Marian E Berryhill

Marian E Berryhill
University of Nevada, Reno | UNR · Department of Psychology

PhD Dartmouth College

About

104
Publications
24,607
Reads
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3,060
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2016 - present
University of Nevada, Reno
Position
  • Professor
July 2010 - June 2016
University of Nevada, Reno
Position
  • Professor
January 2008 - June 2010
Temple University

Publications

Publications (104)
Article
Cognitive neuroscience currently conflates the study of serial responses (e.g., delay match to sample/nonsample, n-back) with the study of sequential operations. In this essay, our goal is to define and disentangle the latter, termed abstract cognitive task sequences (ACTS). Existing literatures address tasks requiring serial events, including proc...
Article
A primary goal of translational neuroscience is to identify the neural mechanisms of age-related cognitive decline and develop protocols to maximally improve cognition. Here, we demonstrate how interventions that apply noninvasive neurostimulation to older adults improve working memory (WM). We found that one session of sham-controlled transcranial...
Article
There has been growing interest in quantifying the proportion of women participating in scientific conferences, publications, and committees. Numbers reveal persistent disparities, but offer few cures to the root causes of the gender gaps in research. Toward remediation, we outline five lessons learned through organizing two conferences for Women i...
Article
Full-text available
Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), or concussion, accounts for 85% of all TBIs. Yet survivors anticipate full cognitive recovery within several months of injury, if not sooner, dependent upon the specific outcome/measure. Recovery is variable and deficits in executive function, e.g., working memory (WM) can persist years post-mTBI. We tested wheth...
Article
Full-text available
Background The goal of working memory (WM) training is to expand capacity of this executive function. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) paired with WM training is more consistent than either alone. We have reported that tDCS targeting frontal and/or parietal regions enhanced theta phase locking, reduced alpha power, and strengthened th...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on working memory (WM) performance are promising but variable and contested. In particular, designs involving one session of tDCS are prone to variable outcomes with notable effects of individual differences. Some participants benefit, whereas others are impaired by the same tDCS protoco...
Article
Full-text available
Have you ever felt “groggy” after hitting your head? We are learning more about how important it is to protect your brain from injuries, such as concussion. Concussion is also called mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). After an mTBI, most people think patients recover within a few weeks. We noticed that some college students who had had an mTBI wer...
Article
Full-text available
Despite considerable interest in enhancing, preserving, and rehabilitating working memory (WM), efforts to elicit sustained behavioral improvements have been met with limited success. Here, we paired WM training with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the frontoparietal network over four days. Active tDCS enhanced WM performance by m...
Poster
Full-text available
Visual motion perception relies on multiple cues to inform the observer of an object’s directionality. A new optical illusion (Z-Box illusion) was presented to examine which cues are necessary for generating an accurate perception of motion: structural-complexity, motion parallax. When viewing a rotating 3D particle sphere, participants’ accuracy f...
Article
Working memory (WM) can be improved after repeated training sessions paired with noninvasive neurostimulation techniques. Previously, we reported that WM training paired with tDCS succeeded behaviorally by enhancing anterior-posterior theta phase coherence and reducing alpha power. Here, in two experiments we tested several theta and alpha frequenc...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated whether a history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), or concussion, has any effect on visual working memory (WM) performance. In most cases, cognitive performance is thought to return to premorbid levels soon after injury, without further medical intervention. We tested this assumption in undergraduates, among whom a history of...
Article
Visual statistical learning (VSL) refers to the learning of environmental regularities. Classically considered an implicit process, one patient with isolated hippocampal damage is severely impaired at VSL tasks, suggesting involvement of explicit memory. Here, we asked whether memory impairment (MI) alone, absent of clear hippocampal pathology, pre...
Article
Using stimuli from different categories may expand the capacity limits of working memory (WM) by spreading item representations across distinct neural populations. We explored this mixed-category benefit by correlating individuals’ behavioral performance with fMRI measures of category information during uniform- and mixed-category trials. Behaviora...
Article
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory approach that is affordable, safe, and well tolerated. This review article summarizes the research and clinically relevant findings from meta-analyses and studies investigating the cognitive effects of tDCS in healthy and clinical populations. We recapitulate findings from recent s...
Article
Full-text available
Working memory (WM) permits maintenance of information over brief delays and is an essential executive function. Unfortunately, WM is subject to age-related decline. Some evidence supports the use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to improve visual WM. A gap in knowledge is an understanding of the mechanism characterizing these tDCS...
Article
Why are some visual stimuli remembered, whereas others are forgotten? A limitation of recognition paradigms is that they measure aggregate behavioral performance and/or neural responses to all stimuli presented in a visual working memory (VWM) array. To address this limitation, we paired an electroencephalography (EEG) frequency-tagging technique w...
Article
Visual statistical learning (VSL), the unsupervised learning of statistical contingencies across time and space, may play a key role in efficient and predictive encoding of the perceptual world. How VSL capabilities vary as a function of ongoing task demands is still poorly understood. VSL is modulated by selective attention and faces interference...
Article
Full-text available
Working memory (WM) training paired with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can improve executive function in older adults. The unclear mechanism of tDCS likely depends on tDCS intensity, and task relevant genetic factors (e.g., for WM: COMT val¹⁵⁸met, DAT, BDNF val⁶⁶met). Higher tDCS intensity does not always lead to greater cognitive...
Article
There is considerable interest in maintaining working memory (WM) because it is essential to accomplish most cognitive tasks, and it is correlated with fluid intelligence and ecologically valid measures of daily living. Toward this end, WM training protocols aim to improve WM capacity and extend improvements to unpracticed domains, yet success is l...
Article
There is great interest in enhancing and maintaining cognitive function. In recent years, advances in noninvasive brain stimulation devices, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), have targeted working memory in particular. Despite controversy surrounding outcomes of single-session studies, a growing field of working memory trainin...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to encode, store, and retrieve visually presented objects is referred to as visual working memory (VWM). Although crucial for many cognitive processes, previous research reveals that VWM strictly capacity limited. This capacity limitation is behaviorally observable in the set size effect: the ability to successfully report items in VWM...
Article
The role of the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) in working memory (WM) remains a topic of considerable debate and divergent findings within the literature have made this an even more complex problem. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies using foveally presented object arrays report bilateral IPS activity corresponding to the number of it...
Article
Visual working memory (VWM) is critical for guiding goal-directed behavior across interruptions such as saccades. Currently, training efforts aimed at improving VWM are expanding to include the use of non-invasive brain stimulation, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). One challenge is that the mechanism underlying training and t...
Article
Date Presented 4/8/2016 In older adults, we paired the neuroscience approaches working memory training and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with the occupational therapy goal of improved everyday cognition. Five laboratory sessions of training + tDCS elicited lasting gains on everyday cognitive tasks assessed in participants’ homes. P...
Article
Full-text available
There is growing interest in non-invasive brain stimulation techniques. A drawback is that the relationship between stimulation and cognitive outcomes for various tasks are unknown. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) provides diffuse current spread, whereas high-definition tDCS (HD-tDCS) provides more targeted current. The direction of...
Chapter
Children are not simply miniature adults. As such, the memory of a child is significantly different from the memory of an adult. Furthermore, the ability to form memories is not innate and instead develops over the first nearly two decades of life. Consequently, memory researchers working in the developmental domain must carefully design studies to...
Poster
It is well established that visual working memory is capacity limited with retrieval performance declining as set size increases. The vast majority of studies investigating working memory capacity have focused on the maintenance phase of working memory tasks. In a recent study we found that neural resources allocated to individual items during enco...
Poster
It is well established that Visual Working Memory is capacity limited. Recent behavioral research has demonstrated that perceptual grouping can facilitate the retrieval of items stored in working memory. At what stage and by what mechanism are these grouping effects manifesting? In order to answer this question we used high-density electroencephalo...
Article
Date Presented 4/16/2015 A combined intervention of transcranial direct current stimulation and a working memory (WM) training protocol significantly enhanced performance on both trained and transfer WM tasks in healthy older adults. The continuation of this research includes tasks with greater ecological validity.
Article
Full-text available
An increasing concern affecting a growing aging population is working memory (WM) decline. Consequently, there is great interest in improving or stabilizing WM, which drives expanded use of brain training exercises. Such regimens generally result in temporary WM benefits to the trained tasks but minimal transfer of benefit to untrained tasks. Pairi...
Article
Recent studies have demonstrated that factors influencing perception, such as Gestalt grouping cues, can influence the storage of information in visual working memory (VWM). In some cases, stationary cues, such as stimulus similarity, lead to superior VWM performance. However, the neural correlates underlying these benefits to VWM performance remai...
Article
Determining the role of intraparietal sulcus (IPS) regions in working memory (WM) remains a topic of considerable interest and lack of clarity. One group of hypotheses, the internal attention view, proposes that the IPS plays a material general role in maintaining information in WM. An alternative viewpoint, the pure storage account, proposes that...
Article
Full-text available
An increasing concern affecting a growing aging population is working memory (WM) decline. Consequently, there is great interest in improving or stabilizing WM, which drives expanded use of brain training exercises. Such regimens generally result in temporary WM benefits to the trained tasks but minimal transfer of benefit to untrained tasks. Pairi...
Article
Full-text available
Nearly 1.7 million Americans sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year. These injuries can result in physical, emotional, and cognitive consequences. While many individuals receive cognitive rehabilitation from occupational therapists (OTs), the interdisciplinary nature of TBI research makes it difficult to remain up-to-date on relevant find...
Article
Working memory (WM) capacity falls along a spectrum with some people demonstrating higher and others lower WM capacity. Efforts to improve WM include applying transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), in which small amounts of current modulate the activity of underlying neurons and enhance cognitive function. However, not everyone benefits eq...
Article
Full-text available
Research studies in psychology typically use two-dimensional (2D) images of objects as proxies for real-world three-dimensional (3D) stimuli. There are, however, a number of important differences between real objects and images that could influence cognition and behavior. Although human memory has been studied extensively, only a handful of studies...
Article
Full-text available
Neurostimulation, e.g., transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), shows promise as an effective cognitive intervention. In spite of low spatial resolution, limited penetration, and temporary influence, evidence highlights tDCS-linked cognitive benefits in a range of cognitive domains. The left posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is an accessible...
Article
Research studies in psychology typically use two-dimensional (2D) images of objects as proxies for real-world three-dimensional (3D) stimuli. There are, however, a number of important differences between real objects and images that could influence cognition and behavior. Although human memory has been studied extensively, only a handful of studies...
Article
What happens to the representations of items in visual working memory (VWM) when attention shifts to a single item? Here, we investigated the fate of these uncued items using a retroactive cuing paradigm. This paradigm presents attentional cues after the VWM maintenance duration but prior to memory test. The retro-cue was either neutral cue (no inf...
Article
Full-text available
The popularity of non-invasive brain stimulation techniques in basic, commercial, and applied settings grew tremendously over the last decade. Here, we focus on one popular neurostimulation method: transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Many assumptions regarding the outcomes of tDCS are based on the results of stimulating motor cortex. Fo...
Article
Full-text available
The contents of visual working memory (VWM) are capacity limited and require frequent updating. The retrospective cueing (retro-cueing) paradigm clarifies how directing internal attention among VWM items boosts VWM performance. In this paradigm a cue appears prior to retrieval, but after encoding and maintenance. The retro-cue effect (RCE) refers t...
Article
Full-text available
The retro-cue effect (RCE) describes superior working memory performance for validly cued stimulus locations long after encoding has ended. Importantly, this happens with delays beyond the range of iconic memory. In general, the RCE is a stable phenomenon that emerges under varied stimulus configurations and timing parameters. We investigated its s...
Article
Full-text available
Color losses of central origin (cerebral achromatopsia and dyschromatopsia) can result from cortical damage and are most commonly associated with stroke. Such cases have the potential to provide useful information regarding the loci of the generation of the percept of color. One available tool to examine this issue is the chromatic visual evoked po...
Article
Full-text available
Visual working memory (VWM) is essential for many cognitive processes, yet it is notably limited in capacity. Visual perception processing is facilitated by Gestalt principles of grouping, such as connectedness, similarity, and proximity. This introduces the question, do these perceptual benefits extend to VWM? If so, can this be an approach to enh...
Article
Full-text available
Complex cognitive tasks such as visual working memory (WM) involve networks of interacting brain regions. Several neurotransmitters, including an appropriate dopamine concentration, are important for WM performance. A number of gene polymorphisms are associated with individual differences in cognitive task performance. COMT, for example, encodes ca...
Article
Full-text available
Prior studies have reported instances of both intact and impaired working memory (WM) performance in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In order to investigate the relation between autistic traits that extend into the normal population and WM, 104 normal college-aged students who varied in their levels of autistic traits were tested. The l...
Article
Full-text available
The nature of parietal contributions to working memory (WM) remain poorly understood but of considerable interest. We previously reported that posterior parietal damage selectively impaired WM probed by recognition (Berryhill & Olson, 2008a). Recent studies provided support using a neuromodulatory technique, transcranial direct current stimulation...
Article
It is well known that Gestalt grouping principles facilitate visual perception. However, it is unclear how or to what extent these grouping principles benefit visual working memory (VWM). Because VWM is subject to strict capacity limitations, anything that facilitates VWM could serve to significantly expand VWM capacity. Previous findings show that...
Article
Full-text available
The role of posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in various forms of memory is a current topic of interest in the broader field of cognitive neuroscience. This large cortical region has been linked with a wide range of mnemonic functions affecting each stage of memory processing: encoding, maintenance, and retrieval. Yet, the precise role of the PPC in...
Article
Cognitive performance, including performance on working memory (WM) tasks declines with age. Changes in brain activations are one presumed contributor to WM decline in the healthy aging population. In particular, neuroimaging studies show that when older adults perform WM tasks there tends to be greater bilateral frontal activity than in younger ad...
Article
Full-text available
Attention operates perceptually on items in the environment, and internally on objects in visuospatial working memory. In the present study, we investigated whether spatial and temporal constraints affecting endogenous perceptual attention extend to internal attention. A retro-cue paradigm in which a cue is presented beyond the range of iconic memo...
Chapter
Cognitive disorders include dementia, amnesia, and delirium. In these disorders, patients are no longer fully oriented to time and space. Depending on the cause, the diagnosis of a cognitive disorder may be temporary or progressive. For example, delirium is temporary whereas dementia (e.g., Alzheimer's disease) is generally progressive and unrelent...