Mariana Di Giacomo

Mariana Di Giacomo
Yale University | YU · Peabody Museum

Doctor of Philosophy

About

13
Publications
4,403
Reads
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214
Citations
Citations since 2016
6 Research Items
143 Citations
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Introduction
Natural History Conservator at Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. PhD in Preservation Studies from University of Delaware, MS in Zoology (Vertebrate Paleontology) and BS in Paleontology from Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay. I am a paleontologist and my most recent research has focused on fossil conservation, more specifically, the effects fossil preparation has on the long-term stability of fossils and on the chemical analyses scientists may want to do in the future.
Additional affiliations
September 2014 - present
Smithsonian Institution
Position
  • Fellow
September 2014 - May 2019
University of Delaware
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2011 - March 2014
Intendencia de Canelones
Position
  • Paleontologist
Description
  • Vertebrate paleontologist, Collection preparator and curator
Education
August 2014 - August 2019
University of Delaware
Field of study
  • Preservation Studies
May 2008 - August 2012
Universidad de la República de Uruguay
Field of study
  • Paleontology

Publications

Publications (13)
Chapter
Full-text available
Here, we will address further criticisms in terms of the weakness and the strength of our proposal that the AdV is more than a particularly rich paleontological site, and our consequent intent to take it from a possible archaeological site to a probable one. In doing this, we are attempting to make progress in the central debate about the AdV and t...
Article
Full-text available
The Arroyo del Vizcaíno collection began informally in 1997, when a group of high school students, teachers and other members of the community extracted around 300 bones from the Vizcaíno stream. Efforts were made by the students to prepare, catalogue and identify the remains, as well as to try to keep the remains in their hometown. The collection...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we present various activities shared with the community based on scientific knowledge related to the Arroyo del Vizcaíno site in Uruguay. This site, located on the outskirts of the city of Sauce, presents thousands of fossil bones of extinct giant mammals and evidence of pos-sible human presence. Since its discovery, the local comm...
Article
Full-text available
Species distribution models (SDMs) are helpful for understanding actual and potential biogeographical traits of organisms. These models have recently started to be applied in the study of fossil xenarthrans. SDMs were generated for 15 South American late Pleistocene xenarthrans: eight Cingulata (Glyptodon clavipes, Doedicurus clavicaudatus, Panocht...
Article
Full-text available
In Farina et al . [[1][1]], we claimed that a rich fossiliferous locality, Arroyo del Vizcaino (hereafter, AdV), with marked bones that are much older than widely accepted for human presence in the Americas, deserved ‘to be included in the agenda of early American peopling, either as a not
Article
Full-text available
The South American Pleistocene mammal fauna includes great-sized animals that have intrigued scientists for over two centuries. Here we intend to update the knowledge on its palaeoecology and provide new evidence regarding two approaches: energetics and population density and relative abundance of fossils per taxa. To determine whether an imbalance...
Article
Full-text available
Human-megafauna interaction in the Americas has great scientific and ethical interest because of its implications on Pleistocene extinction. The Arroyo del Vizcaíno site near Sauce, Uruguay has already yielded over 1000 bones belonging to at least 27 individuals, mostly of the giant sloth Lestodon. The assemblage shows some taphonomic features sugg...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal exposures of the Santa Cruz Formation (late–early Miocene, southern Patagonia, Argentina) between the Coyle and Gallegos rivers have been a fertile ground for recovery of Miocene vertebrates for more than 100 years. The formation contains an exceptionally rich mammal fauna, which documents a vertebrate assemblage very different from any liv...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Archived project
Research on the estimation of body mass in extinct vertebrates and on the effect of size on the natural history of organisms.
Project
Palaeocology, body size, biomechanics, extinction of the Pleistocene South American megafauna.