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Marie-France Duhamel

Marie-France Duhamel

Doctor of Philosophy

About

11
Publications
981
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7
Citations
Introduction
PhD Linguistics, Australian National University. Former member of the Wellsprings of Linguistic Diversity project at the Australian National University, Canberra (2015-2020). Variationist study of the Oceanic language of Raga, north Pentecost, north Vanuatu (completed in 2020). Current project (2020-2021): Extending the documentation of Pa'umotu dialects (French Polynesia).
Additional affiliations
February 2018 - May 2018
Australian National University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Responsibilities included preparing and delivering lectures and tutoring a class combining undergraduates and postgraduates in Languages of Asia and the Pacific.
January 2012 - December 2015
University of Auckland
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Assisted Professor Meyerhoff with two linguistic research projects. Tasks included: - Coding transcribed files for the Nkep corpus (Vanuatu language), analysing lexical terms and building a Nkep word list. - Collating, quantifying and analysing data for publication of article co-authored with Professor Meyerhoff on the perceived different varieties of New Zealand English.
March 2011 - June 2014
University of Auckland
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Assisted with lectures, tutorials, and essay-marking of sociolinguistic and academic writing classes at the University of Auckland. In 2013, I assisted with the preparation of lecture material in sociolinguistics and delivered most lectures to a 250-strong class of undergraduates.
Education
January 2015 - November 2019
Australian National University
Field of study
  • Linguistics
January 2010 - January 2011
University of Auckland
Field of study
  • Linguistics

Publications

Publications (11)
Thesis
Full-text available
If we are to understand global linguistic diversity, we must first understand the mechanisms which engender and maintain it. This is what the Wellsprings of Linguistic Diversity project (Australian National University, 2014-2019) aims to examine by studying variation in small communities of the Australasia-Pacific region. Within the framework of th...
Article
Full-text available
This article discusses the two terms that convey the concept of taboo in Raga, the language of north‐central Vanuatu originally spoken in north Pentecost, and provides linguistic evidence expanding on the information published previously by the anthropologists Masanori Yoshioka and John Patrick Taylor. Based on the corpus collected in north Penteco...
Article
This paper reports on variation among speakers of Raga, an Oceanic language of Pentecost island, Vanuatu, in their use of borrowings from Bislama, the national language of Vanuatu, an English-lexifier contact language. The study measures the frequency of borrowings from Bislama in the speech of 50 speakers, surveys speakers’ strategies in assimilat...
Article
Full-text available
This article reports on the investigation of possessive constructions as they are used in a corpus of spontaneous speech collected in 2015-2017 from speakers of Raga, the Oceanic vernacular of north Pentecost, in Vanuatu. The article reveals that one specialised classifier has fallen out of use but that Raga speakers show no intergenerational varia...
Article
Full-text available
New Zealand has traditionally prided itself on an ethos of casual egalitarianism – a value system with positive and negative implications. The well-known linguistic homogeneity of the islands and general lack of regional dialect differences (Trudgill, Peter. 2004. New-dialect formation: The inevitability of colonial Englishes. Edinburgh: Edinburgh...
Presentation
Paper presented in December 2020 at the Australian Linguistic Conference, as part of the workshop 'Social categories across diverse speech communities', chaired by Catherine Travis (ANU) and James Walker (La Trobe). Recording of the presentation can be accessed here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/qi5l69zjgzn4zg6/Duhamel_Contextualising our analysis of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Paper for the Proceedings of the 11th Conference On Oceanic Languages (COOL 11, Nouméa, October 2019). This paper is in French. Article pour publication des Actes de la 11ème Conférence de Linguistique Océanienne.
Data
The largest languages of Vanuatu (>6,000 speakers), their approximate coverage and number of speakers, as per Lynch and Crowley (2001). This map was created by Marie-France Duhamel and drawn by cartographer Tim Duhamel in 2019. This map appears in page 9 of the thesis : Duhamel, Marie-France (2020). Variation in Raga - A quantitative and qualitativ...
Presentation
Full-text available
An annotated presentation outlining the outcomes of my study on variation in Raga, Vanuatu. Presentation given at the Wellsprings of Linguistic Diversity forum at the Australian National University on 28 June 2019.
Thesis
Full-text available
This thesis presents a description of the Noun Phrase in the language spoken on Atchin Island in Central Vanuatu. The indigenous language of Atchin islanders belongs to the Oceanic subgroup of the Austronesian language family. Atchin is thought to be a dialect of the Northeast Malakula language which is estimated to have a population of 9,000 speak...
Data
Atchin Island, north-east Malakula, Vanuatu. The islet of Atchin is divided into five areas where the members of the five different clans (potvanu) live: Ruar, Melep, Melmarur, Melparav and Senar. Map created by Marie-France Duhamel in 2010 from a drawing by nasup-a-mwilep (chief) Gaston Atuary, of Ruar potvanu.

Network

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The aim of this project is to add to the documentation of endangered and little-documented Tuamotuan dialects, known as reo Pa’umotu. New material will be collected in the archipelago, transcribed and translated. Recently digitised material collected in the 1980s in four of the nine dialects will also be transcribed and translated. This project also contributes to the inception of a Pa’umotu-French bilingual dictionary, in collaboration with Kāruru vānaga (Pa’umotu Academy). All collected and transcribed material will be deposited in local digital archives and PARADISEC.
Archived project
In the archipelago of Vanuatu, renowned for its extreme cultural and linguistic diversity, the Raga language is an atypical case since it offers linguistic conservatism and uniformity. The goal of this project is to explain Raga's linguistic uniformity, by examining lexical, phonological and syntactical variables, from a quantitative and qualitative perspective.
Project
The Wellsprings of Linguistic Diversity is a five year Laureate project awarded by the Australian Research Council to Professor Nicholas Evans within the School of Culture, History and Language in the College of Asia and the Pacific, at the Australian National University. The project seeks to address fundamental questions of linguistic diversity and disparity through an analysis of linguistic variation and change. The project will address a crucial missing step in existing linguistic research by addressing the question of what drives linguistic diversification so much faster in some societies than in others. It will do this by undertaking intensive, matched case studies of speech communities across Australia and the Pacific, allowing researchers to detect variations in languages as they occur and compare the amounts and types of variation found in different sorts of settings, with a particular focus on small-scale multilingual speech communities. It aims to generate an integrated model of language variation and change, building in interactions between social and linguistic processes. The research findings will offer insights into the enormous diversity of human experience, vital for fields as diverse as cognitive science, human evolutionary biology, anthropology and archaeology.