Margaret Archer

Margaret Archer
The University of Warwick · Department of Sociology

Professor

About

109
Publications
26,806
Reads
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13,506
Citations
Citations since 2017
26 Research Items
6021 Citations
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Introduction
PLEASE stop insulting me! Thousands of people have read my books (that you insist on calling 'articles'), well before you set up shop!
Additional affiliations
September 1967 - June 1969
University of Cambridge
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Tutoring all Christ's College men taking the Sociology Module

Publications

Publications (109)
Chapter
The well-known distinction between Social Integration and System Integration introduced by David Lockwood (Social integration and system integration. In: Zollschan GK, Hirsch HW (eds) Explorations in social change. Houghton Mifflin, Boston, 1964) is the springboard for sketching a brief, analytical history of progressive reductions in social bonds...
Book
Πολλοί κοινωνιολόγοι αυτοαποκαλούνται πια «Σχεσιακοί Κοινωνιολόγοι», αλλά εννοούν εντελώς διαφορετικά πράγµατα. Στην πλειονότητά τους, αποδέχονται µια «επίπεδη οντολογία» η οποία ασχολείται αποκλειστικά µε δυαδικές σχέσεις. Συνεπώς, δεν µπορούν να εξηγήσουν το πλαίσιο εντός του οποίου συµβαίνουν οι σχέσεις ή οι συνέπειές τους, παρά µόνο ως αθροίσµα...
Article
David Lockwood's distinction between System Integration and Social Integration is brought together with the Morphogenetic Approach (M/M) to account for the current societal fragmentation experienced globally. The generative mechanism from c. 1980 accounting for this tendency is the growing synergy developing between globalized capitalism (its profi...
Chapter
Full-text available
This introduction to the volume gives an overview of foundational issues in AI and robotics, looking into AI’s computational basis, brain–AI comparisons, and conflicting positions on AI and consciousness. AI and robotics are changing the future of society in areas such as work, education, industry, farming, and mobility, as well as services like ba...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter the case for potential Robophilia is based upon the positive properties and powers deriving from humans and AI co-working together in synergy. Hence, Archer asks ‘Can Human Beings and AI Robots be Friends?’ The need to foreground social change for structure culture and agency is being stressed. Human enhancement speeded up with medi...
Book
Full-text available
This open access book examines recent advances in how artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics have elicited widespread debate over their benefits and drawbacks for humanity. The emergent technologies have for instance implications within medicine and health care, employment, transport, manufacturing, agriculture, and armed conflict. While there h...
Article
In Culture and Agency (1988/1996, CUP), I distinguished between the ‘Cultural System' (C.S.), namely all items logged into the universal cultural archive, and ‘Socio-Cultural' (S-C) interaction, namely how we persuade others ideationally. This paper charts major changes in the C.S. since circa 1980 when a new generative mechanism developed - the sy...
Article
Full-text available
In Culture and Agency (1988/1996, CUP), I made the distinction between the ‘Cultural System’ (C.S.), that is all items logged into the universal cultural archive, and ‘Socio‐Cultural’ (S‐C) interaction, namely how we persuade others to accept our views. The two are distinct; but any adequate explanation in social science involving ‘culture’ must re...
Article
Full-text available
In this wide-ranging interview Professor Margaret Archer discusses a variety of aspects of her work, academic career and influences, beginning with the role the study of education systems played in the development of the morphostatic/morphogenetic (M/M) framework, moving on to the trilogy of works which set out her ‘SAC’, and concluding with discus...
Chapter
Full-text available
Critical Realism, the philosophy of the social sciences used here is equally applicable to all such disciplines and accords no special place to economics. In fact there has been disappointingly little take-up of it by heterodox economists (notable exceptions in Britain being Tony Lawson and Jamie Morgan). The generality with which Roy Bhaskar advan...
Article
The role of Concrete Utopias in the works of Roy Bhaskar are contrasted with the ‘Real Utopias’ of Erik Olin Wright. Critical Realism treats them as ‘possibilities’ that are real because realizable. Conversely, to Wright, they are extrapolations of existing social forms whose future combination could result in socialism. As such, Bhaskar's philosop...
Research
Full-text available
List of my publications NOTE My books are fréquently incorrectly listed on this site as ´articles'. Telling them so makes no difference!!!
Chapter
This contribution analyses the Sustainable Development Goals (United Nations Transforming Our World. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development 2015) and their relation to education. In a first part, the conception of education, underlying the UN vision, is criticized, since education must be considered as a structured social institution, where th...
Chapter
Ontogenetically every newborn human has to establish satisfactory and sustainable relations with the three orders of natural reality: Nature, the Practical Order and the Social Order if they are to survive and thrive. Each order has changed greatly since c. 1980 and exacerbates our liabilities: Climate Change threatens humanity with finitude, the I...
Chapter
This is the last of five books in the series on ‘Social Morphogenesis’. Contributors explore whether or not Late Modernity is transforming into a Morphogenic social formation and, insofar as morphogenetic processes are intensifying, do these promote or diminish human well-being (Eudaimonia). After summarizing the four main characteristics of a Morp...
Chapter
Der Critical Realism, wie er seit den 1970er Jahren im angelsächsischen Raum entwickelt wurde, nimmt nicht nur viele Einsichten gegenwärtiger Realismusdebatten vorweg, sondern arbeitet diese zugleich für die Sozialwissenschaften aus. Jenseits des modernen Natur/Kultur-Dualismus schlägt dieser Ansatz eine nicht-deterministische Kausalitätskonzeption...
Book
This book, the last volume in the Social Morphogenesis series, examines whether or not a Morphogenic society can foster new modes of human relations that could exercise a form of ‘relational steering’, protecting and promoting a nuanced version of the good life for all. It analyses the way in which the intensification of morphogenesis and the dimin...
Chapter
Does intense social change (morphogenesis) and the lack of a stable social context spell a crisis for both normative consensus and legal regulation of the social order? In other words, does the valid and effective rule of law depend upon morphostasis in society? Traditionally, normativity, social integration and legal regulation were held to be mut...
Chapter
The ‘problem of normativity’ concerns the role that society’s value system, norms and conventions play in legislative regulation. Rapid social change was always problematic, for example the swift displacement of French Revolutionary law by the Napoleonic Code. What validated one or the other, since both broke with previous social norms? Traditional...
Book
This volume explores the development and consequences of morphogenesis on normative regulation. It starts out by describing the great normative transformations from morphostasis, as the precondition of a harmonious relationship between legal validity and normative consensus in society, to morphogenesis, which tends to strongly undermine existing la...
Chapter
Many social theorists now call themselves 'relational sociologists', but mean entirely different things by it. The majority endorse a 'flat ontology', dealing exclusively with dyadic relations. Consequently, they cannot explain the context in which relationships occur or their consequences, except as resultants of endless 'transactions'. This book...
Chapter
Many social theorists now call themselves 'relational sociologists', but mean entirely different things by it. The majority endorse a 'flat ontology', dealing exclusively with dyadic relations. Consequently, they cannot explain the context in which relationships occur or their consequences, except as resultants of endless 'transactions'. This book...
Chapter
Many social theorists now call themselves 'relational sociologists', but mean entirely different things by it. The majority endorse a 'flat ontology', dealing exclusively with dyadic relations. Consequently, they cannot explain the context in which relationships occur or their consequences, except as resultants of endless 'transactions'. This book...
Chapter
Many social theorists now call themselves 'relational sociologists', but mean entirely different things by it. The majority endorse a 'flat ontology', dealing exclusively with dyadic relations. Consequently, they cannot explain the context in which relationships occur or their consequences, except as resultants of endless 'transactions'. This book...
Chapter
What are the drivers of Relational Subjects? Evaluating social relations The Relational Subject is not only s/he who acts reflexively taking into account her/his relations with significant others, but is s/he who operates on/with/through social relations. Therefore, it becomes essential to understand how operations happen and are configured. We can...
Chapter
In Volume II, I advanced the generative mechanism of late modernity as constituted by neo-capitalist market competition and the diffusion of digital science needing to work together, and resulting in intensified social morphogenesis. Digital scientists were concerned with the diffusion of their innovations and the economic vanguard with their own p...
Chapter
This series of books examines a single question: ‘Will Late Modernity be replaced by a social formation that could be called Morphogenic Society?’ Social theorists of different persuasions have accepted that ‘morphogenesis’ has rapidly increased from the last decades of the Twentieth century (and some have presumed this means that processes of ‘mor...
Chapter
In ordinary life, we, qua individuals, often speak in the plural referring to a ‘We’. People say: we had lunch together, we went on holiday together, we wrote a book together, we furnished our house together, we had the same opinion about that, and so on and so forth. This ‘we’ is a term whose referent remains unspecified and serves only to indicat...
Book
Many social theorists now call themselves 'relational sociologists', but mean entirely different things by it. The majority endorse a 'flat ontology', dealing exclusively with dyadic relations. Consequently, they cannot explain the context in which relationships occur or their consequences, except as resultants of endless 'transactions'. This book...
Book
This volume examines how generative mechanisms emerge in the social order and their consequences. It does so in the light of finding answers to the general question posed in this book series: Will Late Modernity be replaced by a social formation that could be called Morphogenic Society? This volume clarifies what a ‘generative mechanism’ is, to ach...
Book
A central question of social theory is: How do society's objective features influence its members to reproduce or transform society through their actions? This volume examines how objective social conditioning is mediated by the subjective reflexivity of individuals. On the basis of a series of in-depth interviews, Margaret S., Archer identifies th...
Chapter
In this chapter a specific generative mechanism is advanced to account for the profound changes that have taken place since 1980. It derives from the enlarged pool of ‘contingent complementarities’ within the Cultural System and the exploitation of these complementary items to produce novel morphogenetic effects. The key institutions involved are,...
Chapter
This introduction takes up a theme that is present in all nine chapters: Namely, is some degree of enduring stability necessary amidst intensifying social change? Do agents and actors need this in order to plan their own lives and the courses of action they will take in the social order? Many Social Theorists do maintain that (some degree of) morph...
Book
This volume examines the reasons for intensified social change after 1980; a peaceful process of a magnitude that is historically unprecedented. It examines the kinds of novelty that have come about through morphogenesis and the elements of stability that remain because of morphostasis. It is argued that this pattern cannot be explained simply by ‘...
Chapter
The book discusses ‘social morphogenesis’ within late modernity and the potential of this process to reshape the social order. Contributors are not signatories to a manifesto for a Morphogenic Society but are willing to consider this notion given rapid global change, the current crisis and perceived inadequacies in macroscopic social theory today....
Chapter
Social theory has always been a borrower. With the increasing rapidity of social and systemic change, the attractions of cybernetics and general systems theory have grown over half a century. This chapter traces four succeeding phases in systems theory, treating all as misleading metaphors for conceptualizing processes of social change: (i) 'variet...
Book
Now with a new introduction, Social Origins of Educational Systems is vital reading for all those interested in the sociology of education.
Chapter
Why has Reflexivity attracted so little attention among relational social theorists, at least in North America? Reflexivity, on my definition, is a thoroughly relational phenomenon: “the regular exercise of the mental ability, shared by all normal people, to consider themselves in relation to their social contexts and vice versa” (Archer 2007, 4)....
Book
The rate of social change has speeded up in the last three decades, but how do we explain this? This volume ventures what the generative mechanism is that produces such rapid change and discusses how this differs from late Modernity. Contributors examine if an intensification of morphogenesis (positive feedback that results in a change in social fo...
Article
This book completes Margaret Archer's trilogy investigating the role of reflexivity in mediating between structure and agency. What do young people want from life? Using analysis of family experiences and life histories, her argument respects the properties and powers of both and presents the 'internal conversation' as the site of their interplay....
Article
This article takes the form of a debate between the two authors on the social ontology of propositional culture. Archer applies the morphogenetic approach, analysing culture as a cycle of interaction between the Cultural System and Socio-Cultural Interaction. In this model, the Cultural System is comprised of the objective content of intelligibilia...
Article
The preliminary part of this paper demonstrates how defective models of personal identity have dominated social theory since the Enlightenment, and indicates their deficiencies for social theorizing and as a basis for the Catholic Church’s social teaching. Part two examines the consequences of conceptions that are incompatible with the four pillars...
Article
Full-text available
Many scholars continue to ascribe a fundamental role to routine action in social theory and defend the continuing relevance of Bourdieu's concept of habitus. Meanwhile, the majority recognize the importance of reflexivity. In this article, Archer examines three versions of efforts to render these concepts mutually compatible: "empirical combination...
Article
This article examines the convergence between Italian relational sociology, developed by Pierpaolo Donati and introduced here by Emmanuele Morandi, and critical realism. Whilst the latter is preoccupied with relations between people and structures, Donati sees the whole social order as a relational entity sui generis. Consequently, relational socio...
Article
name but a handful of such figures) are social theorists whose philosophical importance is all too often missed (or ignored) by professional philosophers. The main reason for this is obvious: they are by training and appointment social scientists, while professional philosophy tends to be an insular discipline. 1 Disciplinary purity, like most othe...
Chapter
The Myth of Cultural Integration: Composition and Conservation of the CanonFallacies of ConflationThe Nonconflationary Approach to Culture: On AnalyticalDualismConclusion
Article
This paper gives the author’s reflexive account of the trajectory taken since 1979 in developing the “morphogenetic approach”. Authorial intentionality is defended as possessing “self-warrant”, that is as first-person knowledge whose authority cannot be replaced by interpretations in the third person. The rest of the article traces book-by-book how...
Article
This paper gives the author's reflexive account of the trajectory taken since 1979 in developing the "morphogenetic approach". Authorial intentionality is defended as possessing "self-warrant", that is as first-person knowledge whose authority cannot be replaced by interpretations in the third person. The rest of the article traces book-by-book how...
Book
How do we reflect upon ourselves and our concerns in relation to society, and vice versa? Human reflexivity works through ‘internal conversations’ using language, but also emotions, sensations and images. Most people acknowledge this ‘inner-dialogue’ and can report upon it. However, little research has been conducted on ‘internal conversations’ and...
Article
Why do emotions matter? Across the centuries the same answer has been returned; they are the salt of life without which it would lack savour. Thus, St Augustine asked rhetorically if we would not consider a general apatheia to be the worst of human and moral defects. Today, Elster repeats this refrain: “simply, emotions matter because if we did not...
Article
Full-text available
How many times do I have to tell you that this is a BOOK. I have sent you my LIST OF PUBLICATIONS so you can STOP MAKING THESE MISTAKES. IDON'T NEED YOU OR YOUR INSULTING SUGGESTIONS ABOUT 'INCREASING MY PROFILE'!!!!! unless you rectify these errors, of your making, I will simply leave.
Book
Humanity and the very notion of the human subject are under threat from postmodernist thinking which has declared not only the 'Death of God' but also the 'Death of Man'. This book is a revindication of the concept of humanity, rejecting contemporary social theory that seeks to diminish human properties and powers. Archer argues that being human de...
Article
This is a critical response to Immanuel Wallerstein's `Social Science and Contemporary Society: The Vanishing Guarantees of Rationality' in this journal, March 1996, and his claim that social scientists, as the new `intellectual class', have the task of dissociating themselves from Liberal Instrumental Rationality in order to help `turn the world a...
Article
Full-text available
Résumé Ce texte traite de la théorie sociale au lendemain du positivisme. Il fait un examen critique de trois types de théories contemporainesdont les présupposés ontologiques fusionnent structure et agent. Au moyen de leur méthodologie explicative respective,ces théories font apparaître cette fusion dans leurs analyses de la société. Dans la derni...
Book
This reader is designed to make accessible in one volume, to lay person and academic, student and teacher alike, key readings to stimulate debate about and within critical realism.
Article
This paper underlines the importance of the distinction between `social' and `system' integration (agency and structure) introduced by David Lockwood in 1964. Its four sections (i) examine the original difficulty of maintaining any distinction between the `parts' of society and its `people' against the social ontology of Individualism whose propone...
Book
People are inescapably shaped by the culture in which they live, while culture itself is made and remade by people. Human beings in their daily lives feel a genuine freedom of thought and belief, yet this is unavoidably constrained by cultural limitations--such as those imposed by the language spoken, the knowledge developed and the information ava...
Book
Building on her seminal contribution to social theory in Culture and Agency, in this 1995 book Margaret Archer develops her morphogenetic approach, applying it to the problem of structure and agency. Since structure and agency constitute different levels of stratified social reality, each possesses distinctive emergent properties which are real and...
Article
In this Address I want to advocate a single Sociology, whose ultimate unity rests on acknowledging the universality of human reasoning; to endorse a single World, whose oneness is based on adopting a realist ontology; and to predicate any services the Discipline can give to this World upon accepting the fundamental unicity of Humanity. Ironically,...
Article
This paper examines a new radical relativism, epitomised in David Bloor's 'strong programme', which asserts the social character and social causation of all knowledge. It thus stakes an explanatory claim for the sociology of knowledge to the entire cultural domain. Traditionally resistance to relativism rests on counter-asserting (a) the necessary...
Article
What culture is and what culture does are the subjects of conceptual confusion throughout social theory. This state of affairs is attributed to a pervasive Myth of Cultural Integration which wrongly conflates Cultural System integration (a logical property characterizing relations between ideas) with Socio-Cultural integration (a causal property pe...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I have sent you my 'List of Publications' so that these errors could be eliminated.
Instead of correcting these mistakes, you listed it as a publication for a short time.
(I have 43 published BOOKS)

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