Margot Cramwinckel

Margot Cramwinckel
Utrecht University | UU · Department of Earth Sciences

About

47
Publications
14,402
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738
Citations
Citations since 2016
47 Research Items
737 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200

Publications

Publications (47)
Preprint
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Earth's hydrological cycle is expected to intensify in response to global warming , with a 'wet-gets-wetter, dry-gets-drier' response anticipated. The subtrop-ics (~15-30°N/S) are predicted to become drier, yet proxy evidence from past warm climates suggests these regions may be characterised by wetter conditions. Here we use an integrated data-mod...
Article
The middle Eocene climatic optimum (ca. 40 Ma) stands out as a transient global warming phase of ∼400 k.y. duration that interrupted long-term Eocene cooling; it has been associated with a rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations that has been linked to a flare-up in Arabia-Eurasia continental arc volcanism. Increased organic carbon burial in the Tet...
Article
IODP Site U1509 (Expedition 371), New Caledonia Trough, provides a rare latest Cretaceous–Paleocene record from offshore northern Zealandia. We present new palynomorph and benthic foraminiferal assemblage data that show a transition from a latest Cretaceous vegetated sediment source region to a fully oceanic environment in the Paleocene. Latest Cre...
Article
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Terrestrial organic carbon (TerrOC) acts as an important CO2 sink when transported via rivers to the ocean and sequestered in coastal marine sediments. This mechanism might help to modulate atmospheric CO2 levels over short- and long timescales (103 to 106 years), but its importance during past warm climates remains unknown. Here we use terrestrial...
Article
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Sediment mass accumulation rate (MAR) is a proxy for paleoceanographic conditions, especially if biological productivity generated most of the sediment. We determine MAR records from pelagic calcareous sediments in Tasman Sea based on analysis of 11 boreholes and >3 million seismic reflection horizon picks. Seismic data from regions of 10,000–30,00...
Article
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Rapid onset of subduction tectonics across the western Pacific convergent margins in the early Eocene was followed by a slower phase of margin growth of the proto Tonga-Kermadec subduction system north of Zealandia during a middle Eocene phase to tectonic adjustment. We present new age constraints from International Ocean Discovery Program Expediti...
Article
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Sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions based on isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (isoGDGT) distributions from the Eocene southwest (SW) Pacific Ocean are unequivocally warmer than can be reconciled with state-of-the-art fully coupled climate models. However, the SST signal preserved in sedimentary archives can be affected by c...
Article
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Environmental and biotic responses to early Eocene hyperthermal events in the southwest Pacific are critical for global paleoclimate reconstructions during Cenozoic greenhouse intervals, but detailed multidisciplinary studies are generally missing from this time and location. Eocene carbonate sediments were recovered during International Ocean Disc...
Preprint
Full-text available
Sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions based on isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (isoGDGT) distributions from the Eocene southwest (sw) Pacific Ocean are unequivocally warmer than can be reconciled with state-of-the-art fully coupled climate models. However, the SST signal preserved in sedimentary archives can be affected by c...
Article
Full-text available
The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO), a ∼500 kyr episode of global warming that initiated at ∼ 40.5 Ma, is postulated to be driven by a net increase in volcanic carbon input, but a direct source has not been identified. Here we show, based on new and previously published radiometric ages of volcanic rocks, that the interval spanning the MECO c...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate estimates of past global mean surface temperature (GMST) help to contextualise future climate change and are required to estimate the sensitivity of the climate system to CO2 forcing through Earth's history. Previous GMST estimates for the latest Paleocene and early Eocene (∼57 to 48 million years ago) span a wide range (∼9 to 23 ∘C higher...
Article
Full-text available
Several studies indicate that North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation might have initiated during the globally warm Eocene (56–34 million years ago; Ma). However, constraints on Eocene surface ocean conditions in source regions presently conducive to deep‐water formation are sparse. Here we test whether ocean conditions of the middle Eocene Labr...
Article
Full-text available
Global climate cooled from the early Eocene hothouse (∼52–50 Ma) to the latest Eocene (∼34 Ma). At the same time, the tectonic evolution of the Southern Ocean was characterized by the opening and deepening of circum-Antarctic gateways, which affected both surface- and deep-ocean circulation. The Tasmanian Gateway played a key role in regulating oce...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract. The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO), a ~500 kyr episode of global warming that initiated at ~40.5 Ma, is postulated to be driven by a net increase in volcanic carbon input, but a direct source has not been identified. Here we show, based on new and previously published radiometric ages of volcanic rocks, that the interval spanning t...
Article
Full-text available
Data from International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 371 reveal vertical movements of 1–3 km in northern Zealandia during early Cenozoic subduction initiation in the western Pacific Ocean. Lord Howe Rise rose from deep (~1 km) water to sea level and subsided back, with peak uplift at 50 Ma in the north and between 41 and 32 Ma in the s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract. Accurate estimates of past global mean surface temperature (GMST) help to contextualise future climate change and are required to estimate the sensitivity of the climate system to CO<sub>2</sub> forcing during the geological record. GMST estimates from the latest Paleocene and early Eocene (~ 57 to 48 million years ago) span a wide range...
Article
Accurate estimates of past global mean surface temperature (GMST) help to contextualise future climate change and are required to estimate the sensitivity of the climate system to CO2 forcing during the geological record. GMST estimates from the latest Paleocene and early Eocene (~ 57 to 48 million years ago) span a wide range (~ 9 to 23 °C higher...
Preprint
Full-text available
Accurate estimates of past global mean surface temperature (GMST) help to contextualise future climate change and are required to estimate the sensitivity of the climate system to CO2 forcing during the geological record. GMST estimates from the latest Paleocene and early Eocene (~57 to 48 million years ago) span a wide range (~9 to 23°C higher tha...
Article
The sedimentary succession along the Belaya River (North Caucasus) provides a record of middle Eocene to Miocene sediments. This time interval is well known for its important climatic transitions (e.g., Middle Eocene Climate Optimum (MECO) and Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT)), and changes in basin configuration from Peri-Tethys to Paratethys. The...
Article
The sedimentary succession along the Belaya River (North Caucasus) provides a record of middle Eocene to Miocene sediments. This time interval is well known for its important climatic transitions (e.g., Middle Eocene Climate Optimum (MECO) and Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT)), and changes in basin configuration from Peri-Tethys to Paratethys. The...
Article
Full-text available
The early Eocene (56 to 48 million years ago) is inferred to have been the most recent time that Earth's atmospheric CO2 concentrations exceeded 1000 ppm. Global mean temperatures were also substantially warmer than those of the present day. As such, the study of early Eocene climate provides insight into how a super-warm Earth system behaves and o...
Article
Full-text available
Global climate cooled from the early Eocene hothouse (~ 52–50 Ma) to the latest Eocene (~ 34 Ma). At the same time, the tectonic evolution of the Southern Ocean was characterized by the opening and deepening of circum-Antarctic gateways, which affected both surface- and deep-ocean circulation. The Tasman Gateway played a key role in regulating ocea...
Article
Full-text available
New palynological, sedimentological, and geochemical records spanning the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO; ca. 40 Ma) in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean indicate that peak warming was associated with upper-ocean stratification, decreased export production, and possibly harmful algal blooms, followed by slight oxygen minimum zone expansion. Combi...
Preprint
Full-text available
The early Eocene (56 to 48 million years ago) is inferred to have been the most recent time that Earth's atmospheric CO2 concentrations exceeded 1000 ppm. Global mean temperatures were also substantially warmer than present day. As such, study of early Eocene climate provides insight into how a super-warm Earth system behaves and offers an opportun...
Article
Full-text available
Cenozoic stable carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope ratios of deep-sea foraminiferal calcite co-vary with the 405 kyr eccentricity cycle, suggesting a link between orbital forcing, the climate system, and the carbon cycle. Variations in δ18O are partly forced by ice-volume changes that have mostly occurred since the Oligocene. The cyclic δ13C–δ...
Article
Full-text available
The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) represents a ~500-kyr period of global warming ~40 million years ago and is associated with a rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations , but the cause of this CO2 rise remains enigmatic. Here we show, based on osmium isotope ratios (187Os/ 188Os) of marine sediments and published records of the carbonate comp...
Article
Full-text available
Palaeoclimate reconstructions of periods with warm climates and high atmospheric CO2 concentrations are crucial for developing better projections of future climate change. Deep-ocean1,2 and high-latitude3 palaeotemperature proxies demonstrate that the Eocene epoch (56 to 34 million years ago) encompasses the warmest interval of the past 66 million...
Article
Full-text available
Cenozoic stable carbon (δ¹³C) and oxygen (δ¹⁸O) isotope ratios of deep-sea foraminiferal calcite co-vary with the 405 kyr eccentricity cycle, suggesting a link between orbital forcing, the climate system, and the carbon cycle. Variations in δ¹⁸O are partly forced by ice-volume changes that have mostly occurred since the Oligocene. The cyclic δ¹³C–δ...
Article
Full-text available
International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 371 drilled six sites in the Tasman Sea of the southwest Pacific between 27 July and 26 September 2017. The primary goal was to understand Tonga-Kermadec subduction initiation through recovery of Paleogene sediment records. Secondary goals involved understanding regional oceanography and clima...
Article
Full-text available
International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 371 drilled six sites in the Tasman Sea of the southwest Pacific between 27 July and 26 September 2017. The primary goal was to understand Tonga-Kermadec subduction initiation through recovery of Paleogene sediment records. Secondary goals involved understanding regional oceanography and clima...
Article
Full-text available
Significance The Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) was a period of global warming associated with rapid massive ¹³ C-depleted carbon input, often mentioned as a paleoanalog for future climate change and associated feedbacks. One hypothesized carbon source is intrusive volcanism in the North Atlantic region, but rigid dating lacks. We date the...

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