Maria Sagot

Maria Sagot
State University of New York at Oswego | SUNY Oswego · Department of Biological Sciences

Ph.D

About

18
Publications
2,984
Reads
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121
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
August 2012 - June 2014
Texas Tech University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
August 2005 - May 2012
Louisiana State University
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences
January 1999 - July 2004
University of Costa Rica
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Long-term social aggregations are maintained by multiple mechanisms, including the use of acoustic signals, which may nonetheless entail significant energetic costs. To date, however, no studies have gauged whether there are significant energetic costs to social call production in bats, which heavily rely on acoustic communication for a diversity o...
Preprint
Full-text available
Long-term social aggregations are maintained by multiple mechanisms, including the use of acoustic signals, which may nonetheless entail significant energetic costs. To date, however, no studies have gauged whether there are significant energetic costs to social call production in bats, which heavily rely on acoustic communication for a diversity o...
Article
The North American beaver Castor canadensis is widely recognized for its ability to modify freshwater habitats and facilitate changes in community composition. However, the seasonal composition of terrestrial wildlife at littoral beaver lodges remains poorly described, even though these structures are distinctive semi-permanent features of the terr...
Article
Full-text available
To maintain group cohesion while coordinating group movements, individuals might use signals to advertise the location of a route, their intention to initiate movements, or their position at a given time. In highly mobile animals, the latter is often accomplished through contact calls that are emitted at different rates by group members. Here, we d...
Article
To maximize energy gained and minimize energy expended, animals should forage in a manner that gives them the largest benefit at the lowest cost. Species living in seasonal environments in the northeastern US, such as the Glaucomys volans (Southern Flying Squirrel), need to overcome high energetic demands associated with thermoregulation and food a...
Article
Full-text available
Keywords: animal personality bat behavioural syndrome contact call Thyroptera tricolor Individuals benefit from socially acquired information to avoid predation risks and enhance foraging efficiency. Spix's disc-winged bats, Thyroptera tricolor, form very stable social groups despite their need to find a new roosting site daily. Thyroptera tricolor...
Article
Full-text available
Populations that have historically been isolated from each other are expected to differ in some heritable features. This divergence could be due to drift (and other mechanisms of neutral evolution) or differential adaptation of populations to local conditions. Discriminating between these two evolutionary trajectories can be difficult, but when pos...
Article
Full-text available
Same-sex sexual behaviors (SSSB) have been recorded in nearly all major animal groups and are often found in populations with skewed sex ratios (SR). Here, we study the role of sex ratios in the frequency of SSSB to better understand the conditions that give rise to such puzzling behaviors. We observed SSSB in multiple populations of the common fru...
Article
Full-text available
Although coloniality is widespread among mammals, it is still not clear what factors influence composition of social groups. As animals need to adapt to multiple habitat and environmental conditions throughout their range, variation in group composition should be influenced by adaptive adjustment to different ecological factors. Relevant to anthrop...
Data
Figure S1. Haplotype network of sampled U. bilobatum. Colors represent different social groups. Each black line between black points indicates one point of mutation. Groups 1 2, 3, 11 and 12 are from Sarapiquí. Groups 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 are from Carara.
Chapter
Full-text available
There is a wide variety of ecological factors that can potentially act as selective pressures driving the evolution of social behavior in bats. For instance, many behavioral ecologists recognize a relationship between social behavior, geographic distribution, and variation in resource abundance and distribution. Moreover, some bat species can use p...
Article
Understanding causes and consequences of ecological specialization is of major concern in conservation. Specialist species are particularly vulnerable to human activities. If their food or habitats are depleted or lost, they may not be able to exploit alternative resources, and population losses may result. We examined International Union for Conse...
Article
We review the known records of desert shrews from Nevada and report the results of genetic analyses of a specimen from Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada, which help clarify the evolutionary relationships of the genus Notiosorex from southwestern United States.
Article
Full-text available
In the Neotropics, Peter’s tent-roosting bat (Uroderma bilobatum) is an important keystone species. U. bilobatum promotes plant community diversity and secondary succession, and is becoming more abundant in human-modified habitats where it roosts in non-native plants. Although this change in roosting preferences can have detrimental consequences to...
Article
Understanding species-specific habitat selection is essential to identify how natural systems are assembled and maintained, and how emerging natural and anthropogenic disturbances will affect ecosystem function. In the Neotropics, Peter's tent-roosting bat (Uroderma bi-lobatum), known to roost in forests, has become abundant in human-modified areas...
Article
Full-text available
Social animals regularly face the problem of relocating conspecifics when separated. Communication is one of the most important mechanisms facilitating group formation and cohesion. Known as contact calls, signals exchanged between conspecifics that permit group maintenance are widespread across many taxa. Foliage-roosting bats are an excellent mod...
Article
Although multiple hypotheses have been proposed to explain group formation, few fully explain the diversity of social interactions found in foliage-roosting bats. Among these bats, tent-roosting species are capable of constructing their own shelters. Although many bats utilize tents previously constructed by other species, it has been suggested tha...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I have a funded research project, but not enough funds to help pay for stipends. Does anyone know of any funding opportunities specifically to help pay for student stipend in ecological research?

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Determine associated energetic costs/benefits of foraging and signaling in social vs solitary settings