Margarita Curras-Collazo

Margarita Curras-Collazo
University of California, Riverside | UCR · Molecular, Cell and Systems Biology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

79
Publications
3,112
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1,218
Citations
Citations since 2017
26 Research Items
341 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080

Publications

Publications (79)
Preprint
Full-text available
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are commercially used as indoor flame retardants that penetrate biota and bioaccumulate in human tissues, including breast milk. PBDEs have been associated with endocrine disruption, diabetes and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in humans and animals. However, their sex-specific diabetogenic effects are not completel...
Article
Full-text available
The Allan-Herndon Dudley Syndrome (AHDS) is a rare disease caused by the progressive loss of monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8). In patients with AHDS, the absence of MCT8 impairs transport of thyroid hormones (TH) through the blood brain barrier, leading to a central state of TH deficiency. In mice, the AHDS is mimicked by simultaneous deletion...
Article
Full-text available
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of flame-retardant organohalogen pollutants that act as endocrine/neuroendocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). In humans, exposure to brominated flame retardants (BFR) or other environmentally persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and novel organophosphate fla...
Article
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that are widely used flame retardants added to common household products. In humans, PBDEs are associated with neurodevelopmental deficits including ones associated with social competence and learning. We have previously shown that PBDE-exposed F1 female progeny displa...
Article
Full-text available
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) that are known neuroendocrine disrupting chemicals with adverse neurodevelopmental effects. PBDEs may act as risk factors for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), characterized by abnormal psychosocial functioning, although direct evidence is currently lacking. U...
Chapter
Full-text available
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and polychlorinated dibenzofurans belong to a group of compounds that are structurally related and are environmentally and biologically persistent. These chemicals have a tendency to bioaccumulate and biomagnify in the food chain. Residues of these chemic...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter covers both developmental and reproductive effects of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) with emphasis on polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). BFRs belong to a large group of organohalogen chemicals. They are highly persistent, bioaccumulative, and cause adverse effects in humans and wildlife. Although some BFRs are banned or volunt...
Article
Full-text available
Aims To characterize neuroinflammatory and gut dysbiosis signatures that accompany exaggerated exercise fatigue and cognitive/mood deficits in a mouse model of Gulf War Illness (GWI). Methods Adult male C57Bl/6 N mice were exposed for 28 d (5 d/wk) to pyridostigmine bromide (P.O.) at 6.5 mg/kg/d, b.i.d. (GW1) or 8.7 mg/kg/d, q.d. (GW2); topical pe...
Article
Full-text available
Aims To characterize exercise fatigue, metabolic phenotype and cognitive and mood deficits correlated with brain neuroinflammatory and gut microbiome changes in a chronic GWI mouse model. Main methods Adult male C57Bl/6N mice were exposed for 28 days (5 days/week) to pyridostigmine bromide: 6.5 mg/kg/day, b.i.d., P.O. (GW1) or 8.7 mg/kg/day, q.d.,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) that are known neuroendocrine disrupting chemicals with adverse neurodevelopmental effects. PBDEs may act as risk factors for autism spectrum disorders (ASD), characterized by abnormal psychosocial functioning, although direct evidence is currently lacking. U...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are brominated flame retardant chemicals and environmental contaminants with endocrine-disrupting properties that are associated with diabetes and metabolic syndrome in humans. However, their diabetogenic actions are not completely characterized or understood. In this study, we investigated the effect...
Preprint
Full-text available
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are brominated flame retardant chemicals and environmental contaminants with endocrine-disrupting properties that are associated with diabetes and metabolic syndrome in humans. However, their diabetogenic actions are not completely characterized or understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of DE-7...
Article
Full-text available
UCNeuro, a University of California, Riverside student-run organization, developed, implemented, and tested a school-based supplemental science intervention. The purpose of this intervention was to improve students' neuroscience knowledge and education attitudes and meet, in part, California's new elementary science education standards. The interve...
Article
Full-text available
Soybean oil consumption has increased greatly in the past half-century and is linked to obesity and diabetes. To test the hypothesis that soybean oil diet alters hypothalamic gene expression in conjunction with metabolic phenotype, we performed RNA-seq analysis using male mice fed isocaloric, high-fat diets based on conventional soybean oil (high i...
Article
Full-text available
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are indoor flame retardant pollutants that produce adverse neurobehavioral effects likely due to endocrine disrupting and neurotoxicological actions. In humans, PBDEs are associated with impairments in executive function, psychomotor and mental development, hyperactivity, poorer attention and in some cases soc...
Article
Soybean oil is a major component of the American diet and its increased consumption correlates positively with the prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the U.S. Our previous findings showed that a high fat diet (HFD) enriched in soybean oil, similar to the American diet, induces more obesity, diabetes, insulin resistance and fatty liver in male mi...
Chapter
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) belong to a group of compounds that are structurally related and are biologically and environmentally persistent. These chemicals can bioaccumulate and biomagnify in the food chain. Exposure to the...
Chapter
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and polychlorinated dibenzofurans belong to a group of compounds that are structurally related and are environmentally and biologically persistent. These chemicals are ubiquitous and detectable in a variety of environmental media and biota. Exposure to th...
Article
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are environmental pollutants that produce neurotoxicity and neuroendocrine disruption. They affect the vasopressinergic system but their disruptive mechanisms are not well understood. Our group reported that rats perinatally exposed to Aroclor-1254 (A1254) and DE-71 (commer...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop a method for applying calibrated manual massage pressures by using commonly available, inexpensive sphygmomanometer parts and validate the use of this approach as a quantitative method of applying massage therapy to rodents. Methods: Massage pressures were monitored by using a modified neonatal...
Article
Full-text available
Stimulated vasopressin (VP) release from magnocellular neuroendocrine cells in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) of hyperosmotic rats is inhibited by treatment with the industrial polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture, Aroclor 1254. Because VP responses to hyperosmotic stimulation are regulated by nitric oxide (NO) signaling, we studied NO synthase (NO...
Article
Full-text available
Cigarette smoking remains a significant health threat for smokers and nonsmokers alike. Secondhand smoke (SHS) is intrinsically more toxic than directly inhaled smoke. Recently, a new threat has been discovered - Thirdhand smoke (THS) - the accumulation of SHS on surfaces that ages with time, becoming progressively more toxic. THS is a potential he...
Conference Paper
Bisphenol-A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor compound (EDC), is found in many polycarbonate plastics, food/beverage containers, and cigarette smoke filters and has been proposed to be a potential risk to public health. BPA is one of the world’s highest-production volume chemicals. Studies on EDCs have primarily focused on the reproductive and thyroid...
Article
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and the structurally similar chemicals polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) disrupt the function of multiple endocrine systems. PCBs and PBDEs disrupt the secretion of vasopressin (VP) from the hypothalamus during osmotic activation. Since the peripheral and central vasopressinergic axes are critical for osmotic a...
Article
Full-text available
Organohalogen compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) are global environmental pollutants and highly persistent, bioaccumulative chemicals that produce adverse effects in humans and wildlife. Because of the widespread use of these organohalogens in household items and consumer products, indoor con...
Article
Organohalogen compounds are global environmental pollutants. They are highly persistent, bioaccumulative, and cause adverse effects in humans and wildlife. Because of the widespread use of these organohalogens in household items and consumer products, indoor contamination may be a significant source of human exposure, especially for children. One s...
Article
Flavin-containing monooxigenases (FMOs) are a polymorphic family of drug and pesticide metabolizing enzymes, found in the smooth endoplasmatic reticulum that catalyze the oxidation of soft nucleophilic heteroatom substances to their respective oxides. Previous studies in euryhaline fishes have indicated induction of FMO expression and activity in v...
Article
Domoic acid (DOM) is known to cause hippocampal neuronal damage and produces amnesic effects. We examined synaptic plasticity changes induced by DOM exposure in rat hippocampal CA1 region. Brief bath application of DOM to hippocampal slices produces a chemical form of long-term potentiation (LTP) of CA1 field synaptic potentials. The potentiation c...
Article
Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used as additive flame-retardants and have been detected in human blood, adipose tissue, and breast milk. Developmental and long-term exposures to these chemicals may pose a human health risk, especially to children. We have previously demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which are st...
Article
Full-text available
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in the assessment of the severity and progression of neurotrauma. We evaluated temporal and regional changes after mild fluid percussion (FPI) and controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury using T2-weighted-imaging (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) MRI over 7 days. Region of interest ana...
Article
The neuropeptide, vasopressin (VP) is synthesized in magnocellular neuroendocrine cells (MNCs) located within the supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei of the mammalian hypothalamus. VP has multiple functions including maintenance of body fluid homeostasis, cardiovascular control, learning and memory, and nervous system development. Pol...
Article
Magnocellular neuroendocrine cells of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) release vasopressin (VP) systemically and locally during osmotic challenge. Although both central VP and nitric oxide (NO) release appear to reduce osmotically stimulated systemic VP release, it is unknown whether they interact locally in the SON to enhance somatodendritic release o...
Article
The phytoplankton-derived neurotoxin, domoic acid (DOM), frequently causes poisoning of marine animals and poses an increasing threat to public health through contamination of seafood. In this study, we used stereotactic microinjection technique to administer varying amounts of DOM into the hippocampal CA1 region in order to examine potential histo...
Article
Full-text available
Central release of vasopressin (VP) by the magnocellular neuroendocrine cells (MNCs) responsible for systemic VP release is believed to be important in modulating the activity of these neurons during dehydration. Central VP release from MNC somata and dendrites is stimulated by both dehydration and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide...
Article
The increasing occurrence of poisoning accidents in marine animals caused by the amnesic shellfish toxin, domoic acid (DOM), necessitates a better understanding of the factors contributing to DOM neurotoxicity. Here we evaluated the contribution and temporal involvement of NMDA, non-NMDA- and metabotropic-type glutamate receptors (GluRs) in DOM-ind...
Article
Central vasopressin (VP) release from magnocellular neuroendocrine cells (MNCs) in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) occurs from their somata and dendrites within the SON several hours after acute dehydration, and is an important autoregulatory mechanism influencing the systemic release of VP from MNC terminals in the posterior pituitary. To begin to ex...
Article
Full-text available
After the discovery of the hypophysiotropic hypothalamic, factors such as the luteinizing hormone releasing factor, thyrotropin hormone, growth hormone and corticotropin, the releasing factors for the follicle stimulating hormone and that of prolactin were characterized. However, some studies showed that few new cells in adenohypophysis would presu...
Article
Full-text available
Oxytocin and vasopressin reduce the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic responses in magnocellular neuroendocrine cells of the supraoptic nucleus (SON). To test whether synaptic glutamate release is modulated by these neuropeptides, we examined the combined effect of vasopressin and oxytocin on depolarization-induced glutamate and aspartate releas...
Article
Full-text available
Intraparenchymal injections of glutamate analogues into the diencephalon near the supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus selectively spare magnocellular neuroendocrine cells. In this study we investigated for the first time the susceptibility of this neuronal population to ischemia. Temporary focal ischemia was produ...
Article
Magnocellular neuroendocrine cells (MNCs) of the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SON) produce and release the hormones vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT) in response to a variety of stimuli to regulate body water and salt, parturition and lactation. Hormone release is influenced by the pattern of neuronal firing of these MNCs, which, in tur...
Article
Full-text available
Glutamate (Glu), a major excitatory neurotransmitter within the hypothalamus and thalamus, acts upon many receptors, including the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype. Abundant evidence suggests that variations in the subunit composition of NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) contribute to differences in Glu's immediate electrophysiological effects as well as...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies suggest that activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors facilitates phasic firing and spike clustering displayed by magnocellular neuroendocrine cells (MNCs) of the supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). Osmotic stimulation produces similar activity patterns which, in turn, can lead to enha...
Article
Full-text available
Glutamate (Glu), a major excitatory neurotransmitter within the hypothalamus and thalamus, acts upon many receptors, including the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype. Abundant evidence suggests that variations in the subunit composition of NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) contribute to differences in Glu's immediate electrophysiological effects as well as...
Article
Full-text available
NMDA receptor activation produces a characteristic pattern of neuronal firing in magnocellular neuroendocrine cells (MNCs) of the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SON) which has been associated with greater hormone release in vivo and in vitro. In addition, i.c.v. administered NMDA receptor blockers suppress the dehydration-induced rise in p...
Article
Full-text available
To provide a simple means to isolate and study the cellular functions of small groups of neurons, we developed a modified 'punch' culture procedure that facilitates acute and long-term in vitro physiological studies. Primary 'punch' cultures of magnocellular neuroendocrine cells (MNCs) from the supraoptic nucleus (SON) were established and the basi...
Article
Full-text available
Cells within the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) are important in eating control. Glutamate or its analogs, kainic acid (KA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), elicit intense eating when microinjected there, and, conversely, LHA-administered NMDA receptor antagonists suppress deprivation- and NMDA-elicited eating. The subunit composition of LHA NMDA...
Article
Full-text available
Vasopressin and oxytocin neuroendocrine cells within the supraoptic nucleus of the adult hypothalamus (SON) display mRNA expression for the NMDA receptor subunits, NR1 and NR2B, NR2C and NR2D. The NR2B subunit confers slow decay kinetics (relative to NR1/NR2A receptors) and high magnesium sensitivity to NMDA receptor responses--properties which may...
Article
Full-text available
Application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) to the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SON) generates clustered firing that may be important in hormone release. However, synaptically evoked EPSPs recorded from SON neurons exhibit varying contributions from NMDA receptors. We used the high resolution of single-channel recording to examine the rec...
Article
Full-text available
N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptors are thought to be involved in synaptic signaling within the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system, but the extent and nature of their involvement has not been determined. In this study, in the rat, we evaluated the effect of hyperosmotic stimulation on the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit, NR1, which confers functi...
Article
Full-text available
N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor dose-response relationships that are based on macroscopic currents suggest that NMDA and a different agonist molecule, glycine, must together activate the channel. Since single-channel recordings have a much higher resolution than whole-cell currents, they provide a highly sensitive test for the absolute require...
Article
The endogenous neurotransmitter candidates L-aspartate, L-cysteine sulfinate (CSA), L-glutamate, L-homocysteate (HCA), and the endogenously occurring analogue quinolinate were compared in terms of potency, maximal activity, and selectivity for steady state activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA [(RS)-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxa...
Article
1. Intracellular neuronal activity was recorded in rat preoptic-anterior hypothalamic tissue slices. Thirty neurones were classified as warm sensitive, cold sensitive or temperature insensitive, based on their firing rate response to temperature changes. Seventy-seven per cent of the neurones were temperature insensitive, which included both sponta...
Article
Full-text available
To determine the role of the electrogenic Na+-K+ pump in neuronal thermosensitivity, single-unit activity was recorded in rat hypothalamic tissue slices before, during, and after perfusions containing 10(-5) or 10(-6) M ouabain, a specific pump inhibitor. Most neurons were recorded in the preoptic-anterior hypothalamus. Some neurons were also teste...
Chapter
The ability to react to thermal challenges and regulate body temperature depends on the ability of the nervous system to sense temperature both in the environment and deep within the body core. The basis of the neural control of thermoregulation is the synaptic communication between peripheral and central thermal receptors. Peripheral cutaneous the...
Article
Full-text available
Después del descubrimiento de los factores hipotalámicos hipofisiotróficos, como el factor liberador de la hormona luteinizante, de la tirotrófica, de la hormona del crecimiento y de la corticotrofina, se caracterizaron los factores liberadores de la hormona folículo estimulante y de la hormona prolactina. Sin embargo, algunos estudios mostraron qu...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Dear Dr Brandenburg
With regard to your artcle entitled, "The Expression of Endotoxic Activity in the Limulus Test as Compared to Cytokine Production in Immune Cells", we were hoping to get some tips from you in handling the LAL assay.
We study the potential for leaky gut in Gulf War Illness and are trying to optimize conditions on a commercial LAL assay. Our signal to noise ratio is low except when we use blood from LPS treated mice.
This is one problem we have inspite of using pyrogen free plasticware and water. We are now needing to sample endotoxin from live mice, via tail blood. Is this possible if we clean and disinfect mouse tail first? Do you have a recommendation?
Sincerely, Margarita Curras-Collazo
Univ California, Riverside

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The aim of this study was to determine the effects of DE-79 exposure during gestation and lactation (perinatal exposure) on the AVP content and mRNA expression of the hypothalamic PVN and SON of adult rats under osmotic activation.