Maria Minda Oriña

Maria Minda Oriña
St. Olaf College · Psychology

Ph.D.

About

17
Publications
14,528
Reads
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1,148
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2008 - present
St. Olaf College
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2006 - August 2008
University of Minnesota Twin Cities
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2003 - August 2006
Michigan State University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
August 1998 - December 2002
Texas A&M University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Employing a behavioral observation paradigm, we tested whether high-trust partners buffered the reactions of low-trust partners during a conflict discussion to create more positive post-conflict outcomes, or whether low-trust partners pulled down high-trust partners to create more negative post-conflict outcomes. ninety-five married couples discuss...
Article
In a behavioral observation study with dating couples, we examined (a) how attachment orientations predict humor use and (b) how people respond to their partners' use of humor. Couples were videotaped while trying to resolve a relationship conflict. Each discussion was rated on several theoretically relevant dimensions. Highly avoidant individuals...
Article
We tested hypotheses concerning the developmental roots of becoming the "weak-link" (less committed) partner in adult romantic relationships and the associations between partners' absolute and relative levels of commitment and dyadic outcomes. We examined 78 target 20- to 21-year-olds who were involved in a romantic relationship and who had been st...
Article
The current studies tested how attachment orientations are related to empathic accuracy (i.e., the accuracy with which one infers a partner's private thoughts and feelings) during attachment-relevant discussions. In Study 1, married couples were videotaped discussing a severe or a less severe relationship issue that involved intimacy or jealousy. I...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined how, in the context of marital relationships, influence agents attempt to change their partners' stated opinions, and how influence targets respond to their partners' requests. Guided by a dyadic model of social influence, we hypothesized that the level of perceived closeness of both the influence agent and the influence target...
Article
Inspired by attachment theory, the authors tested a series of theoretically derived predictions about connections between attachment working models (attachment to one's parents assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview; M. Main & R. Goldwyn, 1994) and the effectiveness of specific types of caregiving spontaneously displayed by dating partners duri...
Article
Four experiments examined whether group formation and positive in-group regard require interaggregate comparison as the in-group-requires-an-out-group assumption of the metacontrast principle implies. The authors fostered novel social aggregates with or without a contrasting aggregate with which members could compare and varied intra-aggregate fact...
Article
This study tested predictions from W. Ickes and J. A. Simpson's (1997, 2001) empathic accuracy model. Married couples were videotaped as they tried to resolve a problem in their marriage. Both spouses then viewed a videotape of the interaction, recorded the thoughts and feelings they had at specific time points, and tried to infer their partner's t...
Article
In this study, we examined how close relationship partners spontaneously influence each other while they discussed an existing problem in their relationship. According to theories of social influence, people in important, self-defining relationships should experience the relationship itself as a potent source of influence. Thus, they are likely to...
Article
This study examined how working models of attachment to parents (assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview—AAI) and romantic partners (assessed by the Adult Attachment Questionnaire—AAQ) predicted spontaneous caregiving and care seeking in a stressful situation. Dating couples were videotaped while one partner (the man) waited to do a stressful ta...
Article
In this study, women were told they would engage in an anxiety-provoking activity. Women then waited with their dating partner for the activity to begin. During this 5-min "stress" period, each couple's interaction was videotaped unobtrusively. Each couple was then told that the woman would not have to do the stressful activity, and each couple was...
Article
Thesis (M.S.)--Texas A & M University, 1998. Includes bibliographical references (p. 49-54). "Major subject: Psychology." Vita.

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