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Maria C Ruiz-Jaen

Maria C Ruiz-Jaen
Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) · Forestry

PhD

About

19
Publications
23,085
Reads
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3,748
Citations
Citations since 2017
2 Research Items
2159 Citations
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Introduction
Working on: Community-based forestry, community-based forest monitoring, Empowering local communities to combat climate change, National Forest Monitoring Systems and REDD+/Paris Agreement
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - present
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Position
  • Community-based Forestry and Forest Monitoring Specialist for REDD+
February 2011 - December 2011
University of Oxford
Position
  • Researcher
January 2006 - December 2009
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Position
  • Researcher
Education
September 2005 - May 2011
McGill University
Field of study
  • Tropical Forest Ecology
September 2001 - December 2004
University of Puerto Rico at Rio Piedras
Field of study
  • Restoration Ecology
March 1994 - December 1997
Universidad de Panamá
Field of study
  • Botany

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
• Linking tree diversity to carbon storage can provide further motivation to conserve tropical forests and to design carbon-enriched plantations. Here, we examine the role of tree diversity and functional traits in determining carbon storage in a mixed-species plantation and in a natural tropical forest in Panama. • We used species richness, functi...
Article
Full-text available
Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) is likely to be central to a post-Kyoto climate change mitigation agreement. As such, identifying conditions and factors that will shape the success or failure of a reduced deforestation scheme will provide important insights for policy planning. Given that protected...
Article
Full-text available
Forests are of major importance to human society, contributing several crucial ecosystem services. Biodiversity is suggested to positively influence multiple services but evidence from natural systems at scales relevant to management is scarce. Here, across a scale of 400,000 km(2), we report that tree species richness in production forests shows p...
Article
Full-text available
The criteria of restoration success should be clearly estab- lished to evaluate restoration projects. Recently, the Soci- ety of Ecological Restoration International (SER) has produced a Primer that includes ecosystem attributes that should be considered when evaluating restoration success. To determine how restoration success has been evaluated in...
Article
Estimating α‐diversity and species distributions provide baseline information to understand factors such as biodiversity loss and erosion of ecosystem services. Yet, species surveys typically cover a small portion of any country's landmass. Public, global databases could help, but contain biases. Thus, the magnitude of bias should be identified and...
Article
Net primary productivity (NPP) is one of the most important parameters in describing the functioning of any ecosystem and yet it arguably remains a poorly quantified and understood component of carbon cycling in tropical forests, especially outside of the Americas. We provide the first comprehensive analysis of NPP and its carbon allocation to wood...
Article
1. Plant functional traits, in particular specific leaf area (SLA), wood density and seed mass, are often good predictors of individual tree growth rates within communities. Individuals and species with high SLA, low wood density and small seeds tend to have faster growth rates. 2. If community-level relationships between traits and growth have gen...
Data
Full-text available
Supplementary Figures S1-S3 and Supplementary Tables S1-S6
Article
Full-text available
The conversion of tropical montane cloud forest (TMCF) to pastures and agricultural lands has been an important activity in this life zone for many years. Although forest clearing and grazing continues, in some areas, changing political, economic, and social drivers have led to the abandonment of marginal areas. These dynamics provide an excellent...
Article
Full-text available
A trade-off between growth and mortality rates characterizes tree species in closed canopy forests. This trade-off is maintained by inherent differences among species and spatial variation in light availability caused by canopy-opening disturbances. We evaluated conditions under which the trade-off is expressed and relationships with four key funct...
Article
Many experimental studies show that a decline in species number has a negative effect on ecosystem function, however less is known about this pattern in natural communities. We examined the relative importance of environment, space, and diversity on ecosystem function, specifically tree carbon storage in four plant types (understory/canopy; trees/p...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Experimental studies assessing the role of diversity in ecosystem functioning manipulated diversity level to measure the response of selected ecosystem function. However, in the natural forest, such direct manipulation of diversity is not possible. To address this issue, we used stratified random sampling to create diffe...
Article
Full-text available
Rapid urban growth has increased the importance of restoring degraded vegetation patches within these areas. In this study, we reforested a site that was previously dominated by exotic grasses within an urban area. The goal of this study was to evaluate restoration success in a reforested site using four variables of vegetation structure, five grou...
Article
Full-text available
Most restoration projects have focused on recovery of vegetation to assess restoration success. Nevertheless if the goal of a restoration project is to create an ecosystem that is self-supporting and resilient to perturbation, we also need information on the recovery of other trophic levels and ecosystem processes. To provide an example on how to a...
Article
Abtract Restoration success was measured in a reforested karst valley in Puerto Rico. The success was determined by assessing the recovery of ecological integrity. This measure comprises: structural complexity, biodiversity, and ecosystem processes. The measures of structural complexity included grass cover, litter layers, foliage layers, and basal...

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