Marianne Gunderson

Marianne Gunderson
University of Bergen | UiB · Department of Linguistic, Literary and Aesthetic studies

About

11
Publications
3,635
Reads
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14
Citations
Citations since 2017
11 Research Items
14 Citations
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Introduction
PhD candidate at the University of Bergen with the ERC project Machine Vision in Everyday Life, led by prof. Jill Walker Rettberg. Into digital culture, feminist and posthuman theory, and monsters. Currently researching imaginings of machine vision in science fiction and digital vernacular genres.

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Margrit Shildrick has argued that the monster’s ability to disturb and unsettle arises from its position as simultaneously same and different, both self and other at the same time. Through an analysis of Algernon Blackwood’s novella The Willows, this article discusses the challenge posed by the nonhuman Absolute other, the nebulous creatures whose...
Article
Full-text available
Fan studies is a multifaceted discipline that developed from widely different fields of research, resulting in a great variety of methodological approaches. A recurring issue in discussions on methodology in fan studies is the tension between the researchers' attachment to the phenomenon they are studying and the more detached, critical role of a r...
Article
Full-text available
What does it feel like to be watched by a machine? How do we make sense of our present state of concurrent awareness of and obliviousness of living our everyday lives under ubiquitous surveillance? This presentation will explore these questions through an analysis of a selection of creepypasta stories that draw their horror from the experience of b...
Presentation
Creepypasta is a genre of digital horror written within online communities in the tradition of folklore or urban legends, and many of them feature machine vision or surveillance technologies such as CCTV cameras, facial recognition, or nanny cams. Combining horror tropes with the idea of digital surveillance, these stories function as affective art...
Thesis
Full-text available
This thesis examines the reinterpretation of sex and gender in omegaverse fanfiction. In omegaverse fanfiction, characters from popular culture are written into a parallel gender structure, as alphas, betas, or omegas. Using concepts from fan studies and feminist theory, this thesis analyzes three omegaverse fanfiction stories, asking how they inte...
Article
Full-text available
This data paper documents a dataset that captures cultural attitudes towards machine vision technologies as they are expressed in art, games and narratives. The dataset includes records of 500 creative works (including 77 digital games, 190 digital artworks and 233 movies, novels and other narratives) that use or represent machine vision technologi...
Preprint
This data paper documents a dataset that captures cultural attitudes towards machine vision technologies as they are expressed in art, games and narratives. The dataset includes records of 500 creative works (including 77 digital games, 190 digital artworks and 233 movies, novels and other narratives) that use or represent machine vision technologi...
Data
This dataset captures cultural attitudes towards machine vision technologies as they are expressed in art, games and narratives. The dataset includes records of 500 creative works (including 77 digital games, 191 digital artworks and 236 movies, novels and other narratives) that use or represent machine vision technologies like facial recognition,...
Article
Full-text available
Utvidet virkelighet, der digitale objekter blir lagt oppå og kombinert med den ordinære synsflaten, er en teknologi under stadig utvikling, som lenge har vært en del av våre digitale fremtidsforestillinger. I denne artikkelen undersøker jeg hvordan ideer om blikk og makt kodes inn i tre populærkulturelle fremtidsvisjoner om utvidet virkelighet. Gje...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Machine vision technologies are increasingly ubiquitous in society and have become part of everyday life. However, the rapid adoption has led to ethical concerns relating to privacy, agency, bias and accuracy. This paper presents the methodology and preliminary results from a digital humanities project that maps and categorises references to and us...
Preprint
Full-text available
Machine vision technologies are increasingly ubiquitous in society and have become part of everyday life. However, the rapid adoption has led to ethical concerns relating to privacy, bias and accuracy. This paper presents the methodology and some preliminary results from a digital humanities project that is mapping and categorising references to an...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
This five year, ERC-funded project (2018-2023), led by Professor Jill Walker Rettberg, explores how new algorithmic images are affecting us as a society and as individuals. The Machine Vision team will study theories and histories of visual technologies and current machine vision, analyse digital art, computer games and narrative fictions that use machine vision as theme or interface, and examine the experiences of users and developers of consumer-grade machine vision apps. Three main research questions are woven through all the approaches, addressing 1) new kinds of agency and subjectivity; 2) visual data as malleable; 3) values and biases. This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No 771800).