Maria Guelbenzu

Maria Guelbenzu
Animal Health Ireland

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (Licenciada Veterinaria) PhD MRCVS

About

45
Publications
4,257
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Citations
Introduction

Publications

Publications (45)
Article
Full-text available
Background The cattle sector is the most important economic production unit of the Irish farming and agri-food sector. Despite its relevance, there has been limited quantitative information about the structure of differing cattle production types and of the connections between them. This paper addresses this gap by providing, for the first time, an...
Article
The STOC free project constructed a generic framework that allows a standardised and harmonised description of different control programmes (CP) for cattle diseases. The STOC free model can be used to determine the confidence of freedom from infection that has been achieved in disease CPs, in support of an ongoing assessment of progress towards out...
Article
Full-text available
Countries have implemented control programmes (CPs) for cattle diseases such as bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) that are tailored to each country-specific situation. Practical methods are needed to assess the output of these CPs in terms of the confidence of freedom from infection that is achieved. As part of the STOC free project, a Bayesian H...
Article
Background A national programme to eradicate bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) has been in place in Ireland since 2013. To inform decision making in the end stages of eradication, and support the development of post-eradication surveillance strategies, an understanding of risks of infection in a low prevalence system is required. Methods A case-control...
Article
Mycoplasma bovis is a serious disease of cattle worldwide; mastitis, pneumonia, and arthritis are particularly important clinical presentations in dairy herds. Mycoplasma bovis was first identified in Ireland in 1994, and the reporting of Mycoplasma-associated disease has substantially increased over the last 5 years. Despite the presumed endemic n...
Article
Control programmes against non-regulated infectious diseases of farm animals are widely implemented. Different control programmes have different definitions of “freedom from infection” which can lead to difficulties when trading animals between countries. When a disease is still present, in order to identify herds that are safe to trade with, estim...
Article
The collective control programmes (CPs) that exist for many infectious diseases of farm animals rely on the application of diagnostic testing at regular time intervals for the identification of infected animals or herds. The diversity of these CPs complicates the trade of animals between regions or countries because the definition of freedom from i...
Article
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Understanding farmers' behavior regarding disease control is essential to successfully implement behavior change interventions that improve uptake of best practices. A literature review was conducted to identify theoretical underpinnings, analytical methodologies, and key behavioral determinants that have been described to understand farmers' behav...
Article
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Bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) is an important endemic disease of cattle. In Ireland, an industry-led compulsory eradication programme began in January 2013. The main elements of this programme are the identification and elimination of persistently infected (PI) calves by testing all new-borns, the implementation of biosecurity to prevent re-introduc...
Article
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Agriculture is an important production sector in Albania that makes a significant contribution to the gross domestic product (GDP) and employment. The livestock sector contributes more than half of the agricultural GDP. The Albanian cattle population represents 50% of the total livestock units and accounts for 85% of the national milk production, t...
Article
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Some European countries have successfully implemented country-specific control programs (CPs) for infectious cattle diseases that are not regulated or are regulated only to a limited extent at the European Union (EU) level. Examples of such diseases include bovine viral diarrhea (BVD), infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR), and Johne's disease (J...
Article
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The COST action “Standardising output-based surveillance to control non-regulated diseases of cattle in the European Union (SOUND control),” aims to harmonise the results of surveillance and control programmes (CPs) for non-EU regulated cattle diseases to facilitate safe trade and improve overall control of cattle infectious diseases. In this paper...
Article
Full-text available
A mandatory national Irish bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) eradication programme, coordinated by Animal Health Ireland, commenced in 2013. Key decisions and programme review are undertaken by a cross-industry Implementation Group (BVDIG) supported by a Technical Working Group. Ear notch tissue is collected from all new-born calves using modified offic...
Article
We present a new modelling framework to address the evaluation of national control/surveillance programs planned in line with the European Animal Health Law (AHL) for livestock diseases. Our modelling framework is applied to the cattle sector in Ireland where there is need for policy support to design an optimal programme to achieve bovine herpesvi...
Article
Full-text available
Various European Member States have implemented control or eradication programmes for endemic infectious diseases in cattle. The design of these programmes varies between countries and therefore comparison of the outputs of different control programmes is complex. Although output-based methods to estimate the confidence of freedom resulting from th...
Article
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A detailed understanding of herd types is needed for animal disease control and surveillance activities, to inform epidemiological study design and interpretation, and to guide effective policy decision-making. In this paper, we present a new approach to classify herd types in livestock systems by combining expert knowledge and a machine-learning a...
Research
Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) and border disease virus (BDV) can cause significant health problems in ruminants and economic impacts for farmers. The aim of this study was to evaluate pestivirus exposure in Northern Ireland sheep and goat flocks, and to compare findings with a previous study from the region. Up to 20 animals were sampled fro...
Article
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Many studies report age as a risk factor for BoHV-1 infection or seropositivity. However, it is unclear whether this pattern reflects true epidemiological causation or is a consequence of study design and other issues. Here, we seek to understand the age-related dynamics of BoHV-1 seroprevalence in seasonal calving Irish dairy herds and provide dec...
Preprint
Full-text available
For many infectious diseases of farm animals, there exist collective control programmes (CPs) that rely on the application of diagnostic testing at regular time intervals for the identification of infected animals or herds. The diversity of these CPs complicates the trade of animals between regions or countries because the definition of freedom fro...
Article
Full-text available
Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is endemic in many parts of the world, and multiple countries have implemented surveillance activities for disease control or eradication. In such control programs, the disease-free status can be compromised by factors that pose risks for introduction or persistence of the virus. The aim of the present study was t...
Article
Full-text available
A compulsory national BVD eradication programme commenced in Ireland in 2013. Since then considerable progress has been made, with the animal-level prevalence of calves born persistently infected (PI) falling from 0.67 % in 2013 to 0.06 % in 2018. The herd-level prevalence fell from 11.3 % in 2013 to 1.1 % in 2018. In the Irish programme, herds in...
Article
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Background In the EU, salmonellosis is the second most commonly reported zoonosis. This pattern is reflected in Northern Ireland. Historically, foodborne salmonellosis has largely been attributed to the consumption of poultry products, and as such a number of legislative measures have been introduced by the EC. These policies focus mainly on five t...
Article
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Clostridium (Clostridioides) difficile is a Gram positive, spore forming anaerobic bacterium that is a leading cause of antibiotic associated diarrhoea in the developed world. C. difficile is a genetically diverse species that can be divided into 8 phylogenetically distinct clades with clade 5 found to be genetically distant from all others. Isolat...
Article
Influenza D is a newly described virus of cattle, pigs and small ruminants first detected in North America during 2011. Cattle have been shown to be the main viral reservoir and mounting evidence indicates that infection with influenza D may contribute to the development of bovine respiratory disease. The virus has been detected across the USA, Eur...
Article
Co-infection of tuberculosis (TB) and helminths is recognised as a significant problem in regions where such pathogens are endemic and chronic cases exist. Co-infection can modulate the immune system leading to interference with diagnostic tests, increased pathological impacts, and pathogen persistence. However, research has found that such interac...
Article
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Background Bovine tuberculosis (bTB; Mycobacterium bovis) remains a significant problem in a number of countries, and is often found where M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is also present. In the United Kingdom, bTB has been difficult to eradicate despite long-term efforts. Co-infection has been proposed as one partial mechanism thwarting era...
Article
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Bovine fasciolosis, caused by the infection of the trematode parasite Fasciola hepatica, remains a problem in dairy herds causing significant production losses. In this study, bulk milk tank samples were utilised to generate a comprehensive survey of the variation in liver fluke exposure over the four seasons of 2016 in Northern Ireland (NI). Sampl...
Article
Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) causes bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD), which is a contagious pathogen that can have a significant economic impact on cattle industries. In Northern Ireland (NI), the compulsory phase of a BVD eradication programme was implemented in 2016. The aim of this retrospective population based study was to utilize herd-leve...
Article
Surveillance and management of livestock diseases is often evaluated with reference to expected sector-wide costs. In contrast, we calculate losses or savings for individual herd owners of a change in monitoring strategy during a national cattle disease eradication programme: bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) in Ireland. The alternative strategy differs...
Article
Correctly identifying bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in cattle remains a significant problem in endemic countries. We hypothesized that animal characteristics (sex, age, breed), histories (herd effects, testing, movement) and potential exposure to other pathogens (co-infection; BVDV, liver fluke and Mycobacterium avium reactors) could significantly impa...
Article
Full-text available
Background Bovine tuberculosis (bTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis, remains a significant problem for livestock industries in many countries worldwide including Northern Ireland, where a test and slaughter regime has utilised the Single Intradermal Comparative Cervical Tuberculin (SICCT) test since 1959. We investigated the variation in post-mor...
Article
Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is a significant pathogen of cattle, leading to severe economic and animal-welfare impacts. Furthermore, the pathogen has been associated with impacting the progression or spread of other pathogens (e.g. Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis (bTB)). During this study we investigated (i)...
Article
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) limits the effectiveness of disease treatment for human and animals (WHO 2015). Food-producing animals (FPAs) can act as a reservoir of resistant zoonotic bacteria (Smith 1969, Shooter and others 1970, Levy and others 1976, Bertrand and others 2006, Skockova and others 2015). Commensal Escherichia coli are part of th...
Article
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Background The genus pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae includes bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) types 1 and 2, border disease virus (BDV) and classical swine fever virus. The two recognised genotypes of BVDV are divided into subtypes based on phylogenetic analysis, namely a-p for BVDV-1 and a-c for BVDV-2. Methods Three studies were co...
Article
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Background Liver fluke (Fasciola hepatica) is a widespread parasite of ruminants which can have significant economic impact on cattle production. Fluke infection status at the animal-level is captured during meat inspection of all animals processed for human consumption within Northern Ireland. These national datasets have not been analysed to asse...
Article
The increasing number of reports of livestock-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) world-wide attests to the public health concern surrounding this pathogen in animal husbandry and in-contact humans. In Europe, LA-MRSA CC398 is predominant and generally regarded as being of low virulence for animals. Herein we report the...
Article
Full-text available
Background Infections with bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) and bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) virus cause diseases of cattle with a worldwide distribution. The primary objective of the present study was to describe aspects of herd-level BoHV-1 and BVDV seroprevalence (based on testing of pooled sera) and control on farms in Northern Ireland, including...
Article
Full-text available
The initial incursion of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza A virus (pH1N1) into a European pig population is reported. Diagnosis of swine influenza caused by pandemic virus was made during September 2009 following routine submission of samples for differential diagnosis of causative agents of respiratory disease, including influenza A virus. All four...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
SOUND-control aims to harmonise the outputs from different European Member States Control Programmes (CPs) for non-regulated cattle diseases. This will allow a comparison between health statuses between different regions and also a comparison of the effectiveness of different CPs, both from the epidemiological and economic perspective. We aim to combine knowledge form a multidisciplinary team of researchers, industry and stakeholders and disseminate the knowledge that is available through each of the collaborating partners and the knowledge achieved during the Action. SOUND-control will establish long-term collaborations and lay the scientific basis for policies aimed at improving the safety of intra-community trade in cattle.
Project
Original research, reviews and opinions on bovine tuberculosis control, eradication, risk factors etc