Marie Camerota

Marie Camerota
Brown University · Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior

PhD

About

31
Publications
2,169
Reads
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401
Citations
Introduction
I am a T32 postdoctoral fellow in Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University. My research centers around prenatal influences on children's cognitive development. Additionally, I investigate the role of epigenetics linking pre- and perinatal risk factors to infant behavior and neurodevelopment.
Additional affiliations
August 2014 - present
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Position
  • Research Assistant
May 2014 - present
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 2013 - May 2018
August 2009 - May 2013
Cornell University
Field of study
  • Human Development

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Little research has considered whether prenatal experience contributes to executive function (EF) development above and beyond postnatal experience. This study tests direct, mediated, and moderated associations between prenatal risk factors and preschool EF and IQ in a longitudinal sample of 1,292 children from the Family Life Project. A composite...
Article
The current study tests whether accuracy and reaction time (RT) on the Hearts and Flowers (HF) task, a common assessment tool used across wide age ranges, can be leveraged as joint indicators of child executive function (EF) ability. Although previous studies have tended to use accuracy or RT, either alone or as separate indicators, one open questi...
Article
Previous meta-analyses have identified moderate deficits in executive function (EF) in children born low birth weight (birth weight < 2500 g; LBW). The current study tests the joint contribution of LBW and parenting quality on trajectories of executive function in 1121 preschoolers (50 % boys). We estimated latent growth curve models to represent l...
Article
Full-text available
The "fetal origins" hypothesis suggests that fetal conditions not only affect birth characteristics such as birth weight and gestational age, but also have lifelong health implications. Despite widespread interest in this hypothesis, few methodological advances have been proposed to improve the measurement and modeling of fetal conditions. A Statis...
Article
This study tests the factor structure, measurement invariance, and correlates of the Childhood Executive Functioning Inventory (CHEXI) with a large and diverse sample of 3- to 5-year-olds (n = 844). Consistent with previous studies, a two-factor model that distinguishes working memory from inhibition provides the best fit to the observed data. This...
Article
Importance: The ability to identify poor outcomes and treatable risk factors among very preterm infants remains challenging; improving early risk detection and intervention targets to potentially address developmental and behavioral delays is needed. Objective: To determine associations between neonatal neurobehavior using the Neonatal Intensive...
Article
Inflammation during pregnancy is beginning to be understood as a risk factor predicting poor infant health and neurodevelopmental outcomes. The long-term sequelae associated with exposure to prenatal inflammation are less well established. The current study examined associations between maternal inflammation during pregnancy, markers of infant neur...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Infants born extremely premature are at increased risk for health complications later in life for which neonatal inflammation may be a contributing biological driver. Placental CpG methylation provides mechanistic information regarding the relationship between prenatal epigenetic programming, prematurity, neonatal inflammation, and lat...
Article
The study examines the association between infant sleep, physiological, and emotional reactivity at 3 and 6 months of age in 89 African American infants and their caregivers. Infant sleep was objectively measured at 3 and 6months using actigraphy for 7 days and nights. At 6 months of age, dyads participated in the Still-Face Paradigm (SFP) (Tronick...
Article
Infants born <30 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) are at increased risk for neurodevelopmental impairment by age 2. Prior studies report rates of impairment for individual outcomes separately. Our objective was to describe neurodevelopmental profiles of children born <30 weeks PMA, using cognitive, language, motor, and behavioral characteristics. We s...
Article
Full-text available
Background Prenatal risk factors are related to poor health and developmental outcomes for infants, potentially via epigenetic mechanisms. We tested associations between person-centered prenatal risk profiles, cumulative prenatal risk models, and epigenome-wide DNA methylation (DNAm) in very preterm neonates. Methods We studied 542 infants from a...
Article
Objective To determine whether pharmacological treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is associated with changes in DNA methylation (DNAm) of the mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) and improvements in neonatal neurobehavior. Study design Buccal swabs were collected from 37 neonates before and after morphine treatment for NAS. Genomic DNA wa...
Article
Full-text available
Objective To examine caregiving predictors of maternal reported sleep problems and child behavioral and cognitive outcomes in early childhood. Design A prospective longitudinal study from 6 to 84 months of age. Setting Lab visits, assessments, and questionnaires conducted with a community-based sample. Participants One hundred sixty-four African...
Article
Full-text available
Epigenetic clocks based on DNA methylation (DNAm) can accurately predict chronological age and are thought to capture biological aging. A variety of epigenetic clocks have been developed for different tissue types and age ranges, but none have focused on postnatal age prediction for preterm infants. Epigenetic estimators of biological age might be...
Preprint
Objective: To determine whether pharmacological treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is associated with changes in DNA methylation (DNAm) of the mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) and improvements in neonatal neurobehavior.Study Design: Buccal swabs were collected from 37 neonates before and after morphine treatment for NAS. Genomic DNA wa...
Preprint
Full-text available
Epigenetic clocks based on DNA methylation (DNAm) can to accurately predict chronological age and are thought to capture biological aging. A variety of epigenetic clocks have been developed for different tissue types and age ranges, but none has focused on age prediction for preterm infants. Epigenetic estimators of biological age might be especial...
Preprint
Background: Infants born <30 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) are at increased risk for neurodevelopmental impairment by age 2. Prior studies report rates of impairment for individual outcomes separately. Our objective was to describe neurodevelopmental profiles of children born <30 weeks PMA, using cognitive, language, motor, and behavioral character...
Preprint
Objective: Inflammation during pregnancy is beginning to be understood as a risk factor predicting poor infant health and neurodevelopmental outcomes. The long-term sequelae associated with exposure to prenatal inflammation are less well established. The current study tests the associations between maternal inflammation during pregnancy, markers of...
Article
Modern developmental science is informed by several shared principles and adopts a lifespan approach that goes from infancy to senescence. Increasingly, disciplines outside psychology are adopting research frameworks (e.g., fetal origins, developmental origins of health and disease, first 1000 days) that prioritize prenatal experience as a driver o...
Article
Despite widespread interest in the construct of executive functioning (EF), we currently lack definitive evidence regarding the best measurement model for representing the construct in substantive analyses. The most common practice is to represent EF ability as a reflective latent variable, with child performance on individual EF tasks as observed...
Article
Traditionally, executive function (EF) tasks have been scored using either accuracy or reaction time (RT) metrics. The current study, which includes 1,015 first-grade children from the Family Life Project, demonstrates a new scoring approach for the Hearts and Flowers (HF) task that uses both item-level accuracy and RT data to estimate latent EF ab...
Article
Parents in the United States increasingly report bed-sharing with their infants (i.e., sleeping on a shared sleep surface), but the relationship between bed-sharing and child socioemotional outcomes are not well understood. The current study examines the links between mother-infant bed-sharing at 3 months and infant affect and behavior during a dya...
Article
The current study examined the moderating role of infant sleep in the link between maternal factors (i.e., maternal education, depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance) and infant cognition. Data come from 95 African American parent–child dyads. At 3 months of age, infant sleep was objectively measured using videosomnography and actigraphy, from whic...
Article
Full-text available
The development of executive function (EF) in early childhood contributes to social and academic aspects of school readiness and facilitates emerging self-regulatory competence. Numerous efforts are underway to identify aspects of early brain development that contribute to emerging EF. Existing research supports the importance of multiple white mat...
Article
Sleep patterns change dramatically across the earliest years of life and play an important role in children’s daytime functioning. As a result, psychological research has taken an increasing interest in unpacking the many intrinsic (i.e., child characteristics) and extrinsic (i.e., environmental input) factors that influence children’s sleep develo...
Article
Objectives: The current study examined the relationship between neighborhood deprivation and infant sleep at 3 months of age. Methods: Neighborhood and sleep data were collected from 80 African American infants and their caregivers. A composite neighborhood deprivation score was created using census data. Infant sleep was measured via 7 nights o...
Article
The current study compares sleep variables obtained from videosomnography, actigraphy, and sleep diaries, three of the most common sleep assessment methods used in infant sleep studies. Using a sample of 90 African American 3-month olds, we compare correlations and discrepancies for seven sleep variables across each of the three pairs of assessment...
Article
This study examined the independent and mediated associations between maternal depression symptoms (MDS), mother-child interaction, and child executive function (EF) in a prospective longitudinal sample of 1,037 children (50% boys) from predominantly low-income and rural communities. When children were 6, 15 and 24 months of age, mothers reported t...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives The current study is the first to assess pregnant women's perceptions of e-cigarettes and the prevalence of e-cigarette use during pregnancy, using a national sample of pregnant women (N = 445) recruited online. Methods An online survey was used to assess the prevalence and perceptions of e-cigarette use among pregnant women, including p...
Article
This study examined the direct and interactive effects of infants’ respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and maternal depressive symptoms (MDS) during the first 6 months of life in the prediction of children's sleep problems at age 18 months. Participants included 156 children and their mothers who were followed from 3 to 18 months of age. At ages 3 a...

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