Mariam Kholany

Mariam Kholany
University of Aveiro | UA · Department of Chemistry

Master of Biotechnology

About

7
Publications
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78
Citations
Introduction
Mariam Kholany is currently a PhD student/researcher at the research group "Process and Product Applied Thermodynamics" (PATh), CICECO - Aveiro Institute of Materials, University of Aveiro, Portugal. Her major interests are the development of integrated processes for the purification of pharmaceuticals and bio-active compounds and the biorefinery concept associated to marine biomass, envisioning new natural-bio-based products.

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
Full-text available
Microalgae have an outstanding capacity to efficiently produce value-added compounds. They have been inspiring researchers worldwide to develop a blue biorefinery, supporting the development of the bioeconomy, tackling the environmental crisis, and mitigating the depletion of natural resources. In this review, the characteristics of the carotenoids...
Article
This work aims to take full advantage of ionic liquids’ (ILs) “designer solvent” nature in order to expand the applicability of solid-liquid biphasic systems (SLBS) as alternative chiral resolution techniques. To this purpose, twelve chiral ILs, bearing chirality on the cation or the anion, were used as chiral selectors in SLBS to selectively preci...
Article
BACKGROUND The demand for colorants from natural bio‐based sources is increasing. Violacein is a natural purple‐blue hydrophobic pigment with interesting bioactivity whose expression in genetically modified Yarrowia lipolytica production was successfully achieved. RESULTS In this work, several surfactants were tested in the extraction of violacein...
Article
A tuneable thermoresponsive system based on combinations of sodium dodecyl sulfate surfactant with tetrabutylammonium chloride salt is presented as an integrated process for the solid-liquid extraction of violacein from bio-engineered...
Article
This work aims at extending the applicability of chiral aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) to enantioseparations by using chiral ionic liquids (CILs) simultaneously as phase forming agents and chiral selectors. After determining the ternary phase diagrams of ABS composed of CILs and salts, these were used to ascertain the CIL structure on the ABS aptit...
Article
Aiming at outlining new strategies for the valorization of solid pharmaceutical wastes as viable alternatives to incineration, this work proposes the use of ionic liquids-based three phase partitioning (IL-based TPP) systems. Ibuprofen, naproxen and ketoprofen, all belonging to the class of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), were adopt...
Article
Full-text available
Aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) based on Pluronic L-35, a (EO)x-(PO)y-(EO)x triblock copolymer, were determined and applied in the separation of two structurally similar flavonoids (naringin and rutin). Two sets of phase formers were paired with Pluronic L-35, one comprising conventional salts/buffer and other including cholinium-based ionic liquids...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Since the early 90s, the continuous input of pharmaceuticals into the environment has brought environmental chemists and toxicologists to join forces in order to tackle obstacles and answer questions regarding the eventual risk posed by such compounds to human and environmental health. One of the main challenges in the area of analytical chemistry is the development of procedures for the identification, quantification and determination analysis of pharmaceuticals in environmental or biological samples. A major group of pharmaceuticals that consist a problem when it comes to ERA approaches concerning environmental impact, are antineoplastic agents (AAs) as they may represent specific risks to non-target species and eventually their mixtures, as little is known about their potential to e.g. fish. Besides, in terms of mechanistic knowledge, single exposures are little informative as they do not consider mixture exposure profiles and time-varying toxic effects. Therefore, there is an urgent need for an integrative approach of AAs assessment in the aquatic environment in order to address the gaps mentioned.Hence, the VitroTox project will answer six main questions: Q.1: Can HPLC-DAD be used for the identification and quantification of AAs in the aquatic environment? Q.2: Does single and joint exposure of AAs cause eco- and genotoxicity to embryos and ELS of D. rerio? Q.3: Does single and joint exposure of AAs cause cytotoxicity to ZF cell lines? Q.4: How AAs modulate protein expression in vivo and in vitro? Q.5: Can results obtained from the AAs exposure in vitro be extrapolated to in vivo? Q.6: Can single and joint environmental toxicity of AAs be predicted using modelling approaches? To address those questions, the VitroTox project goes beyond the state-of-the art and gathers expertise from different research areas highlighting the importance of using an integrative and multidisciplinary approach by i) developing chromatographic methodologies for AAs quantification in aquatic and biological samples, ii) combining different biological matrices (in vivo/in vitro) and creating a link between diverse endpoints, in order to iii) investigate the potential of cell lines to serve as proxy to in vivo for the single and joint toxicity assessment of AAs and finally, iv) to assist in the model development for single and joint toxicity of AAs predictions.