María Cioè-Peña

María Cioè-Peña
Montclair State University

Doctor of Philosophy
Free pdfs of all my work are available on my website: www.mariacioe-pena.com :-)

About

20
Publications
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93
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Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Racialized students are overrepresented in special- and English-learner education programs in the United States. Researchers have pointed to implicit bias in evaluation tools and evaluators as a cause resulting in calls for more culturally competent/relevant practices/assessments. However, this paper argues that racial overrepresentation is reflect...
Article
For decades, educational research has focused on centering the experiences of children of color. From this research arose culturally relevant pedagogies (CRPs) and culturally sustaining pedagogies (CSPs). However, as countless teachers focus on developing more inclusive classroom practices, the cultural needs of parents continue to be ignored. One...
Article
Remote schooling has increased in prevalence. Although remote schooling may feel novel, remote and online educational requirements have been consistent parts of the educational landscape for years. Remote schooling increases learning opportunities within the home, magnifying the need for home-school collaborations to support the academic and socio-...
Article
Nationally, there is a rise in students who are dually classified as emergent bilinguals and students with disabilities. While conversations around disproportionality and the over‐representation of emergent bilinguals in special education are important, that discourse does not address the needs of students currently classified. Overwhelmingly, educ...
Article
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In the primary grades, decisions regarding the language/s of instruction for emergent bilinguals labeled as disabled (EBLADs) are often made entirely by school repre-sentatives with little to no input from the child or the family. These decisions, which often result in a monolingual placement, not only impact the linguistic practices of EBLADs in s...
Article
The narratives of immigrant Latinx mothers are often excluded from discourses on motherhood. This study centers on a shared experience with Child Protective Services (CPS) for two such mothers. One mother had CPS called on her family, the other was the teacher who made the call. This paper analyses their experiences in relation to disability, docum...
Article
Inclusive education is promoted as an educational setting that brings together students with disabilities alongside non-disabled peers. As the rise in inclusive education continues, many recognize the Salamanca Statement of 1994 as an influencer. This paper discusses how the vision of inclusion grounded in “the need to work towards ‘schools for all...
Article
While access to bilingual education programs is on the rise, Emergent Bilingual Learners Labeled as Dis/abled (EBLADs) continue to experience English-mostly educational placements. Analysis of interviews with ten Latinx mothers of EBLADs revealed that educators recommended their children be placed in English-only instructional programs to avoid lin...
Conference Paper
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Paper focused on bilingual students with disabilities by discussing neurodiversity rather than special education.
Article
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At the onset of nearly every American civil rights movement there are two pivotal messages: the first is the group’s claims of exclusion from the life that the privileged lead and the second is a demand to be included. In all cases the first step in creating sustainable change has been the recognition that society was functioning on a multi-tiered...
Article
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In our current political climate, inclusion is a term that is most often used to describe a programmatic phenomenon within special education. In this setting, inclusion refers to the integration of people with dis/abilities into mainstream academic settings on the basis of social demographics or qualifiers such as age and grade level regardless of...
Article
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Bilingual education advocates believe that linguistically diverse students should have access to home language learning. Disabilities studies advocates believe that children with dis/abilities have the right to participate in mainstream education. For emergent bilingual learners labeled as disabled (EBLADs) inclusion in the mainstream often require...
Article
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Este volumen presenta los resultados de una serie de estudios de caso realizados en varios campus de la Universidad de Nueva York dentro de un proyecto patrocinado por la universidad titulado Future Initiatives (FI). FI defiende una mayor equidad y mayor innovacion en la educacion superior a traves de diversas acciones, incluyendo la investigacion...
Article
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Oral history interviews conducted with four student-Teachers in Bilingual Education or TESOL studies are analyzed. Despite being deconstructed in sociolinguistics and related fields, the 'native' and 'non-native' dichotomy emerges not only as salient in participants' self-perceptions of linguistic competence, but also in feelings of unpreparedness...
Article
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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In speaking about newcomers who are identified as English language learners, teachers can at times be heard saying that these children come to school "with nothing." What teachers mean by "nothing" can vary. The word can be used to express limited literacy or numeracy, as denied in the most orthodox fashion. However, more often th...
Article
Full-text available
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The placement of multilingual students receiving special education services has been greatly impacted by local issues such as lack of resources and changes in programmatic structures as well as more universal policy changes that have led to special education reform and a shift to a more testing focused culture. As a result, many o...

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Projects (2)
Project
Descriptive inquiry is a method of gathering student data through observation while diminishing judgment and highlighting student strengths through a collaborative process involving teachers and family members. This was a practice developed in rural Vermont in the 1960s and since then has been adopted within progressive schools. The goal of the proposed mixed methods study is to see if a process like descriptive inquiry can lead to academic growth and increased social-emotional support for children of color and students with disabilities. Additionally, can the collaborative community developed through the descriptive inquiry processes help teachers feel more supported thus leading to increased teacher satisfaction and teacher retention.