Mariana F Wolfner

Mariana F Wolfner
Cornell University | CU · Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics

PhD

About

366
Publications
34,364
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21,424
Citations
Citations since 2017
81 Research Items
7449 Citations
201720182019202020212022202302004006008001,0001,2001,400
201720182019202020212022202302004006008001,0001,2001,400
201720182019202020212022202302004006008001,0001,2001,400
201720182019202020212022202302004006008001,0001,2001,400

Publications

Publications (366)
Article
Full-text available
The model organism Drosophila melanogaster has become a focal system for investigations of rapidly evolving genital morphology as well as the development and functions of insect reproductive structures. To follow up on a previous paper outlining unifying terminology for the structures of the male terminalia in this species, we offer here a detailed...
Preprint
Sex Peptide, a seminal fluid protein of D. melanogaster males, has been described as driving a virgin-to-mated switch in females, through eliciting an array of responses, including increased egg laying, activity and food intake and a decreased re-mating rate. While it is known that Sex Peptide achieves this, at least in part, by altering neuronal s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Male-derived seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) enter and induce a myriad of physiological and behavioral changes in mated female flies optimizing fertility. Many post-mating changes in female Drosophila melanogaster persist for ∼10-14 days, because the seminal protein that induces them, Sex Peptide (SP), is retained long-term in females by b...
Article
Full-text available
Significance In species with internal fertilization, sperm spend an important part of their lives within the female. To examine the life history of the sperm during this time, we used semiquantitative proteomics and sex-specific isotopic labeling in fruit flies to determine the extent of molecular continuity between male and female reproductive tra...
Article
For more than 100 years, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been one of the most studied model organisms. Here, we present a single-cell atlas of the adult fly, Tabula Drosophilae , that includes 580,000 nuclei from 15 individually dissected sexed tissues as well as the entire head and body, annotated to >250 distinct cell types. We provide...
Preprint
Full-text available
The model organism Drosophila melanogaster has become a focal system for investigations of rapidly evolving genital morphology as well as the development and functions of insect reproductive structures. To follow up on a previous paper outlining unifying terminology for the structures of the male terminalia in this species, we offer here a detailed...
Preprint
In polyandrous internally fertilizing species, a multiply-mated female can use stored sperm from different males in a biased manner to fertilize her eggs. The females ability to assess sperm quality and compatibility is essential for her reproductive success, and represents an important aspect of postcopulatory sexual selection. In Drosophila melan...
Preprint
The model organism Drosophila melanogaster has become a focal system for investigations of rapidly evolving genital morphology as well as the development and functions of insect reproductive structures. To follow up on a previous paper outlining unifying terminology for the structures of the male terminalia in this species, we offer here a detailed...
Preprint
Full-text available
The model organism Drosophila melanogaster has become a focal system for investigations of rapidly evolving genital morphology as well as the development and functions of insect reproductive structures. To follow up on a previous paper outlining unifying terminology for the structures of the male terminalia in this species, we offer here a detailed...
Article
Full-text available
Background Mating induces behavioral and physiological changes in the arbovirus vector Aedes aegypti , including stimulation of egg development and oviposition, increased survival, and reluctance to re-mate with subsequent males. Transferred seminal fluid proteins and peptides derived from the male accessory glands induce these changes, though the...
Article
Full-text available
Background Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are globally distributed vectors of viruses that impact the health of hundreds of millions of people annually. Mating and blood feeding represent fundamental aspects of mosquito life history that carry important implications for vectorial capacity and for control strategies. Females transmit pathogens to vertebra...
Article
Full-text available
The neprilysin (M13) family of metalloendopeptidases comprises highly conserved ectoenzymes that cleave and thereby inactivate many physiologically relevant peptides in the extracellular space. Impaired neprilysin activity is associated with numerous human diseases. Here, we present a comprehensive list and classification of M13 family members in D...
Article
The biogenic monoamine octopamine (OA) is a crucial regulator of invertebrate physiology and behavior. Since its discovery in the 1950s in octopus salivary glands, OA has been implicated in many biological processes among diverse invertebrate lineages. It can act as a neurotransmitter, neuromodulator and neurohormone in a variety of biological cont...
Article
Full-text available
Significance In many species, mating induces physiological changes in the female that increase the reproductive success of the mating pair. The postmating response (PMR) is caused by male seminal fluid proteins interacting with the female reproductive system. Because of the importance of the PMR in many insect species relevant to human health and a...
Article
Significance Understanding the mechanisms of development and disease often requires the ability to remove gene function from specific tissues. The CRISPR/Cas9 system can mutate any gene by Cas9-mediated DNA cutting, but current tissue-specific CRISPR/Cas9 tools still have much room for improvement. Here, we report a set of tools that significantly...
Article
Full-text available
X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) is a powerful tool for mapping and quantifying the spatial distribution of elemental composition of biological samples. Recently, it was reported that transition metal fluctuations occur during Drosophila reproduction, analogous to what is seen in mammals and nematodes, and may contribute to Drosophila female fer...
Article
Full-text available
Mosaic animals have provided the platform for many fundamental discoveries in developmental biology, cell biology, and other fields. Techniques to produce mosaic animals by mitotic recombination have been extensively developed in Drosophila melanogaster but are less common for other laboratory organisms. Here, we report m osaic a nalysis by g RNA-...
Article
Significance We describe a role for the seminal fluid protein Sex Peptide (SP) in regulating the post-mating morphology and physiology of the female digestive tract. We show that females must receive SP to increase their midgut size following mating, a response that is important for female fecundity. Receiving SP is also important for post-mating c...
Article
Full-text available
Postcopulatory sexual selection (PCSS), comprised of sperm competition and cryptic female choice, has emerged as a widespread evolutionary force among polyandrous animals. There is abundant evidence that PCSS can shape the evolution of sperm. However, sperm are not the whole story: they are accompanied by seminal fluid substances that play many rol...
Article
Synopsis Like many scientific disciplines, the field of reproductive biology is subject to biases in terminology and research foci. For example, females are often described as coy and passive players in reproductive behaviors and are termed “promiscuous” if they engage in extra-pair copulations. Males on the other hand are viewed as actively holdin...
Article
Full-text available
Drosophila melanogaster females undergo a variety of post-mating changes that influence their activity, feeding behavior, metabolism, egg production and gene expression. These changes are induced either by mating itself or by sperm or seminal fluid proteins. In addition, studies have shown that axenic females—those lacking a microbiome—have altered...
Article
Full-text available
In many animal species, females undergo physiological and behavioral changes after mating. Some of these changes are driven by male-derived seminal fluid proteins, and are critical for fertilization success. Unfortunately, our understanding of the molecular interplay between female and male reproductive proteins remains inadequate. Here we analyze...
Article
Full-text available
Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are the primary vectors of numerous viruses that impact human health. As manipulation of reproduction has been proposed to suppress mosquito populations, elucidation of biological processes that enable males and females to successfully reproduce is necessary. One essential process is female sperm storage in specialized stru...
Article
The transition from a developmentally arrested mature oocyte to a developing embryo requires a series of highly conserved events, collectively known as egg activation. All of these events are preceded by a ubiquitous rise of intracellular calcium, which results from influx of external calcium and/or calcium release from internal storage. In Drosoph...
Article
Full-text available
When females mate with more than one male, the males’ paternity share is affected by biases in sperm use. These competitive interactions occur while female and male molecules and cells work interdependently to optimize fertility, including modifying the female’s physiology through interactions with male seminal fluid proteins (SFPs). Some modificat...
Article
Full-text available
When females mate with more than one male, the males’ paternity share is affected by biases in sperm use. These competitive interactions occur while female and male molecules and cells work interdependently to optimize fertility, including modifying the female’s physiology through interactions with male seminal fluid proteins (SFPs). Some modificat...
Article
Full-text available
Neuronal networks are the standard heuristic model today for describing brain activity associated with animal behavior. Recent studies have revealed an extensive role for a completely distinct layer of networked activities in the brain—the gene regulatory network (GRN)—that orchestrates expression levels of hundreds to thousands of genes in a behav...
Preprint
Full-text available
CRISPR/Cas9 has emerged as a powerful technology for tissue-specific mutagenesis. However, tissue-specific CRISPR/Cas9 tools currently available in Drosophila remain deficient in three significant ways. First, many existing gRNAs are inefficient, such that further improvements of gRNA expression constructs are needed for more efficient and predicta...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Reduced fertility with advancing age is well known in females but understudied in males. Most previous work on male reproductive aging has focused on age-related effects on sperm. However, nonsperm seminal fluid is also vital for fertility but might age differently. Using fruit flies, we find that seminal fluid and sperm are both quali...
Article
Full-text available
When females mate with more than one male, the males' paternity share is affected by biases in sperm use. These competitive interactions occur while female and male molecules and cells work interdependently to optimize fertility, including modifying the female’s physiology through interactions with male seminal fluid proteins (SFPs). Some modificat...
Preprint
Full-text available
Mosaic animals have provided the platform for many fundamental discoveries in developmental biology, cell biology, and other fields. Techniques to produce mosaic animals by mitotic recombination have been extensively developed in Drosophila melanogaster but are less common for other laboratory organisms. Here, we report mosaic analysis by gRNA-indu...
Article
Full-text available
Temporal fluctuations in zinc concentration are essential signals, including during oogenesis and early embryogenesis. In mammals, zinc accumulation and release are required for oocyte maturation and egg activation, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that zinc flux occurs in Drosophila oocytes and activated eggs, and that zinc is required for femal...
Preprint
Full-text available
Drosophila melanogaster females undergo a variety of post-mating changes that influence their activity, feeding behavior, metabolism, egg production and gene expression. These changes are induced either by mating itself or by sperm or seminal fluid proteins. In addition, studies have shown that axenic females (those lacking a microbiome) have alter...
Preprint
Full-text available
In many animal species, females undergo physiological and behavioral changes after mating. Some of these changes are driven by male-derived seminal fluid proteins, and are critical for fertilization success. Unfortunately, our understanding of the molecular interplay between female and male reproductive proteins remains superficial. Here we analyze...
Article
Gene-poor, repeat-rich regions of the genome are poorly understood and have been understudied due to technical challenges and the misconception that they are degenerating "junk". Yet multiple lines of evidence indicate these regions may be an important source of variation that could drive adaptation and species divergence, particularly through regu...
Preprint
Full-text available
In populations in which females tend to mate with more than one male, sperm-sperm competition and cryptic female choice can occur, triggering biases in sperm use and influencing males' paternity share outcome of the mating. This competition occurs in the context of molecules and cells of male and female also working interdependently towards the com...
Preprint
Full-text available
Gene-poor, repeat-rich regions of the genome are poorly understood and have been understudied due to technical challenges and the misconception that they are degenerating "junk". Yet multiple lines of evidence indicate these regions may be an important source of variation that could drive adaptation and species divergence, particularly through regu...
Article
Behaviors associated with reproduction are major contributors to the evolutionary success of organisms and are subject to many evolutionary forces, including natural and sexual selection, and sexual conflict. Successful reproduction involves a range of behaviors, from finding an appropriate mate, courting, and copulation, to the successful producti...
Article
Full-text available
Egg activation is the essential process in which mature oocytes gain the competency to proceed into embryonic development. Many events of egg activation are conserved, including an initial rise of intracellular calcium. In some species, such as echinoderms and mammals, changes in the actin cytoskeleton occur around the time of fertilization and egg...
Article
Full-text available
Mammalian sperm must spend a minimum period of time within a female reproductive tract to achieve the capacity to fertilize oocytes. This phenomenon, termed sperm ‘capacitation’, was discovered nearly seven decades ago and opened a window into the complexities of sperm–female interaction. Capacitation is most commonly used to refer to a specific co...
Article
Significance A rise in intracellular free calcium is a conserved feature of the egg-to-embryo transition in almost all animals. In Drosophila , as in vertebrates, the rise starts at one end of the oocyte and then travels across the egg in a wave. The Drosophila calcium rise is mediated by an influx of calcium due to the action of mechanically gated...
Preprint
Egg activation is the process in which mature oocytes are released from developmental arrest and gain competency for embryonic development. In Drosophila and other arthropods, eggs are activated by mechanical pressure in the female reproductive tract, whereas in most other species, eggs are activated by fertilization. Despite the difference in the...
Article
There is extensive variation in males for sperm competitive abilities, and in females for the ability to distinguish among sperm from different males. But it is still not known how females distinguish males... In many species, sperm can remain viable in the reproductive tract of a female well beyond the typical interval to remating. This creates an...
Preprint
Full-text available
Declining ejaculate performance with male age is taxonomically widespread and has broad ramifications for fertility and fitness. However, we have a poor understanding of age-related changes to specific ejaculate components, how they cause reduced performance, and whether the decline is ameliorable. Here, we show that, in Drosophila , sperm producti...
Article
The moment of the fertilization of an egg by a spermatozoon—the point of “sperm success”- is a key milestone in the biology of sexually reproducing species and is a fundamental requirement for offspring production. Fertilization also represents the culmination of a suite of sexually selected processes in both sexes and is commonly used as a landmar...
Article
We propose that insights from the field of evolutionary developmental biology (or 'evo-devo') provide a framework for an integrated understanding of the origins of behavioural diversity and its underlying mechanisms. Towards that goal, in this Commentary, we frame key questions in behavioural evolution in terms of molecular, cellular and network-le...
Article
Aedes aegypti mosquitoes transmit pathogens such as yellow fever, dengue, Zika, and chikungunya viruses to millions of human hosts annually [1]. As such, understanding Ae. aegypti courtship and mating biology could prove crucial to the success of disease control efforts that target reproduction. Potentially to communicate reproductive fitness [2,3]...
Preprint
In many species, sperm can remain viable in the reproductive tract of a female well beyond the typical interval to remating. This creates an opportunity for sperm from different males to compete for oocyte fertilization inside the female’s reproductive tract. In Drosophila melanogaster , sperm morphology and seminal fluid content affect male succes...
Article
Full-text available
The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti,, transmits several viruses causative of serious diseases, including dengue, Zika, and chikungunya. Some proposed efforts to control this vector involve manipulating reproduction to suppress wild populations or to replace them with disease-resistant mosquitoes. The design of such strategies requires an intim...
Article
Full-text available
In almost all animals studied to date, the crucial process of egg activation, by which an arrested mature oocyte transitions into an actively developing embryo, initiates with an increase in Ca2+ in the oocyte's cytoplasm. This Ca2+ rise sets off a series of downstream events, including the completion of meiosis and the dynamic remodeling of the oo...
Article
Full-text available
Chemicals released into the environment by food, predators and conspecifics play critical roles in Drosophila reproduction. Females and males live in an environment full of smells, whose molecules communicate to them the availability of food, potential mates, competitors or predators. Volatile chemicals derived from fruit, yeast growing on the frui...
Article
Full-text available
Seminal fluid proteins elicit several post-mating physiological changes in mated Drosophila melanogaster females. Some of these changes persist for over a week after mating because the seminal protein that causes these changes, the Sex Peptide (SP), binds to sperm that are stored in the female reproductive tract. SP's sperm binding is mediated by a...
Preprint
Full-text available
The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, transmits several viruses, including dengue, Zika, and chikungunya. Some proposed efforts to control this vector involve manipulating reproduction to suppress wild populations or replacing them with disease-resistant mosquitoes. The design of such strategies requires an intimate knowledge of reproductive pr...
Article
Full-text available
Egg activation is essential for the successful transition from a mature oocyte to a developmentally competent egg. It consists of a series of events including the resumption and completion of meiosis, initiation of translation of some maternal mRNAs and destruction of others, and changes to the vitelline envelope. This major change of cell state is...
Article
Full-text available
Author summary In many animals, the male seminal fluid induces physiology changes in the mated female that increase a male’s reproductive success. These changes are often referred to as the post-mating response (PMR). In Drosophila, the seminal fluid proteins responsible for generating the PMR are made in a specialized gland, analogous to the mamma...
Data
A lncRNA is plays a role in the development of the accessory gland DIC images. Accessory gland phenotypes associated with BX-C mutations using Nomarski microsocpy. Each panel shows the accessory gland from a male hemizygous for a BX-C chromosomal break (shown in Fig 1). In each panel, a single secondary cell is indicated by a dashed line. In wild t...
Data
Abd-B expression in different fly lines used in this study. Shown are AGs from Canton S (A., B.), iab-6cocuD1/ iab-6cocuD1(C.,D.) or iab-6cocuD1/mir-iab-8 (E., F.) males, stained for Abd-B (A., C. and E. in green) and DAPI (B., D. and F. in blue). Scale = 25μm. (TIFF)
Data
UBX and EXD staining in control tissues. Panels are labeled in the figure. UBX can be seen in the abdominal lobe of the brain in the expected expression pattern ([29]). Cytoplasmic EXD can be seen in the central wing disc as reported in ([54]). Scale = 50μm. (TIFF)
Article
Aedes aegypti is a vector of medically important viruses including those causing Zika, dengue, and chikungunya. During mating, males transfer a number of proteins and other molecules to the female and these components of the male ejaculate are essential in shifting female post-mating behaviors in a number of insect species. Because these molecules...
Article
The ejaculatory bulb of Drosophila melanogaster males produces proteins and pheromones that play important roles in reproduction. This tissue is also the final mixing site for the ejaculate before transfer to the female. The ejaculatory bulb's dynamics remain largely unstudied. By microscopy of the ejaculatory bulb in maturing adult males, we obser...
Chapter
Full-text available
The seminal fluid of insects demonstrates complexity at several levels. At the molecular level, it includes numerous biochemical classes, with protein sequences varying across taxa. At the functional level, seminal components induce diverse changes in female behavior, physiology, and anatomy. At the structural level, seminal components can be packa...
Article
Some insects, such as Drosophila melanogaster, produce eggs by meroistic oogenesis. In this process, the developing oocyte remains connected by cytoplasmic bridges to its sister “nurse” cells, which synthesize molecules and organelles for the future embryo. In the ovary, shown brighter in this micro-CT (X-ray computed tomography) scan of the abdome...
Article
Male reproductive ageing has been mainly explained by a reduction in sperm quality with negative effects on offspring development and quality. In addition to sperm, males transfer seminal fluid proteins (Sfps) at mating; Sfps are important determinants of male reproductive success. Receipt of Sfps leads to female post-mating changes including physi...
Preprint
Egg activation is essential for the successful transition from a mature oocyte to a developmentally competent egg. It consists of a series of events including the resumption and completion of meiosis, initiation of translation of some maternal mRNAs and destruction of others, and changes to the vitelline envelope. This drastic change of cell state...
Article
Mating induces a multitude of changes in female behavior, physiology and gene expression. Interactions between female and male genotype lead to variation in post-mating phenotypes and reproductive success. So far, few female molecules responsible for these interactions have been identified. Here, we used Drosophila melanogaster from five geographic...
Article
Sperm storage in the mated female reproductive tract (RT) is required for optimal fertility in numerous species with internal fertilization. In Drosophila melanogaster, sperm storage is dependent on female receipt of seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) during mating. The seminal fluid protein Acp36DE is necessary for the accumulation of sperm into storag...
Chapter
This revised and updated second edition provides a comprehensive account of the human male gamete. Detailed overviews of human sperm production, maturation, and function - and how these processes affect and influence fertility, infertility, and assisted reproduction - are given. A wide range of new developments including proteomics, spermatogenesis...
Article
New genes arise through a variety of mechanisms, including the duplication of existing genes and the de novo birth of genes from non-coding DNA sequences. While there are numerous examples of duplicated genes with important functional roles, the functions of de novo genes remain largely unexplored. Many newly evolved genes are expressed in the male...
Article
![][1] By the early 1920s, the existence of mutations was well established, but how they could be generated remained a topic of lively speculation. One interesting case was the Drosophila Bar mutation ([Tice 1914][2]). While normal flies have round eyes, the X-linked mutation Bar ( B