Maria P. Dias

Maria P. Dias
University of Lisbon | UL · Departamento de Biologia Animal

PhD
Assistant Professor, University of Lisbon

About

118
Publications
45,717
Reads
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3,027
Citations
Introduction
Maria P. Dias is assistant professor at University of Lisbon. Maria does research in ecology and conservation of birds and is involved in several projects related to the study and conservation of migratory birds using tracking data.
Additional affiliations
April 2013 - June 2017
BirdLife International
Position
  • Analyst
March 2009 - April 2013
ISPA Instituto Universitário
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (118)
Article
The conservation of long‐distance migratory birds requires coordination between the multiple countries connected by the movements of these species. The recent expansion of tracking studies is shedding new light on these movements, but much of this information is fragmented and inaccessible to conservation practitioners and policy decision‐makers. H...
Article
To increase the probability of detecting odour plumes, and so increase prey capture success, when winds are stable central place foraging seabirds should fly crosswind to maximize the round-trip distance covered. At present, however, there is no empirical evidence of this theoretical prediction. Here, using an extensive GPS tracking dataset, we inv...
Article
Full-text available
The biodiversity of marine and coastal habitats is experiencing unprecedented change. While there are well-known drivers of these changes, such as overexploitation, climate change and pollution, there are also relatively unknown emerging issues that are poorly understood or recognized that have potentially positive or negative impacts on marine and...
Article
There are growing pressures on marine biodiversity. Seabirds in particular are one the most‐threatened groups. The black‐vented shearwater (Puffinus opisthomelas) is endemic to Mexican islands and the only shearwater living its entire life cycle in the California Current System, one of the most productive large marine ecosystems in the world. Marin...
Article
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An increasing number of species are facing unprecedented levels of threat to their long‐term survival due to the direct and indirect impacts of climate change. Key opportunities for science to inform wildlife management are linked to increasing our understanding of how changes in climatic conditions will impact species, as well as whether, and how,...
Article
Full-text available
Advances in biologging techniques and the availability of high‐resolution fisheries data have improved our ability to understand the interactions between seabirds and fisheries and to evaluate mortality risk due to bycatch. However, it remains unclear whether movement patterns and behaviour differ between birds foraging naturally or scavenging behi...
Article
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The Anthropocene is characterized by unparalleled human impact on other species, potentially ushering in the sixth mass extinction. Yet mitigation efforts remain hampered by limited information on the spatial patterns and intensity of the threats driving global biodiversity loss. Here we use expert-derived information from the International Union f...
Article
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Every year, billions of birds undertake extensive migrations between breeding and non-breeding areas, facing challenges that require behavioural adjustments, particularly to flight timing and duration. Such adjustments in daily activity patterns and the influence of extrinsic factors (e.g., environmental conditions, moonlight) have received much mo...
Presentation
Full-text available
In colonial seabirds, ecological divergence may occur in the absence of physical barriers, driven by the isolation of populations due to distance, or the adaptation to local environment. In migratory seabirds, the geographic segregation among breeding populations can persist year round (i.e., strong migratory connectivity) when populations breeding...
Article
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Identifying important sites for biodiversity is vital for conservation and management. However, there is a lack of accessible, easily‐applied tools that enable practitioners to delineate important sites for highly mobile species using established criteria. We introduce the R package ‘track2KBA’, a tool to identify important sites at the population...
Article
Biologging technology is rapidly advancing – scientists are obtaining data on movement and behaviour for a range of species, more accurately than ever before. With this information, it is possible to understand more about important areas and their connections across the open ocean including the High Seas, beyond national jurisdictions. But an absen...
Article
Full-text available
The conservation of migratory marine species, including pelagic seabirds, is challenging because their movements span vast distances frequently beyond national jurisdictions. Here, we aim to identify important aggregations of seabirds in the North Atlantic to inform ongoing regional conservation efforts. Using tracking, phenology, and population da...
Article
The increasing pressure of anthropogenic development in areas with high natural value poses a huge challenge for wildlife conservation worldwide. The Tagus estuary in southern Portugal is among the most important wetlands for migratory shorebirds in the East Atlantic Flyway (EAF). However, in 2020 the Portuguese government approved the construction...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Seabirds are amongst the most threatened birds in the world (Dias et al. 2019). Albatrosses and petrels are particularly vulnerable as they are long-lived, have a delayed sexual maturity, and low annual reproductive output. They have a wide at-sea distribution, occurring across all oceans and adjacent coastlines and islands. These extensive ranges...
Article
Full-text available
Migratory marine species cross political borders and enter the high seas, where the lack of an effective global management framework for biodiversity leaves them vulnerable to threats. Here, we combine 10,108 tracks from 5775 individual birds at 87 sites with data on breeding population sizes to estimate the relative year-round importance of nation...
Article
Full-text available
Global targets for area-based conservation and management must move beyond threshold-based targets alone and must account for the quality of such areas. In the Southern Ocean around Antarctica, a region where key biodiversity faces unprecedented risks from climate change and where there is a growing demand to extract resources, a number of marine a...
Article
Full-text available
The designation of Marine Protected Areas has become an important approach to conserving marine ecosystems that relies on robust information on the spatial distribution of biodiversity. We used GPS tracking data to identify marine Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs) for the Endangered northern rockhopper penguin Eudyptes moseleyi within th...
Article
We present the results from our 12th annual horizon scan of issues likely to impact biological conservation in the future. From a list of 97 topics, our global panel of 25 scientists and practitioners identified the top 15 issues that we believe society may urgently need to address. These issues are either novel in the biological conservation secto...
Preprint
Antarctica marine IBA inventory: This document outlines the individual proposed marine IBA sites identified for penguins across Antarctica. Data used to delineate sites is specific to penguin species within CCAMLR MPA planning domains 1, 3, 4, 7, 8 and 9. For details regarding site delineation methods, we refer interested parties to the detailed re...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic climate change is altering the geographical distribution and regular movements of species. Highly‐mobile pelagic seabirds, such as albatrosses, are particularly threatened by human activities, such as fisheries bycatch. Predicting the impact of climate change on how these animals roam the ocean is an important step towards making info...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Marine protected areas can serve to regulate harvesting and conserve biodiversity. Within large multi‐use MPAs, it is often unclear to what degree critical sites of biodiversity are afforded protection against commercial activities. Addressing this issue is a prerequisite if we are to appropriately assess sites against conservation targets. We...
Technical Report
Full-text available
El Proyecto STRONG High Seas forma parte de la Iniciativa Internacional sobre el Clima (IKI); www. international-climate-initiative.com/en/). El Ministerio Federal de Medio Ambiente, Protección de la Naturaleza y Seguridad Nuclear (BMU) fomenta esta iniciativa en virtud de una resolución del Parlamento de la República Federal de Alemania. El Proyec...
Article
Full-text available
The identification of geographic areas where the densities of animals are highest across their annual cycles is a crucial step in conservation planning. In marine environments, however, it can be particularly difficult to map the distribution of species, and the methods used are usually biased towards adults, neglecting the distribution of other li...
Article
In this horizon scan, we highlight 15 emerging issues of potential relevance to global conservation in 2020. Seven relate to potentially extensive changes in vegetation or ecological systems. These changes are either relatively new, for example, conversion of kelp forests to simpler macroalgal systems, or may occur in the future, for example, as a...
Article
Addressing the challenge of protecting biodiversity in the global ocean requires a sound knowledge and understanding of the complex marine environment. Since 2008 the Global Ocean Biodiversity Initiative (GOBI) has been established as a voluntary dedicated group of marine institutions and scientists working to support conservation and protection of...
Article
Full-text available
The distributions of migratory species in the ocean span local, national and international jurisdictions. Across these ecologically interconnected regions, migratory marine species interact with anthropogenic stressors throughout their lives. Migratory connectivity, the geographical linking of individuals and populations throughout their migratory...
Poster
Penguins are widely regarded as sentinels of the marine environment. However, a number of species have seen rapid population declines in recent years. It is imperative to identify the threats to these species in order to determine effective conservation actions. Through a global literature review of threats to seabirds, we present the first objecti...
Presentation
For the conservation of species and biodiversity, it is imperative to identify sites that will contribute significantly to their global persistence. Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs) are a recognised conservation tool, based on global criteria, to locate such sites. Terrestrial IBAs have been identified for the four key penguin species o...
Presentation
Penguins largely rely on resources within close proximity of their breeding colonies, making them excellent indicator species for the state of local ecosystems. Additionally, their charismatic nature and economic value (through tourism) in certain regions makes them key focal species for the understanding, management and conservation of natural env...
Presentation
Marine conservation necessitates regulation of harvesting so that it does not compromise protection of species, communities and ecosystems. The UN Convention on Biological Diversity Aichi Targets 6 and 11, and UN Sustainable Development Goal 14 define key global priorities that bind nations to achieving this objective. To demonstrate this at a sign...
Presentation
The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) was created in 1982 to protect the biodiversity of the Southern Ocean. CCAMLR meets annually to make management decisions based on consensus and using the best available science. In 2011 CCAMLR became the first international body to commit to creating a network of mar...
Article
Full-text available
We present the first objective quantitative assessment of the threats to all 359 species of seabirds, identify the main challenges facing them, and outline priority actions for their conservation. We applied the standardised Threats Classification Scheme developed for the IUCN Red List to objectively assess threats to each species and analysed the...
Article
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1.The processes that drive the ontogeny of migratory strategies in long‐lived animals with slow maturation remain enigmatic. While some short‐lived migrants are known or believed to repeat the same migratory patterns throughout their lives, little is known on the time required for immature long‐lived migrants to progressively acquire adult‐like mig...
Article
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Shearwaters and petrels (hereafter petrels) are highly adapted seabirds that occur across all the world’s oceans. Petrels are a threatened seabird group comprising 124 species. They have bet-hedging life histories typified by extended chick rearing periods, low fecundity, high adult survival, strong philopatry, monogamy and long-term mate fidelity...
Article
There have been efforts around the globe to track individuals of many marine species and assess their movements and distribution, with the putative goal of supporting their conservation and management. Determining whether, and how, tracking data have been successfully applied to address real-world conservation issues is, however, difficult. Here, w...
Article
Full-text available
Tracking individual marine predators can provide vital information to aid the identification of important activity (foraging, commuting, rafting, resting, etc.) hotspots and therefore also to delineate priority sites for conservation. However, in certain locations (e.g. Antarctica) many marine mammal or seabird colonies remain untracked due to logi...
Article
Full-text available
BirdLife International´s Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBA) Programme has identified, documented and mapped over 13,000 sites of international importance for birds. IBAs have been influential with governments, multilateral agreements, businesses and others in: (1) informing governments’ efforts to expand protected area networks (in particu...
Article
Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs) are sites identified as being globally important for the conservation of bird populations on the basis of an internationally agreed set of criteria. We present the first review of the development and spread of the IBA concept since it was launched by BirdLife International (then ICBP) in 1979 and examine...
Article
Full-text available
Aim To provide a method of analyzing penguin tracking data to identify priority at‐sea areas for seabird conservation (marine IBAs), based on pre‐existing approaches for flying seabirds but revised according to the specific ecology of Pygoscelis penguin species. Location Waters around the Antarctic Peninsula, South Shetland, and South Orkney archi...
Article
Knowing the spatial scales at which effective management can be implemented is fundamental for conservation planning. This is especially important for mobile species, which can be exposed to threats across large areas, but the space use requirements of different species can vary to an extent that might render some management approaches inefficient....
Article
Full-text available
In the Southern Ocean, the at-sea distributions of most predators of Antarctic krill are poorly known, primarily because tracking studies have only been undertaken on a restricted set of species, and then only at a limited number of sites. For chinstrap penguins, one of the most abundant krill predators breeding across the Antarctic Peninsula, we s...
Article
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The Tejo estuary is a key site for wintering and migratory waterbirds both at the national and international levels. Here we report the main findings of an ongoing monitoring programme of waterbirds in the main high tide roosts of the estuary. A decade of monthly counts (between 2007 and 2016) revealed peaks in waterbird abundance occurring between...
Article
Full-text available
Demographic parameters of wild animals are often closely associated with their foraging distribution and behaviour, and understanding these attributes can assist in identifying causes of population changes. The Indian Yellow-nosed Albatross (Thalassarche carteri) is endangered but little information is available on its at-sea distribution and behav...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation policy decisions can suffer from a lack of evidence, hindering effective decision‐making. In nature conservation, studies investigating why policy is often not evidence‐informed have tended to focus on Western democracies, with relatively small samples. To understand global variation and challenges better, we established a global surve...
Article
Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) is becoming a key management approach throughout the world. The process includes the mapping of how humans and wildlife use the marine environment to inform the development of management measures. An integrated multi-species approach to identifying key areas is important for MSP because it allows managers a global repr...
Article
Full-text available
Wind conditions strongly affect migratory costs and shape flyways and detours for many birds, especially soaring birds. However, whether winds also influence individual variability in migratory choices is an unexplored question. Cory's shearwaters (Calonectris borealis) exhibit migratory flexibility, changing non-breeding destination across the Atl...
Article
The distribution of many marine organisms is still poorly understood, particularly in oceanic regions. Seabirds, as aerial predators which cover extensive areas across the oceans, can potentially be used to enhance our knowledge on the distribution and abundance of their prey. In this study, we combined tracking data and dietary data from individua...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation policy decisions can suffer from a lack of evidence, hindering effective decision-making. In nature conservation, studies investigating why policy is often not evidence-informed have tended to focus on Western democracies, with relatively small samples. To understand global variation and challenges better, we established a global surve...
Data
FIGURE S1 Flow diagram illustrating the survey methodology FIGURE S2 Ranking of barriers by role according to Human Development Index FIGURE S3 Proportion of different roles (Red: Policy position, Yellow: practitioners, Blue: Policy position) experiencing the barriers FIGURE S4 Proportion of male and female respondents to the online survey by ro...
Article
Full-text available
The lunar cycle is believed to strongly influence the vertical distribution of many oceanic taxa, with implications for the foraging behaviour of nocturnal marine predators. Most studies to date testing lunar effects on foraging have focused on predator activity at-sea, with some birds and marine mammals demonstrating contrasting behavioural patter...
Article
The European Commission has repeatedly requested its Member States to fully implement one of the world's oldest nature legislation laws, the Birds Directive, by designating Special Protection Areas (SPAs) in the marine environment. The current work analyses the spatial coverage offered by the SPA network to the 82 species of seabirds that occur in...
Article
The Convention on Biological Diversity aspires to designate 10% of the global oceans as Marine Protected Areas (MPAs), but so far, few MPAs protect pelagic species in the high seas. Transparent scientific approaches are needed to ensure that these encompass areas with high biodiversity value. Here we used the distribution of all globally threatened...