Margarita Briseño Jaramillo

Margarita Briseño Jaramillo
Universidad Veracruzana | UV · Instituto de Neuroetología

PhD in Biology - Animal Behaviour

About

22
Publications
3,330
Reads
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106
Citations
Citations since 2016
6 Research Items
87 Citations
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Introduction
Margarita Briseño Jaramillo currently works at the Instituto de Neuroetología, Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa. Margarita researches in Anthropological Linguistics, Marine Biology, and Ecology. Their current project is 'Social influences on vocal flexibility in primates"'.

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
The ‘social complexity hypothesis' posits that complex social systems (which entail high uncertainty) require complex communicative systems (with high vocal flexibility). In species with fission–fusion dynamics, where the fluid composition of temporary subgroups increases the uncertainty with which group members must manage their social relationshi...
Article
Full-text available
Shared habitats between humans and other animals are increasing in the twenty-first century, which may require behavioral flexibility from animal species to adjust to these new environments. We evaluated the effects of anthropogenic pressure on Geoffroy’s spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) in a low-impact tourism area. Over the course of 18 months,...
Article
Full-text available
Animal communication has long been thought to be subject to pressures and constraints associated with social relationships. However, our understanding of how the nature and quality of social relationships relates to the use and evolution of communication is limited by a lack of directly comparable methods across multiple levels of analysis. Here, w...
Article
Full-text available
“Conversation rules” such as overlap avoidance and coordinated overlap have been reported in nonhuman animals, and seem to be adaptive responses to the requirements of social life. Some species display both patterns in an apparently flexible way, but the social factors mediating their respective usage remain poorly documented. We investigated the p...
Article
Full-text available
Nonhuman primates’ vocal repertoire has shown little plasticity, with immatures producing adult-like acoustic structures. Yet, the use of different call types shows a degree of socially dependent flexibility during development. In several nonhuman primate species, group members exchange contact calls respecting a set of social and temporal rules th...
Article
Alouatta species utter the most powerful primate vocalizations in the Neotropics and are well-known for their loud and long-lasting male howling bouts. However, the diversity of acoustic structures used in these howling bouts, as well as in non-howling contexts, and the relative contribution of the different group members to the entire vocal repert...
Article
Full-text available
Social traditions based on communication signals are widespread in birds, cetaceans and humans, but surprisingly rare in nonhuman primates known for having genetically-determined vocal repertoires. This study presents the first description of a singular case of behaviour associated with calling (placing a hand in front of the mouth while vocalizing...
Conference Paper
Diurnal animals also produce sounds at night. In several roosting species, high vocal activity at the roosting site seems to be a prerequisite to sleep, suggesting a role of vocal chorusing in coordinating resting activities. Dolphins’ nocturnal vocal activity has been rarely investigated. However, this animal model is interesting because: dolphin...
Article
La reconnaissance auditive entre les membres d’un groupe est importante pour maintenir une cohésion socio-spatiale chez les espèces forestières où la visibilité dans l’habitat est limitée, mais cela peut aller au-delà du groupe chez les espèces territoriales avec la nécessité de reconnaître ses voisins. Nous avons évalué la capacité à reconnaître i...
Article
Full-text available
Recognizing individuals auditorily is of primal im-portance in maintaining socio-spatial cohesion among con-specifics within a social group as well as for regulating space use among neighbours, particularly for species dwelling in forests where visual communication is constrained. This study evaluates the capacity of black howler monkeys (Alouatta...
Article
Full-text available
Nocturnal vocal activity in dolphins is often thought to be associated with feeding activity. However, when no food resources are available dolphins spend their time for the most part resting/sleeping. While unihemispherically sleeping, dolphins mostly swim slowly and synchronously in close proximity with one or more other individuals. Although voc...
Article
Nocturnal vocal activity in dolphins is often thought to be associated with feeding activity. However, when no food resources are available dolphins spend their time for the most part resting/sleeping. While unihemispherically sleeping, dolphins mostly swim slowly and synchronously in close proximity with one or more other individuals. Although voc...
Article
Full-text available
We review four studies investigating hand preferences for grasping versus pointing to objects at several spatial positions in human infants and three species of nonhuman primates using the same experimental setup. We expected that human infants and nonhuman primates present a comparable difference in their pattern of laterality according to tasks....
Conference Paper
Diurnal animals produce sounds at night. In roosting species, high vocal activity at roosting sites may be a prerequisite to sleep, suggesting a role of chorusing in coordinating resting. In other species, vocalizations during sleep are commonly reported, which in humans correspond to dream contents. Dolphins’ nocturnal vocal activity has been rare...
Conference Paper
Delphinids are able to copy sounds from their environment that are not produced by conspecifics. So far these mimicries occur associated with the context in which they were learned. No separation between auditory memory formation and spontaneous vocal copying was observed as it is for example in songbirds. In our study we report that bottlenose dol...
Conference Paper
It is known that delphinidae can associate heard sounds with salient events/objects and mimic these sounds, mostly in the corresponding context. Thus, one can wonder whether dolphins, as other animals and humans, have a sort of sensory memory of events. Here we show that a group of five bottlenose dolphins in the Planète Sauvage dolphinarium (Franc...
Article
Full-text available
Alban Lemasson and Martine Hausberger have contributed equally to this work. The mechanisms underlying vocal mimicry in animals remain an open question. Delphinidae are able to copy sounds from their environment that are not produced by conspecifics. Usually, these mimicries occur associated with the context in which they were learned. No reports a...
Article
Full-text available
The mechanisms underlying vocal mimicry in animals remain an open question. Delphinidae are able to copy sounds from their environment that are not produced by conspecifics. Usually, these mimicries occur associated with the context in which they were learned. No reports address the question of separation between auditory memory formation and spont...
Data
Example 2 of a Planète Sauvage dolphins’ WLP slowed down (factor of 0.5).
Data
Example 1 of a Planète Sauvage dolphins’ WLP (“whale-like” production).
Data
Example 1 of a Planète Sauvage dolphins’ WLP slowed down (factor of 0.5).

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