapes of the body', as perceptions and attitudes to the body affect burial practices and other body practices, including the wearing of dress and the use of pottery. This article explores the cultural diversity expressed by the roughly contemporary and neighbouring g...
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Archaeology of Gender: What Does it Mean?Why Gender Archaeology?Archaeological Gender ResearchGender Identifying ApproachGender Inclusive ApproachGender and MaterialityConclusion
Article
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Zusammenfassung Dieser Beitrag über den Wandel der Bestattungspraxis in der späteren europäischen Urgeschichte widmet sich Fra-gen, Herangehensweisen und Methodik eines Forschungsprojektes zur Bronzezeit. Im Rahmen des Projektes "Der Wandel menschlicher Körperkonzepte – eine vergleichende Sozialstudie" untersuchen fünf parallele Fallstudien an der...
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Sørensen, M. L. S., and K. Rebay. 2007. "Changing Social Practices of Death in Later European Prehistory," in R. Karl and J. Leskovar (eds) Interpretierte Eisenzeiten, Studien zur Kulturgeschichte von Oberösterreich 19. 119-123. Linz: Oberösterreichisches Landesmuseum.
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Allison's paper shows how the complex world of real-life social relations, dependencies and needs may be extracted from the small finds and the mundane domestic aspects of life associated with a site - even when that site is a Roman fort. In her approach Allison does not presume that society in its totality is mirrored in these finds; rather her ap...
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What is the fate of the material from old excavations? This article aims to generate attention towards this question by discussing the fragmentation of assemblages due to long and disjointed excavation campaigns as well as the eagerness of museums to have representative objects from famous sites. The challenge emerging is the need to explore ways o...
Article
1. Excavating women: towards an engendered history of archaeology, Margarita Diaz-Andreu and Marie Louise Stig Sorensen, SECTION I. GENERAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE HISTORY OF WOMEN IN EUROPEAN ARCHAEOLOGY, 2. Rescue and recovery: on historiographies of female archeologists, Marie Louise Stig Sorensen, 3. Archaeology of French women and French women in...
Book
The cover picture. The Kungsåra bench 1. Excavating women: towards an engendered history of archaeology - Margarita Díaz-Andreu and Marie Louise Stig Sørensen. SECTION I. GENERAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE HISTORY OF WOMEN IN EUROPEAN ARCHAEOLOGY 2. Rescue and recovery: on historiographies of female archeologists. - Marie Louise Stig Sørensen. 3. Archae...
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This paper proposes that social identities can be studied through the cultural construction of appearance, since this is a powerful visual mediation of identities and is a component in the learning of social roles. Three analytical principles about the construction of appearances are outlined and applied to different case studies. This illustrates...
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The theoretical recognition of the role of gender in forming society is still separated from its practical realization in archaeology. This is partly due to lack of self-reflection within gender archaeology, as exemplified by the problematic distinction commonly drawn between sex and gender. Despite this, gender studies are relevant to archaeology;...