Marie Engemann

Marie Engemann
Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf | HHU · Department of English and American Studies

M.A.

About

11
Publications
195
Reads
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8
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2017 - present
Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Winter 2018/19: "Word-Formation in English" ☻ Summer 2018: "Introduction to English Language and Linguistics - Part II" and "Phonetics" ☻ Winter 2017/18: "Introduction to English Language and Linguistics - Part I"
October 2015 - March 2017
Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
Position
  • Tutor
Description
  • Tutor for the Introduction to Medieval English Studies and Historical Linguistics, and for Academic Writing and Research
Education
September 2014 - January 2017
July 2013 - November 2013
The University of Queensland
Field of study
  • Linguistics, Australian Studies
September 2011 - June 2014
Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
Field of study
  • English, Linguistics

Publications

Publications (11)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that phonologically identical morphological entities in English show systematic differences in their phonetic realization. For example, word-final /s/ is longest in non-morphemic contexts, shorter with suffixes, and shortest in clitics (e.g. Plag et al. 2017, Schmitz et al. 2021) and the stems of morphologically complex wo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In language comprehension research there is a debate whether (or if so, how) subsegmental information may influence lexical access (e.g. Cho et al. 2007, Christophe et al. 2004, Goldinger 1996). Recent evidence from studies investigating the phonetic realization of complex words suggest that this debate needs to be extended to the role of subphonem...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that phonologically identical morphological entities in English show systematic differences in their phonetic realization. For example, stems of morphologically complex words are longer than stems of mono-morphemic words (Engemann & Plag, 2021; Seyfarth et al., 2017), and word-final /s/ is longest as a non-morphemic segmen...
Poster
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that phonologically identical morphological entities in English show systematic differences in their phonetic realization. For example, word-final /s/ is longest in non-morphemic contexts, shorter with suffixes, and shortest in clitics (Plag et al., 2017; Schmitz et al., 2020), while stems of morphologically complex words...
Article
Recent work on the acoustic properties of complex words has found that morphological information may influence the phonetic properties of words, e.g. acoustic duration. Paradigm uniformity has been proposed as one mechanism that may cause such effects. In a recent experimental study Seyfarth et al. (2017) found that the stems of English inflected w...
Thesis
In my master's thesis I performed a perception experiment in which participants listened to homophone sentences such as "The roof's/roofs collapsed" and were then asked to evaluate whether "roof" is singular or plural. I did not find any significant results for a duration of the word-final s. Rather, participants tended to decide on singular or plu...

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Projects

Project (1)