Maren Huck

Maren Huck
University of Derby · Environmental Sustainability Research Centre

Dr. rer. nat.

About

54
Publications
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Introduction
Main main interest lie on the one hand in the evolution and maintenance of (primate) social organisation and mating systems (pair-living, sexual monogamy, bi-parental care in owl monkeys), as well as the impact of floaters on population dynamics. On the other hand, I am interested in domestic cat behaviour and welfare as well as the alledged impact of domestic cat predation on prey populations.

Publications

Publications (54)
Article
Using time-lapse photography in a laboratory setting, we exposed Anodonta anatina and Unio pictorum for 4 h to algal (Chlorella vulgaris) concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 20.0 mg ash-free dry mass l−1 and to three different temperatures (11 ± 1, 15 ± 1 and 19 ± 1 °C). We analysed the proportion of mussels in locomotion, duration of locomotory act...
Article
In response to the COVID-19 crisis, numerous academic conferences and seminars were moved online. Some remote (online) seminars have the aim to be maintained permanently after the pandemic, offering weekly opportunities for scientists, postdocs, and students to learn about research and to improve global networking. Remote seminars are a good option...
Article
Full-text available
The metabolic activity of unionid mussels influences the oxygen fluxes and other physical and chemical characteristics in aquatic systems. Unionid oxygen consumption rate during digestion and its dependency on food availability is understudied. In laboratory conditions, we quantified the oxygen consumption rate of Anodonta anatina and Unio pictorum...
Article
"Monogamy" and pair bonding have long been of interest to anthropologists and primatologists. Their study contributes to our knowledge of human evolutionary biology and social evolution without the cultural trappings associated with studying human societies directly. Here, we first provide an overview of theoretical considerations, followed by an e...
Article
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Behavioral ecologists, evolutionary biologists, and anthropologists have been long fascinated by the existence of “monogamy” in the animal kingdom. Multiple studies have explored the factors underlying its evolution and maintenance, sometimes with contradicting and contentious conclusions. These studies have been plagued by a persistent use of fuzz...
Article
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Primates use different types of vocalizations in a variety of contexts. Some of the most studied types have been the long distance or loud calls. These vocalizations have been associated with mate defense, mate attraction, and resource defense, and it is plausible that sexual selection has played an important role in their evolution. Focusing on id...
Article
Free roaming domestic animals can have a profound effect on wildlife. To better understand and mitigate any impact, it is important to understand the behaviour patterns of the domestic animals, and how other variables might influence their behaviour. Direct observation is not always feasible and bears the potential risk of observer effects. The use...
Article
This study aimed to assess how the size-frequency distributions of coral genera varied between reefs under different fishing pressures in two contrasting Indian Ocean locations (the Maldives and East Africa). Using generalized linear mixed models, we were able to demonstrate that complex interactions occurred between coral genera, coral size class...
Article
Full-text available
The Humid Chaco has a high mammalian biodiversity. As habitats are threatened due to exploitation and environmental degradation, protected areas can act as refuges for wild animals. In 2006, ca 1,100 ha of gallery forest were established as the “Owl Monkey Reserve” within the private cattle ranch “Estancia Guaycoléc”. The mammalian species richness...
Article
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The fate and behaviour of animals that leave their natal group (‘floaters’) is usually poorly understood, which can limit the understanding of a species' population dynamics. Attempted immigrations can have serious negative effects on residents who therefore may forcibly reject intruders. Consequently, floaters face a dilemma: they need to leave th...
Chapter
Primate societies are not static. Group composition changes due to births and deaths, and also by emigration and immigration of individuals between different groups. These transfers, while considered costly for the individual, have important implications for the individual itself and the population as a whole. While, generally speaking, dispersal i...
Article
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The international trade in night monkeys (Aotus spp.), found throughout Central and South America, has been regulated by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) since 1975. We present a quantitative analysis of this trade from all 9 range countries, over 4 decades, and compare domestic legislation...
Article
The moon can profoundly influence the activity patterns of animals. If predators are more successful under bright moonlight, prey species are likely to respond by shifting their own activity patterns (predator-avoidance hypothesis). However, the assumption that prey will necessarily avoid full-moon nights does not take into account that moonlight a...
Poster
Full-text available
Azara’s owl monkeys (Aotus azarae) are socially and genetically monogamous, territorial primates in which offspring of both sexes disperse from their natal groups. After dispersing, individuals range solitarily for a period ranging from a few days to many months. Understanding the behavior and physiology of individuals during the solitary life hist...
Article
In species of mammals that habitually bear single offspring, like most anthropoid primates, the occurrence of twins is expected to impose considerable energetic costs on the caretakers. The question then arises of how caregivers cope with the potentially increased costs of raising twins. These increased costs should lead to differing developmental...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the evolution of mating systems, a central topic in evolutionary biology for more than 50 years, requires examining the genetic consequences of mating and the relationships between social systems and mating systems. Among pair-living mammals, where genetic monogamy is extremely rare, the extent of extra-group paternity rates has been...
Article
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In Argentina there are six species of cracids, the Bare-faced Curassow (Crax fasciolata) being the most endangered and geographically restricted. Given that the main populations of the Barefaced Curassow apparently exist along the rivers of eastern Formosa, the study was conducted in the gallery forests of the Pilagá River in the Guaycolec Ranch to...
Article
PRELIMINARY STUDY ON THE ECOLOGY, BEHAVIOUR AND DEMOGRAPHY OF THE BARE-FACED CURASSOW (CRAX FASCIOLATA) IN THE GALLERY FOREST OF THE PILAGÁ RIVER, FORMOSA, ARGENTINA.— In Argentina there are six species of cracids, the Bare-faced Curassow (Crax fasciolata) being the most endangered and geographically restricted. Given that the main populations of...
Conference Paper
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Los monos mirikiná (Aotus azarae) son primates pequeños y socialmente monógamos que generalmente viven en grupos territoriales de dos a seis individuos. En una población de monos mirikiná que reside en las selvas en galería del Gran Chaco de Formosa, Argentina, tanto los machos como las hembras se dispersan de sus grupos natales entre los dos y cin...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Dispersal and gene flow in populations of highly mobile mammals, such as wolves, are often determined by the landscape structure and ecological connectivity. Previous studies on the genetic struc- ture of Polish wolves revealed three major subpopulations: Carpathian Mountains in southern Poland, Roztocze in the southeast, and the Lowland in northea...
Article
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We report the first record of Cuniculus paca for the province of Formosa in Argentina and the Argentinean Gran Chaco region based on one skull found close to the river Pilagá (estancia Guaycolec: 25° 58' S, 58° 11' W) and on 18 photos taken by camera traps. Since the photos include time-stamps, we were able to evaluate the activity pattern of the p...
Article
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Polygynous animals are often highly dimorphic, and show large sex-differences in the degree of intra-sexual competition and aggression, which is associated with biased operational sex ratios (OSR). For socially monogamous, sexually monomorphic species, this relationship is less clear. Among mammals, pair-living has sometimes been assumed to imply e...
Chapter
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In contrast to birds, male mammals rarely help to raise the offspring. Of all mammals, only among rodents, carnivores, and primates, males are sometimes intensively engaged in providing infant care (Kleiman and Malcolm 1981). Male caretaking of infants has long been recognized in nonhuman primates (Itani 1959). Given that infant care behavior can h...
Article
Full-text available
According to the Evolutionary Theory of the Family, the replacement of one pair-member by an intruder may have profound consequences for the existing offspring. Step-parents are expected to provide less care towards unrelated immatures than to genetic offspring, unless caring also serves as a mating strategy. Furthermore, because an intruder will b...
Article
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Broad-winged Hawk Buteo platypterus breeds in North America and primarily winters from southern Mexico into South America south mainly along the Andes from Colombia to north-west Argentina. We recorded an adult Broad-winged Hawk at Estancia Guaycolec, Formosa province, Argentina, using an infrared-activated camera-trap baited with cat food, during...
Article
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Life history predicts that in sexually dimorphic species in which males are the larger sex, males should reach sexual maturity later than females (or vice versa if females are the larger sex). The corresponding prediction that in sexually monomorphic species maturational rates will differ little between the sexes has rarely been tested. We report h...
Article
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Determining ecological corridors is crucial for conservation efforts in fragmented habitats. Commonly employed least cost path (LCP) analysis relies on the underlying cost matrix. By using Ecological Niche Factor Analysis, we minimized the problems connected with subjective cost assessment or the use of presence/absence data. We used data on the wo...
Article
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Carnivores are often particularly sensitive to landscape fragmentation. Ecological corridors may help to connect local populations, ensuring gene flow and retaining viable meta-populations. We aimed to establish habitat suitability models for two large carnivores in Poland, the grey wolf Canis lupus Linnaeus, 1758 and the Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx Li...
Article
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Natural England receives an increasing number of complaints about problems caused by badgers Meles meles in urban and suburban environments, most of which concern problems caused by the digging of burrows (setts). The aim of our study was to identify factors related to the presence of badger setts in urban and suburban areas, in order to provide in...
Article
Radio-telemetry is often the method of choice for Studies of species whose behaviour is difficult to observe directly. However, considerable debate has ensued about the best way of deriving home-range estimates. In recent years, kernel estimators have become the most widely used method, together with the oldest and simplest method, the minimum conv...
Article
By studying the responses of different species to urbanization, it is possible to understand the impact of this type of habitat modification and to explore, more generally, the link between variations in the environment and changes in behaviour. We radio collared 17 badgers Meles meles from six social groups in a 1 km2 urban study area in Brighton,...
Article
1. Urban and rural populations of animals can differ in their behaviour, both in order to meet their ecological requirements and due to the constraints imposed by different environments. The study of urban populations can therefore offer useful insights into the behavioural flexibility of a species as a whole, as well as indicating how the species...
Article
Damage caused by badger setts is an important source of human–carnivore conflict in urban areas of the UK, yet little is known about the spatial distribution of urban badger setts or their pattern of occupation. We compared the density, spatial distribution and size of setts in four urban and two rural study areas in the UK and assessed the applica...
Article
Sleeping sites are an important aspect of an animal's ecology given the length of time that they spend in them. The sleep ecology of wild saddleback and mustached tamarins is examined using a long-term data set covering three mixed-species troops and 1,300+ tamarin nights. Seasonal changes in photoperiod accounted for a significant amount of variat...
Article
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Grooming is the most common form of affiliative behavior in primates that apart from hygienic and hedonistic benefits offers important social benefits for the performing individuals. This study examined grooming behavior in a cooperatively breeding primate species, characterized by single female breeding per group, polyandrous matings, dizygotic tw...
Article
Dispersal and philopatry influence gene flow and thus the spatio-genetic structure within and between populations. In callitrichids the flexible social and mating system corresponds with a variable migration pattern where both sexes might be philopatric or might disperse. We investigated the relationship between the spatio-genetic structure and mig...
Article
We studied patterns of genetic relatedness and paternity in moustached tamarins, small Neotropical primates living in groups of 1-4 adult males and 1-4 adult females. Generally only one female per group breeds, mating with more than one male. Twin birth are the norm. In order to examine the genetic consequences of this mating pattern, DNA was extra...
Article
Reproductive success in male primates can be influenced by testosterone (T) and cortisol (C). We examined them in wild Saguinus mystax via fecal hormone analysis. Firstly, we wanted to characterize male hormonal status over the course of the year. Further we tested the influence of the reproductive status of the breeding female, social instability,...
Article
This paper examines demographic events in the context of population structure and genetic relationships in groups of wild moustached tamarins (Saguinus mystax). We used a combination of long-term behavioral observations and genetic data from a total of eight groups from a population in northeastern Peruvian Amazonia. The mean group size was 6.0 (ra...
Article
In moustached tamarin (Saguinus mystax) groups, the single breeding female mates polyandrously with most or all nonrelated adult males. Nonetheless, paternity is monopolized in many groups by a single male. No evidence for male endocrine suppression has been found in this species. The proximate mechanisms of monopolization thus remain poorly unders...
Thesis
Full-text available
Males are generally believed to show much higher variability in reproductive success than females. Males can increase their reproductive success mainly by increasing the number of copulations with different mates while promiscuous females will theoretically not fare better than monogamous ones. In mammals, males are predisposed to desert their mate...
Article
Various hypotheses about adaptive and non-adaptive mechanisms of non-parental infant care have been put forward for different taxa (Emlen et al., 1991). The Neotropical callitrichid primates are renowned for their cooperative care of the twin litters. None of the studies conducted in the wild included information on genetic relationships within gro...
Article
Full-text available
In callitrichid primates, reproduction is usually restricted to a single female per group. Reproductive rate is high and the occurrence of a postpartum estrus can lead to simultaneous lactation and pregnancy. In contrast, nonreproductive females often show ovarian inactivity. However, most studies on callitrichid reproductive physiology have been c...
Article
Full-text available
dynamics of the bog fritillary butterfly: comparison of demographic parameters and dispersal between a continuous and a highly fragmented landscape.
Article
Co‐operative defence against predators is probably one of the advantages of primate sociality [Schaik, 1983]. It usually takes the form of vigilance and mobbing of predators, but in larger primates may also involve attacking predators [Cheney and Wrangham, 1987]. The small‐bodied callitrichines are often considered as relying on crypt...
Article
We investigated the disturbance effects of environmental stimuli, typical of those which pigs might experience under farm conditions, on the spatial memory abilities of domestic pigs, Sus scrofa. Ten male pigs were trained to perform a win-shift foraging task in an eight-arm radial maze. Each day, they individually entered the maze to search for fo...

Projects

Projects (11)
Project
With the overarching goal to increase the welfare of cats (and their humans) we want to investigate various aspects of cat behaviour. We want to get a better understanding of cat communication both with other cats and their humans. We want to understand how cats behave indoors and outdoors, depending on whether they have outdoor access at all or not. We want to understand how human traits influence their relationship with the cats under their care.
Archived project