Maria Pia Miglietta

Maria Pia Miglietta
Texas A&M University - Galveston | TAMUG · Department of Marine Biology

Ph.D. Duke U.
Associate Professor, Texas A&M at Galveston

About

41
Publications
21,536
Reads
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1,406
Citations
Citations since 2016
15 Research Items
750 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
Additional affiliations
January 2014 - present
Texas A&M University - Galveston
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
January 2010 - December 2013
University of Notre Dame
Position
  • Research Assistant
January 2008 - present
Pennsylvania State University

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
Full-text available
The commercially important Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, recruits to bays and estuarine habitats from planktonic megalopal larvae throughout the eastern United States. These megalopae engage in vertical and horizontal swimming to reach a location of primary settlement, most commonly seagrass beds. These benthic habitats provide food and...
Article
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The Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico is a carbonate platform well-known for extensive karst networks of densely stratified aquifer ecosystems. This aquifer supports diverse anchialine fauna, including species of the globally distributed anchialine shrimp genus Typhlatya (Atyidae). Four species (T. campecheae, T. pearsei, T. dzilamensis and T. mitchelli) a...
Article
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The Cassiopea genus is an emergent focus for behavioral, ecological, and genetic research. Cassiopea ephyrae, a key intermediate in the life cycle of this benthic jellyfish, have been left out of much work on the genus. Here we investigate the Cassiopea xamachana ephyra response to six combinations of light and feeding regimes. We show that zero li...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico is a carbonate platform well-known for extensive karst networks of densely stratified aquifer ecosystems. This aquifer supports diverse anchialine fauna, including species of the globally distributed atyid shrimp genus Typhlatya. Four species (T. campecheae, T. pearsei, T. dzilamensis and T. mitchelli) are endemic to t...
Article
Full-text available
To gather insight on the genetic network of cell reprogramming and reverse development in a non-model cnidarian system, we produced and annotated a transcriptome of the hydrozoan Turritopsis dohrnii, whose medusae respond to damage or senescence by metamorphosing into a juvenile stage (the polyp), briefly passing through an intermediate and unchara...
Article
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Jellyfish are known to carry various epibionts, including many of the subphylum Crustacea. However, the associations between gelatinous zooplankton and other invertebrates have been chronically overlooked. Crustacea, a massive clade of economically, ecologically, and culturally important species, includes many taxa that utilize gelatinous zooplankt...
Article
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The northern Gulf of Mexico has been an important source for crude oil and natural gas extraction since the 1930s. Thousands of fixed platforms and associated equipment have been installed on the Gulf of Mexico continental shelf, leading to a pervasive ‘ocean sprawl.’ After decommissioning, 100s of these structures have been converted to artificial...
Article
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Jellyfish are important components of marine food webs and form problematic blooms that negatively impact human enterprise. Jellyfish of the genus Aurelia (Class Scyphozoa) are common bloom-formers in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). Aurelia have a multi-modal life cycle where the perennial polyp produces seasonal medusae. Abiotic tolerance ranges and lim...
Article
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Medusae of Turritopsis dohrnii undergo reverse development in response to physical damage, adverse environmental conditions, or aging. Senescent, weakened or damaged medusae transform into a cluster of poorly differentiated cells (known as the cyst stage), which metamorphose back into a preceding life cycle stage, the polyp. During the metamorphosi...
Article
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Hydrozoa medusae undergo blooms and seasonal fluctuations; however the drivers of such fluctuations are unknown. To understand how medusa populations fluctuate in response to seasonal factors such as temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and chlorophyll a, and to enhance our taxonomic knowledge of Hydrozoa in Galveston Bay (TX), we performed fre...
Article
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This work is the first attempt to assess the biodiversity of the Hydrozoa in the Archipiélago de Bocas del Toro (Panamá, Caribbean Sea) using morphology and molecular taxonomy, and to produce field identification tools to help future identification and monitoring efforts in the area. We sampled, identified, vouchered, and barcoded 112 specimens of...
Article
Full-text available
Using a ~ 600 bps fragment of the mitochondrial 16S gene, we reconstruct the phylogenetic history of the species complex Pennaria disticha and of the genus Turritopsis. P. disticha and, within the genus Turritopsis, Turritopsis dohrnii are considered invasive species with a very broad geographical range. We show that the invasive T. dohrnii has rea...
Article
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Background Correctly identifying organisms is key to most biological research, and is especially critical in areas of biodiversity and conservation. Yet it remains one of the greatest challenges when studying all but the few well-established model systems. The challenge is in part due to the fact that most species have yet to be described, vanishin...
Article
Turritopsis dohrnii (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa, Hydroidolina, Anthoathecata) is the only known metazoan that is capable of reversing its life cycle via morph rejuvenation from the adult medusa stage to the juvenile polyp stage. Here, we present a complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence of T. dohrnii, which harbors genes for 13 proteins, two transfer R...
Article
Full-text available
Turritopsis fascicularis Fraser, 1943 was first described off Alligator Reef, Florida, USA, at a depth of 216 m. Presumably a deep-sea species, its validity has often been questioned due to the scarcity of available records. In this paper, T. fascic-ularis is re-described from some mature colonies from the upper slope of the Gulf of Mexico. Further...
Article
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The Christmas tree hydroid Pennaria disticha is listed as one of the most common introduced species in Hawaii. Firstly reported in Kaneohe Bay (Oahu) in 1928, it is now established throughout the entire archipelago, including the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, a U.S. National Monument and World Heritage site. The Hawaiian population of P. disticha...
Article
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In his seminal book on The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants, Elton (1958) laid the foundation for the science of biological invasions. He identified the importance of human-mediated vectors as means of transporting organisms to new locations and discussed invasions in the context of ecological impacts and evolutionary consequences. Elton...
Article
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Podocoryna loyola, a new hydractiniid species, has been found on artificial substrates in Baía de Paranaguá, southern coast of Brazil, since April 2007. Its main morphological characteristics are: (1) polymorphic colonies with reticular stolons or encrusting hydrorhiza not covered by periderm and smooth chitinous spines; (2) newly-released medusae...
Article
Biased transitions are common throughout the tree of life. The class hydrozoa is no exception, having lost the feeding medusa stage at least 70 times. The family hydractiniidae includes one lineage with pelagic medusae (Podocoryna) and several without (e.g., Hydractinia). The benthic colony stage also varies widely in host specificity and in colony...
Article
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Speciation remains one of the most controversial and least understood topics in evolution. About 75% of the earth’s surface is covered by oceans. However, most of what we currently know about speciation is strongly biased toward terrestrial and freshwater organisms. Here, we discuss some of the major advances of the past two decades in our understa...
Article
At least six morphospecies of vestimentiferan tubeworms are associated with cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). The physiology and ecology of the two best-studied species from depths above 1000 m in the upper Louisiana slope (Lamellibrachia luymesi and Seepiophila jonesi) are relatively well understood. The biology of one rare species from the...
Article
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Biomineralization has mostly been studied in the class Anthozoa (Phylum Cnidaria), but very little is known about the evolution of the calcified skeleton in the class Hydrozoa or about the processes leading to its formation. The evolution of the calcified skeleton is here investigated in the hydrozoan family Hydractiniidae. A phylogenetic analysis...
Article
The Hydractiniidae are a family of globally distributed marine hydrozoans (class Hydrozoa, phylum Cnidaria). Despite being one of the most well-studied families of the Hydrozoa, their genus and species-level taxonomy is unsettled and disputed. The taxonomic difficulties of the Hydractiniidae are due to many inadequate species descriptions, a paucit...
Article
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Invasions mediated by humans have been reported from around the world, and ships’ ballast water has been recognized as the main source of marine invaders worldwide. Some invasions have dramatic economic and ecological consequences. On the other hand, many invasions especially in the marine realm, can go unnoticed. Here we identify a human mediated,...
Article
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Hydroidolina is a group of hydrozoans that includes Anthoathecata, Leptothecata and Siphonophorae. Previous phylogenetic analyses show strong support for Hydroidolina monophyly, but the relationships between and within its subgroups remain uncertain. In an effort to further clarify hydroidolinan relationships, we performed phylogenetic analyses on...
Article
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Dollo's Law, the idea that the loss of complex features in evolution is irreversible, is a popular concept in evolutionary biology. Here we review how application of recent phylogenetic methods, genomics and evo-devo approaches is changing our view of Dollo's Law and its underlying mechanisms. Phylogenetic studies have recently demonstrated cases w...
Article
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In spite of being one of the most relevant components of the biosphere, the plankton-benthos network is still poorly studied as such. This is partly due to the irregular occurrence of driving phenomena such as gelatinous plankton pulses in this realm. Gelatinous plankters rely on their life cycles and histories to exploit temporarily abundant resou...
Article
Seasonal upwelling events dominate the coastal areas of some regions of the Tropical East Pacific. The effects of upwelling on gelatinous zooplankton are largely unknown and undocumented for this or any region, although upwelling is known to shape phytoplankton dynamics. Small hydromedusae, the most widespread and diverse representatives of gelatin...
Article
Full-text available
The life cycle of a species of the genus Bougainvillia (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa), found in the southern Mediterranean Sea, Italy, is here described. Hydroid colonies produced immature medusae with two tentacles and two ocelli per bulb and four unbranched oral tentacles. The number of tentacles and ocelli, which remained constant during the entire life c...
Article
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Mitochondrial ribosomal gene sequences were used to investigate the status of several populations of hydromedusae belonging to the genus Turritopsis (family Oceaniidae). Several nominal species have been described for this genus, but most of them had been synonymized and attributed to one cosmopolitan species, Turritopsis nutricula. A recent revisi...
Article
A new partially calcified hydroid species of the family Hydractiniidae, was found in offshore waters of the Aleutian Islands (Alaska), dredged from the bottom at 139–145 m depth. This is the third known species of extant calcified Hydractiniidae, and it shows a unique colony structure. The base is heavily calcified and the distal parts are ramified...
Article
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The hydroids of Eugymnanthea inquilina and E. japonica associated with Mytilus galloprovincialis exhibit some passive but unique behaviours: no escape reactions against mechanical and light stimuli; an uncontracted body with extended tentacles with or without captured food, even when the gastric cavity is full. These behaviours may have evolved in...
Article
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The temporal and spatial distribution of hydroids (sessile fauna) and polychaetes (vagile) on the brown alga Cystoseira amentacea (Fucales: Phaeophyceae) have been studied in the mid-littoral zone of the Apulian coast (Italy). Samplings were carried out in February and July 1997, at 1.5 m depth, at three sites (Gargano, Costa Merlata and Otranto),...
Article
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The behavioural patterns of 26 species of Antho- and Leptomedusae (with or without medusa stage) were investigated by video recordings. The analysed activities were: answers to mechanical stimuli, prey capture and ingestion, digestion, egestion, and swimming. The quantity of behavioural patterns identified in the small number of hydrozoan diversity...
Article
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Codonorchis octaedrus is recorded for the first time since its discovery by Haeckel in 1879. A hydroid colony collected in a cave of the Apulian Coast (between the Ionian and the Adriatic Seas) produced several medusae which have been reared to maturity. This is the first complete description of the species, which was previously considered as doubt...

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