Margaret Webb

Margaret Webb
University of Melbourne | MSD · Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

18
Publications
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276
Citations

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
The present study used Systems Factorial Technology (Townsend & Nozawa, 1995) to investigate how people combine dual cues in semantic memory search. Our aims were (a) to understand how cues interact during the process of semantic search in convergent thinking and (b) to determine how workload capacity (i.e. cue-processing efficiency) is related to...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Many traditional measures of creativity require time-intensive and subjective scoring procedures. Their scores are relative to the specific sample, which makes multicultural or international assessments difficult. Our results show that a shorter and simpler task with automatic and objective scoring may be at least as reliable at measur...
Article
Full-text available
The current paper investigates the individual differences underlying the ability to solve classic and contemporary insight problems along the subjective phenomenology of insight in the solution of these problems. We investigate fluid reasoning, divergent thinking and schizotypy. Experiments 1–3 (total N = 434) investigated the association between s...
Preprint
Several theories posit that creative people are able to generate more divergent ideas. If this is correct, the simple act of naming unrelated words and then measuring the semantic distance between them could serve as an objective measure of creativity. To test this hypothesis, we asked 8,892 participants to name 10 words that are as different from...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Problem solving can be understood as a very active learning strategy which is also being employed in education, even though the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood (Loyens, Kirschner, & Paas, 2012). Insight in problem solving is often heralded as a moment of blinding understanding which generates a great deal of motivation (Liljedahl, 2005)....
Preprint
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Perhaps it is no accident that “Eureka” moments accompany some of humanity’s most important discoveries in science, medicine, and art. Ideas often appear unexpectedly in the human mind, so we must possess some capacity for appraising the idea in order to use it efficiently. Here we describe an account where the feeling of insight plays this adaptiv...
Article
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Danek and Salvi (The Journal of Creative Behavior, 1–3, 2018) provide a sound overview of research on the relationship between feelings of aha and the accuracy of problem‐solving solutions. However, there are reasons to be cautious in concluding that a characteristic of insightful solutions is their superior accuracy. A relationship between correct...
Poster
Full-text available
Investigating individual differences in tendency to report insight is constrained by the “problem of problems”; that is, problem-solving skills (e.g., working memory) are required for problem solving, including insight problem solving. We explore the use of a divergent thinking task, in which subjective accuracy is high, as a method of exploring in...
Article
Full-text available
Insight has been investigated under the assumption that participants solve insight problems with insight processes and/or experiences. A recent trend has involved presenting participants with the solution and analysing the resultant experience as if insight has taken place. We examined self-reports of the aha experience, a defining aspect of insigh...
Article
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The term cyberspace was coined by William Gibson, who used it in his book, Neuromancer in 1989 [15]. Gibson [15, p. 128] defines cyberspace as "a consensual hallucination." Cyberspace also describes the virtual environment of the Internet [26], alongside its more whimsical portrayal as a global village [17]. The Internet has become ubiquitous, avai...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the presumed ability of insight problems to elicit the subjective feeling of insight, as well as the use of so-called insight problems to investigate this phenomenon for over 100 years, no research has collected normative data regarding the ability of insight problems to actually elicit the feeling of insight in a given individual. The work...
Presentation
There is little data regarding individual differences that are associated with the feeling of insight when people solve insight problems despite the large literature on insight problem solving. The ability to generate diverse ideas (divergent thinking) is valuable in solving creative problems (e.g., insight problems); yet, however advantageous, div...
Presentation
DeYoung et al. (2012) outline a theory in which traits within the Openness/Intellect domain form a paradoxical simplex, with the tendency to perceive patterns in noise (apophenia) and the ability to deduce meaningful solutions (intelligence) being negatively correlated but loading on Openness/Intellect. Here we investigated whether intelligence or...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to generate diverse ideas (divergent thinking) is valuable in solving creative problems (e.g., insight problems); yet, however advantageous, this ability is insufficient to solve the problem alone and requires the ability to logically deduce an assessment of correctness of each solution (convergent thinking). Positive schizotypy may hel...
Article
Full-text available
The feeling of insight in problem solving is typically associated with the sudden realization of a solution that appears obviously correct (Kounios et al., 2006). Salvi et al. (2016) found that a solution accompanied with sudden insight is more likely to be correct than a problem solved through conscious and incremental steps. However, Metcalfe (19...
Article
Full-text available
Does becoming aware of a change to a purely visual stimulus necessarily cause the observer to be able to identify or localise the change or can change detection occur in the absence of identification or localisation? Several theories of visual awareness stress that we are aware of more than just the few objects to which we attend. In particular, it...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Current research goals centre around insight, and the individual differences associated with insight (and that aha experience) in problem solving.