Marcus Hatch

Marcus Hatch
Queen Mary, University of London | QMUL · School of Geography

PhD

About

7
Publications
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Citations

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports new fieldwork at Warsash which clarifies the terrace stratigraphic framework of the Palaeolithic archaeology of the region. Sections were recorded in former gravel pits and at coastal locations, supplemented by the use of ground penetrating radar and luminescence dating techniques. The region’s extensive borehole archive was also...
Article
This paper presents new work on the Lower and Middle Palaeolithic assemblages recovered from Pleistocene gravels of the River Test at Warsash, Hampshire. Historic map and artefact analyses enable the geological context to be established for substantial portions of the Warsash Palaeolithic record, which, when combined with new data relating to regio...
Article
The Bytham River was one of the major pre-Anglian (MIS 12) rivers of eastern England. Flowing from the Midlands to the East Anglian coast, it has been recognised at numerous sites by its distinctive lithological suite, containing significant quantities of quartzite, quartz and Carboniferous chert that originate from central England. In the Brecklan...
Article
Full-text available
Fluvial terrace sequences of Pleistocene rivers provide a chronological framework for examining broad patterns of change in the Palaeolithic record. Collections of artefacts recovered from individual terraces represent a time-averaged sample of the range of lithic technology discarded in a river valley over thousands of years. These can be compared...
Article
The Early and early Middle Pleistocene archaeological record in Britain from c. 900 to 500 ka marks a critical shift in human occupation of northwest Europe, from occasional pioneer populations with simple core and flake technology to more widespread occupation associated with the appearance of Acheulean technology. Key to understanding this record...
Article
Full-text available
Constraining the speed of sea level rise at the start of an interglacial is important to understanding the size of the ‘window of opportunity’ available for hominin migration. This is particularly important during the last interglacial when there is no evidence for significant hominin occupation anywhere in Britain. There are very few finer grained...
Article
Full-text available
The Breckland is one of the most important areas in Britain for understanding the changing nature of human occupation of north-west Europe through deep time. An unparalleled geological sequence spanning a million years provides the stratigraphic framework in which the region’s Lower and Middle Palaeolithic record can be examined and understood. The...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This project seeks to use the exceptional geological, environmental and archaeological records of the Breckland of East Anglia to examine the relationships between human culture, technology and the changing environment and palaeolandscape during the Middle Pleistocene.
Archived project
The Solent River was the largest river of southern England during the Quaternary (Ice Age) Period and a major gateway for early human populations entering Britain. Abundant early Palaeolithic artefacts are found in gravels that the river left behind. The main aim of the project is to achieve a better understanding of the nature and dating of this immense archaeological resource. Several major questions about early human occupation can be addressed through the archaeological record of the Solent River: • When did humans first appear in the Solent Valley? • When did handaxes and other technological innovations appear? • Were there changes in population over time? • How did the changing geography of Britain, in particular the formation of the English Channel, affect occupation in this area?