Maria Koinova

Maria Koinova
The University of Warwick · Department of Politics & International Studies

17.62
 · 
PhD
About
29
Research items
2,366
Reads
343
Citations
Research Experience
Oct 2013 - Nov 2014
Uppsala University
Position
  • Visiting Forum Scholar
Aug 2012
The University of Warwick
Position
  • Reader in International Relations
Jan 2012 - Jun 2012
Dutch Institute on Advanced Studies
Position
  • Research Scholar
Network
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Following
Projects
Projects (2)
Project
In 2011 Dr. Maria Koinova won the highly competitive Starting Grant of the European Research Council to work on a five year project “Diasporas and Contested Sovereignty.” She directs a team of four researchers (PI, post-doc, two Ph.D. researchers) who investigate the transnational mobilization of conflict-generated diasporas in Europe and their impact on polities experiencing contested sovereignty in the Balkans, the Caucasus, and the Middle East. The project progresses from qualitative analysis of elite-based diaspora mobilization of six groups (Albanian, Armenian, Bosnian, Iraqi, Kurdish, and Palestinian) in five EU countries (UK, Netherlands, Sweden, Germany and France) to a quantitative analysis through a cross-country representative survey of non-elite individuals in 25 country-groups. Within the larger ERC project, Koinova has a sub-project to investigate diaspora mobilization vis-à-vis de facto states.
Research
Research items (29)
Article
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Transitional justice and diaspora studies are interdisciplinary and expanding fields of study. Finding the right combination of mechanisms to forward transitional justice in post-conflict polities is an ongoing challenge for states and affected populations. Diasporas, as non-state actors with increased agency in homelands, host-lands, and other glo...
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This article brings a fresh perspective to the causal mechanism of coalition-building among diasporas pursuing genocide recognition, particularly horizontal alliances between the Armenian, Assyrian, and Kurdish diasporas. Why, how, and how durably do diasporas build coalitions to address past atrocities? Building coalitions for genocide recognition...
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The relationship of states to populations beyond their borders is of increasing interest to those seeking to understand the international politics of migration. This introduction to the special issue of International Political Science Review on diasporas and sending states provides an overview of existing explanations for why states reach out to di...
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How do parties in government and opposition in a contested post-conflict state reach out to their diasporas abroad? Do their policies overlap or differ, and if so why? Scholarly accounts of sending states’ outreach towards diasporas have paid little attention to the variety of actors and processes within sending states, and have grouped states with...
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Diaspora politics is of growing interest to international relations (IR), yet theorizing about sending states’ engagement of diasporas in different global contexts has been minimal. Central to this article is the question: how do challenges to postconflict statehood shape a sending state's diaspora engagement? I provide a fresh sociospatial perspec...
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This article presents a new positional perspective for the analysis of diaspora mobilization in international relations (IR), seeking to shift debates beyond realist, liberalist, and constructivist thinking, and speaking to a cluster of sociopositional theories in IR. It provides a conceptual discussion and empirical illustrations of diaspora posit...
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This special issue seeks to move the scholarly conversation beyond notions of conflict-generated diasporas as simply agents of conflict or peace. The field is ripe to unpack the notion of context for diaspora mobilisation in International Relations, the focus and novelty of this special issue. Theorising in this volume goes beyond current prevalent...
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Scholarship on conflict-generated diasporas has identified the need to consider diaspora mobilisations in multiple contexts and how they are affected by local and global processes. I argue that diasporas react with mobilisations to global events that take place not only in host-states and home-states but also in other locations to which diasporas a...
Chapter
Mobilising for genocide recognition has been central for sustaining the Armenian diaspora for over a century. This chapter analyses how genocide recognition claims become sustained through conflict and cooperation, internal and external to the Armenian diaspora. Internally, activists have been involved in cooperation with different diaspora sub-gro...
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Scholarship on transitional justice, transnational social movements, and transnational diaspora mobilization has offered little understanding about how memorialization initiatives with substantial diaspora involvement emerge transnational and are embedded and sustained in different contexts. We argue that diasporas play a galvanizing role in transn...
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There is increased interest in the connectivity of migrants with both their host-lands and their original homelands. This article brings a social movement perspective to bear on the issue of diaspora mobilization. Why do conflict-generated diasporas from the same original homeland and living in the same host-land mobilize in sustained versus episod...
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Over the past decade, diaspora mobilization has become of increasing interest to International Relations scholars who study terrorism, civil wars and transnational social movements and networks. Nevertheless, an important area remains under-researched: conditions, causal mechanisms and processes of diaspora mobilization vis-a-vis emerging states, e...
Chapter
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How does the political context of a host-land influence the transnational mobilization of conflict-generated diasporas?1 This question is highly relevant in a globalized world where migrants are the economic, social and political link between different countries. But the question is still poorly understood by relevant streams of thought, such as tr...
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This comparative study explores the conditions and causal pathways through which conflict-generated diasporas become moderate or radical actors when linked to homelands experiencing limited sovereignty. Situated at the nexus of scholarship on diasporas and conflict, ethnic lobbying in foreign policy, and transnationalism this article develops four...
Book
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"Koinova . . . is interested in why ethnonationalist conflicts vary in the level of violence they generate, why violence at whatever level persists, and when and why things change for the better or the worse. To get at the answers, she explores three cases, similar in their characteristics but different in their outcomes: Bulgaria (where majority-m...
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This contribution to a forum on "Diasporas and IR" aspires to elucidate theoretical connections between International Relations as a discipline, and the under-theorized study of transnational diaspora poliics. It discusses two important concepts: "autonomy" of diaspora agents vis-a-vis original homelands, and their "positionality," or positions of...
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This article examines the impact of diasporas on secessionist conflicts, focusing on the Albanian, Armenian and Chechen diasporas and the conflicts in Kosovo, Karabakh and Chechnya during the 1990s. How do diasporas radicalize these conflicts? I argue that despite differences in diaspora communal characteristics and the types of the secessionist co...
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This article argues that from the very start of the transition process in Macedonia, a fusion of concerns about security and democratisation locked local nationalist elites and international organisations into a political dynamic that prioritised security over democratisation. This dynamic resulted in little progress in the implementation of human...
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Conflict-generated diasporas are considered likely to maintain radical behaviours. This article seeks to explain why and how they nevertheless adopt moderate claims, especially when advocating highly sensitive issues such as state sovereignty. Focusing on groups in the US I investigate the Lebanese diaspora linked to the pro-sovereignty movement in...
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Why did ethnonational conflicts reach different degrees of violence during the 1990s: high in Kosovo, middle-ranged in Macedonia, and low in Bulgaria? This article analyzes the relationship between the Albanians of Macedonia and Kosovo, the Turks of Bulgaria, and their respective states. Challenging democratization and security dilemma theories, it...
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If diaspora communities are socialized with democratic values in Western societies, they could be expected to be sympathetic to the democratization of their home countries. However, there is a high degree of variation in their behavior. Contrary to the predominant understanding in the literature that diasporas act in exclusively nationalist ways, t...
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Based on extensive research among conflict-generated diasporas — Albanians, Armenians, Lebanese, Serbians, Ukrainians, and Chechens predominantly living in the U.S. — I argue here that academics and policy-makers alike need to revisit the notion that diasporas are not likely agents of moderate transnational politics. Radical and moderate diaspora a...
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Albania and Turkey did not act in overtly irredentist ways towards their ethnic brethren in neighboring states after the end of communism. Why, nonetheless, did Albania facilitate the increase of ethnic conflict in Kosovo and Macedonia, while Turkey did not, with respect to the Turks of Bulgaria? I argue that kin-states undergoing transition are mo...