Maria Rodgers

Maria Rodgers
Victoria University of Wellington · School of Architecture

Bachelor of Fine Arts, Master of Landscape Architecture
Member of the Te Ātea – Spatial Justice Co-design Lab.

About

6
Publications
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Introduction
Maria Rodgers is currently a PhD candidate and teaching fellow at the Wellington School of Architecture, Victoria University of Wellington -Te Herenga Waka. She is particularly interested in the use of plants by Indigenous people, planting design, natural heritage, tactical urbanism and cultural landscapes.

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
Globally, large cities are implementing guidelines to ensure that environment, economics and sociality are at the forefront of urban design. Promotion of healthier streets has created new opportunities for social and commercial interaction and more inclusive outcomes. However, while most megacity streets share commonalities, the streets in medium-d...
Article
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A singular and modest activist action, a temporary park created in San Francisco, grew into the global urban Park(ing) Day (PD) phenomenon. This tactical urbanism event not only expanded to be annually celebrated in thousands of parking lots all over the world but became an inspiration for urban planning and policy changes. The permanent rendition...
Article
Full-text available
As with many Indigenous cultures, the Māori connection to the land in Aotearoa-New Zealand has been weakened by colonization, urbanization and other factors. In particular, Māori youth in their progressively technological world, experience a disconnection from their culture and their land (whenua). Using a participatory design method and designing...
Article
Full-text available
A military lifestyle can have profound impacts on an individual’s health and wellbeing. Increasingly, new technologies such as the creation of Virtual Reality (VR) are being explored as bridging mecha-nisms to provide ‘space’ and to aid with other therapies. The overarching research programme investi-gates the therapeutic and social qualities of la...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
As an option for improving the health of older persons in the community, outdoor therapeutic landscapes are a theoretical ideal, yet there is a paucity of information about what constitutes appropriate or safe landscape design or implementation. This project seeks to establish an assessment tool for quantitative analysis of variables used in outdoor therapeutic landscape design. It will address this by focusing on surfaces commonly used in the design and development of such landscapes, taking into account the various ethnic and cultural influences that contribute to holistic elements of landscape design. The information generated will inform the safe development of public, purpose-built outdoor interactive facilities so they can be age-appropriate and effective social, community, and rehabilitation options. This proposal challenges current design paradigms and engages with Matauranga Maori to develop a tool that will inform therapeutic and rehabilitation landscape design, utilising cross/multi-disciplinary approaches to inform project development. This project aims to create an assessment tool that will inform the safe and appropriate design and implementation of outdoor interactive landscapes for older persons. The objectives of this research project are to evaluate and compare existing and prototype surface assessment devices and to develop a quantitative system for assessing outdoor environments for their accessibility and their ability to safely deliver rehabilitative exercise opportunities. It will measure the characteristics of surfaces used in outdoor interactive landscapes, assessing the degree of accessibility through a series of test surfaces by using existing and prototyped landscapes. This will allow the development of an assessment tool and guidelines that promote safe, age-appropriate physical and mental challenges for older persons.
Project
This research centres on promoting health and social well-being for the elderly in our community, specifically in locations where Maori make up a disproportionately large number of the disadvantaged population. This application seeks to undertake work that is vital to linking our recently acquired HRC project funding with our much larger, community-integrated proposal that is targeting the National Science Challenge. It aims to strengthen our understanding of the traditional knowledge bases of indigenous cultures with respect to health, rehabilitation and well-being, providing information essential to evidence-based development of our research programme. It will focus on delivering information that will underpin how we keep elderly populations healthy and independent, assist integration of indigenous health frameworks for elderly Maori and detail how we can improve health and disability service delivery outcomes for the elderly while serving as a vehicle for further developments in community-based health approaches.