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Margot Wiesinger Smith

Margot Wiesinger Smith
Retired · Retired

21.98
 · 
Dr.P.H.
About
59
Research items
2,209
Reads
450
Citations
Research Experience
Sep 1998 - Feb 2015
I
Position
  • Activist
Jun 1986 - Sep 1998
California Department of Health Care Services
Position
  • Research Analyst
Description
  • Retired
Education
Sep 1972 - Jun 1977
Berkeley
Berkeley
Field of study
  • Social Sciences in Public Health
Projects
Projects (4)
Project
Revealing the cultural biases in IQ testing.
Research
Research items (59)
The age of the city, its years of prosperity, important architects, its years of poor economy, population changes, wealth, and its need for space, and the kind of space. (offices, industrial, residential) for starters. Look at its history.
Philosophers have long argued as to what is reality? Perhaps it is all delusion.
Interesting question. I would examine their use of herbicides / pesticides and see if they effected asthma and other ailments among nearby elderly and children. Do they have programs for children to grow food and learn about vegetables, good nutrition? (See Alice Waters and her program for children's farms at schools). How is the food distributed? do they have local crop swaps? boxes delivered to local homes? is it sold at farmer's markets? See the Ecology Center farmer's markets in Berkeley, CA. Are there communal farms? lots of possibilities....
Sure, look at Fox News.
It depends on what you want to know. See my articles on physician distribution. If you want to know cultural things, one might do a community study--interviewing people. Or counts of certain activities and their levels of attraction. What do you want to know?
Activities of daily living (ADL) activities that are necessary for daily care of oneself and independent community living. It includes using the toilet and grooming, dressing, and feeding oneself; independent community living includes driving, shopping, homemaking, care of family, work activities, and so on. See also self care, self care deficit, and self care assistance.(See accompanying table.) See medical dictionery
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Medical science has profoundly changed our lives. In the 1930s germ theory was less than 100 years old. Although people from Biblical times knew that diseases were contagious, no one knew exactly how they were spread. In 1854 there was the famous moment when John Snow stopped an epidemic of waterborne cholera in London by removing certain water pum...
Check Central Place Theory, my article on medical care regions.  In this case, we counted the number of medical specialties (services) in each city. Actually a count of all services would do. Many businesses have associations which define the array of services in their businesses, e.g.in the US, restaurant associations have various ethnic, togo, fine dining, etc. and they can be used as a measure or urbanity also.
you can count the number of services provided by the center as a measure of urban strength. e.g. restaurants, clothing stores, hospitals, clinics, govt offices, etc, each is an individual service. the more, the more urban.
the six cultures study after WWII involved collaboration.
There is probably a system of rating airports and their functions, e.g. general, international, etc so you can rank the importance of that airport and see how much traffic it will attract compared to other airports.  Then look at the nearby areas to see what commercial functions they currently have and which are dependent on the airport, e.g. trucking, warehouees, etc. commercial mail, etc. then go from there.
Behavioral sciences explains both patient behavior and physician behavior and location, especially access to care from both perspectives.  The physician works in a cultural context, and must have sensitivity to cultural differences among patients, as well as understanding his/her own beliefs and culture.
Check out central place theory.  It begins with Walter Christaller in i930.  I have papers that do regional analysis for California.
Activities of daily living (ADL) is still good.
Of course you start with the Rosenthal study that found that a teacher who mixed up locker number with IQ scores found students met her expectations.
Take a look at Alfred Binet's remarkable questions.  I compared responses to each question from nine cultures.  It shows that many questions commonly used are culturally loaded.  I would go to each culture and test long term memory, short term memory, abstraction levels, talents for math, literacy, art, science with reference to their common experiences. Perhaps you could ask teachers how they determine who is smart.
Alfred Binet's Remarkable Questions is a cross cultural analysis of the Stanford Binet IQ test, which may give you some ideas.
I took a class from him at the University of Hawaii in 1966, and we did TATs as part of our classwork. I will never forget the session where he hosted Margaret Mead in our seminar, and she scolded me for giving out too much info on my subject.  A memorable experience!!
check on the work of George de Vos--he did cross cultural TATs.
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Some Power decided that I should be off the planet for a while, so I was afflicted with a severe case of pneumonia and a lung abscess. This put me in the hospital for a couple of weeks, and after figuring out which antibiotic cocktail I needed and draining my lungs, doctors sent me to a nursing home for a month to get antibiotics intravenously.
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This article is the author’s reply to A. R. Jensen’s critique in the present issue on her paper, “Alfred Binet’s remarkable questions: A cross-national and cross-temporal analysis of the cultural biases built into the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale and other Binet tests,” which appeared in Genetic Psychology Monographs, 1974, 89, 307-334.
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When engaging seniors in community, political, social, artistic or faith-based activities, it is important to accommodate their needs. Large percentages of elders are voters. They are often religious, serve as caregivers, work as artists, go to concerts, tour historic sites, and are activists. Elders are storehouses of knowledge--they know how to w...
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http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/55383/1/Levenstein S, Psychological predictors of peptic ulcer, 1997.pdf
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http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/55319/1/Levenstein S, Sociodemographic characteristics, 1995.pdf
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Socioeconomic status is well known to be associated with inverse gradients in a wide range of health outcomes. Very little is known about the precise shape of these relationships and how they evolve through the life-course, although recent work has suggested steep non-linearities for mortality in samples of the entire population that include the ve...
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Les performances académiques et de tests psychologiques de 836 enfants mexicains-américains ont étéétudiées sur une période de quatre ans. Ces enfants, âgés de 6 à 12 ans, vivaient dans une ville rurale de Californie à prédominance Hispanique. Les moyennes des résultats sur les tests psychologiques étaient à l’intérieur d’une déviation standard des...
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Psychosocial stressors have been shown to predict hypertension in several cohort studies; patterns of importance, sex differences, and interactions with standard risk factors have not been fully characterized. Among 2357 adults in a population sample of Alameda County, California, free of hypertension in 1974, 637 reported in 1994 having ever used...
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Techniques for searching the Social Security Death Index and the National Death Index are described. About 10% of first names, 7% of surnames, 20% of dates of birth and 3% of social security numbers of subjects differed from study data on their death certificates. An intensive search of the Social Security Death Index on the Internet found 302 or 7...
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It has often been suggested that mood and personality predispose to peptic ulcer, but little prospective evidence exists. We used longitudinal data from the Alameda County Study to seek associations of psychological characteristics with later ulcer development, taking into account the possible confounding or mediating, taking into account the possi...
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In a study of access to medical care, the authors analyzed the relationship between factors influencing demand, local unmet needs, and the availability of physicians in a rural California community. The California Department of Health Services screened 1,697 (90%) of children aged 1 to 12 years in McFarland, CA. The relation of demand to unmet need...
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The role of psychosocial factors in peptic ulcer remains controversial. We have investigated the relationship between socioeconomic status, concrete stressors, and ulcers in a longitudinally followed, population-based cohort, taking confounding risk factors into account. A total of 6,928 adults completed the Alameda County Study's baseline question...
Conference Paper
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An analysis of physician location and factors influencing access to care. The values of 186 (66%) of primary care White, Hispanic and women physicians in an oversupply area were compared, whether they served the poor, and what influenced their decisions. It was apparent that the social stratification of physicians was important.
Conference Paper
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Central Place Theory was the basis for the analysis of medical care distribution in California and Illinois, and revealed referral patterns, what physicians do in areas of high competition. Central Place Theory yielded findings of interest to those calculating regional distribution of medical services, maldistribution, shortages, over-supply of phy...
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Foreign-born physicians graduated from foreign medical schools who were unlicensed in California are described by nationality, age, sex, location, visa status, employment, English fluency, and specialty. Over 1,210 unlicensed foreign medical graduates (FMGs) were located in California and 736 were interviewed, approximately 40% of the estimated 3,0...
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Foreign-bom physicians graduated from foreign medical schools who were unlicensed in California are described by nationality, age, sex, location, visa status, employment, English fluency, and specialty. Over 1,210 unlicensed foreign medical graduates (FMGs) were located in California and 736 were interviewed, approximately 40% of the estimated 3,00...
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Planners and others interested in the economics of medical care distribution often have difficulty in estimating the land area and population base served by the physicians and medical facilities located in a town or city. In the case of regional jurisdictions, the land areas of regions are often designated on the basis of political considerations,...
Conference Paper
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Physician maldistribuition and shortages continue to plague us. However, where physicians locate is influenced by economic factors--their specialty, the location of urban centers, a region's infrastructure, the population size required to support a practice, the presence or absence of other specialties and technologies, and the economic demand for...
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Rural medical care delivery in its social context, and a new method for analyzing economic factors influencing medical services distribution were addressed by the research. Issues examined were rural medical care scarcity, physician recruitment to rural communities, lower physician utilization rates, the poor health status of rural people, and prob...
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Cultural components of IQ scores were explored by examining 14 versions of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale revised for 9 countries from 1908 to 1960. Tests were altered for a population by changing wording and content, moving test questions upwards and downwards in the age scale, revising scoring to regulate the level of difficulty of an item...
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The Bogardus Social Distance Scale and a personal date sheet administered to students at the University of Hawaii, Hilo Campus yieled 356 responses--two thirds of the students. Buddhist rural males of Japanese ancestry were found to express the most predjudices. The Social Distance Scale was not a continuum for the Hilo population. Religious prefer...