Marcus Harmes

Marcus Harmes
University of Southern Queensland  · Open Access College

PhD (UQ)

About

100
Publications
3,634
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69
Citations

Publications

Publications (100)
Article
This study examines how Australian public universities have a presence in the various discipline areas recognised by the Australian Academy of the Humanities. Using the prism of public value, we interpret how universities articulate the legitimacy of teaching humanities. Through a careful audit of available secondary data, we advance a typology of...
Article
A substantial number of studies have conceptualized the interaction of gender with carceral spaces. This scholarship has proliferated across the 2000s as the real‐world practice of mass incarceration has made prisons larger and more troubling. Women, including women of color, comprise a significantly smaller prison population than male prisoners; h...
Chapter
British broadcasting began as a Christian undertaking and remained so well into the later twentieth century. Against this prevailing assumption, Chap. 2 brings close attention to the 1953 Coronation of Elizabeth II, moving beyond oft-repeated points in broadcasting history relating to its audience and impact to show it among a wider constellation o...
Chapter
This chapter continues to examine the Church as it appears in drama in the midst of its different communities. The focus is on the domestic tensions inside the episcopal palace and the vicarage and the way domestic stresses reach outward to community tensions regarding human sexuality. Pressures inside the bishop’s palace and the vicarage, brought...
Chapter
The Church of England’s internet strapline proclaims it is a ‘Christian presence in every community’. This chapter and the next two examine the Church as aspects of community, refracted through drama. This chapter examines the importance of dramatisations of the Church of England for understanding upper-, middle- and lower-class identities as a pre...
Chapter
A narrower and tighter focus on individual clergy rather than the institution is explored in this chapter, considering the reasons clergy began to appear on television and the sometimes explosive impact they had in doing so. There were two-way relationships. Clerical careers could be enriched and advanced by an effective television performance, whi...
Chapter
The chapters in Part I and Part II moved from non-fictional broadcasting, both great and small, to fictional drama. Because the established Church monopolises the coronation of the monarch and hosts major events of celebration and mourning, the Church of England remains ever-present to television audiences of millions. As an entity on a television...
Chapter
Sharp-witted political comedy about the Church illustrates how British television has dramatised the appointment of the Church of England’s bishops. This chapter examines comedy set against the real-life politics of appointment, as politicians decide who will and will not lead the Church. The chapter builds a study from episodes of BBC comedies Yes...
Chapter
The focus of this chapter is the dramatic potential broadcasters have found in the genre of science fiction, and the tension that can underpin drama when Christian faith is challenged by scientific progress. Its principle focus is the vastly controversial Oscar-winning 1965 docu-drama The War Game, and the intersection between the programme, the Ch...
Chapter
This chapter changes focus from Part I, moving on from looking at the Church as a shaper of the medium to how the Church was shaped by it. Fictional programmes about the Church cross genres and formats. But in the early to mid-1960s, comedy marks an important point of transition in the Church’s interactions with television. The 1960s comedies Our M...
Chapter
Identifying how the Church shaped the medium includes understanding the policy input that contributed to the expanding television service. In this chapter, this includes the contribution of clergy to the shaping of the third terrestrial channel and their strategising to build contacts and sway policy makers. There are also marker points showing the...
Chapter
The previous chapter considered how television positioned clergy as the signifiers and arbiters of good taste. The popular drama Foyle’s War is the fulcrum on which this chapter turns, as a transition from the deaths caused by war to the investigation of murder as television showed communities fractured by death. Death in communities caused by bomb...
Article
Purpose The purpose of the study is to examine educational history through television's portrayal of educational activity in post-apocalyptic society. The paper examines how and why television drama set after a catastrophe is in dialogue with, but rejects, both contemporary government discourse of “protect and survive”. Design/methodology/approach...
Book
This book will be the first systematic and comprehensive text to analyze the many and contrasting appearances of the Church of England on television. It covers a range of genres and programs including crime drama, science fiction, comedy, including the specific genre of ‘ecclesiastical comedy’, zombie horror and non-fiction broadcasting. Readers in...
Article
Incarcerated students face multiple obstacles and constraints while attempting to complete tertiary and pre-tertiary educational programs within Australian prisons. Some of these barriers relate to the individual's attitudes and actions, during and prior to imprisonment, while other barriers may relate to systemic bias and social disadvantages, whi...
Book
Roger Delgado is instantly recognisable as the Master in Doctor Who but his most famous role was also one of his last. He died aged only 55 but his career was long and productive including roles in much loved television programs such as The Saint, The Avengers, Quatermass II and films including the Hammer horrors. His brilliant versatility made him...
Chapter
Full-text available
Universities are fascinating places to work. A “provocative social cocktail” (Symes, 2004, p. 395) is one particularly apt description, although for some, the fascination could be ironically expressed as a reaction to the giddying changes and restructures and revisionings that define the contemporary university.
Article
Anglican Enlightenment: Orientalism, Religion and Politics in England and its Empire, 1648–1715. By William J. Bulmer . Cambridge Studies in Early Modern British History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. xix + 340 pp. $89.90 cloth; $49.99 e-book. - Volume 85 Issue 4 - Marcus Harmes
Chapter
Doctor Who began in a school and now after more than 50 years has ended up back in one. The first scenes of the long-running science fiction series Doctor Who were set in a science lab and a history classroom in an East End secondary modern. From that opening, the program has returned again and again to educational themes and to power relationships...
Article
This article examines the portrayal of Chinese characters in Get Smart (1965–70). Get Smart was a 1960s American spy comedy based on the premise of good (Control) against evil (KAOS) set against the back drop of the Cold War. Many of the episodes in this comedy featured a Chinese character as the enemy. This article will examine the way the charact...
Chapter
Myths occupy an enduringly powerful position in teaching and learning objectives, in activities and in outcomes in contemporary education. Myths also generate a range of responses from education researchers: some researchers seek to challenge and transform persistent myths associated with disempowering stereotypes; some focus on interrogating myths...
Article
Lady Anne Drury was an early seventeenth-century English gentlewoman who installed in her country house a decorated ‘closet’, or a small chamber decorated with painted panels. The images contained therein are, for the most part, allegorical and suggest a great deal about Lady Drury’s education, erudition, and also something of her inner emotional l...
Book
For the people of early modern England, the dividing line between the natural and supernatural worlds was both negotiable and porous - particularly when it came to issues of authority. Without a precise separation between ‘science’ and ‘magic’ the realm of the supernatural was a contested one, that could be used both to bolster and challenge variou...
Book
A myth empowers by providing a foundation story of a society, culture or civilization, bringing coherence and meaning to identity and underpinning custom. But 'myth' also carries darker meaning, suggesting ideas or practices that are fallacious or accepted uncritically.This book engages with these possible understandings of myths and uses them to i...
Article
Full-text available
Valerie Wee’s monograph on American remakes of Japanese supernatural horror films is a contribution to Routledge’s Advances in Film Studies series and examines a cluster of films made in the late 1990s and early 2000s. These are films which in their first incarnation were Japanese (such as Ringu) which were then remade by Hollywood (for example Rin...
Book
Although it started as a British television show with a small but devoted fan base, Doctor Who has grown in popularity and now appeals to audiences around the world. In the fifty-year history of the program, Doctor Who’s producers and scriptwriters have drawn on a dizzying array of literary sources and inspirations. Elements from Homer, classic lit...
Article
Senior members of the English Church became involved in cases of possession and dispossession in the later sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. They sought to exonerate women accused of witchcraft, and their involvement led to the disproving of the efficacy of dispossessions performed by anti-episcopal ministers. Although a number of bishops...
Article
Gothic themes and settings permeated British sf and horror in the later twentieth century. The vivid horror films made by Hammer Productions drew influence from gothic novels of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and in turn influenced numerous gothic serials in the sf series Doctor Who. While Doctor Who’s own creative personnel noted their de...
Article
The vestiarian controversies of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in England have attracted an extensive scholarly literature. This literature has tended to show the ways the Church of England could be condemned as inadequately reformed through attacks against its external trappings. Much less has been written about how the targets of attack...
Article
There is a trend among some scholars to stress the ‘relevance’ of their material by sometimes drawing very long bows between their content of many centuries ago and recent events. So it is with Amanda Bailey’s text on financial bondage in early modern England, which she begins with reference to the credit crunch of the early twenty-first century. W...
Article
Charters (or the collections of them called cartularies) are a major source of documentary evidence for early medieval history. But their use and interpretation, and indeed the trajectories they have taken in terms of preservation and transmission, are not straightforward. At least so suggest the editors of this collection. The chapters present evi...
Article
Toronto University Press’s ‘The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe’ presents a range of women’s writings from the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. The series has presented a range of sacred, secular, medical, and dramatic texts. This edition, number 24 in the series and edited by Jacqueline Broad, features an early eighteenth-centu...
Article
Former British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan described a politician’s life as being poised between an indiscretion and a farce. How much harder though must it have been to be a Catholic in seventeenth-century England and to be poised, or rather caught, between conscience and the demands of an intrusive and quite deadly Protestant state. This is t...
Article
This collection is edited by a parliamentary historian and a barrister and concerns the so-called The Agreements of the People, a series of documents on constitutional matters drawn up by the Levellers during a series of political crises of 1647. The chapters in the collection evaluate the origins, content, and immediate implications of these agree...
Article
Senior members of the English Church became involved in cases of possession and dispossession in the later sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. They sought to exonerate women accused of witchcraft, and their involvement led to the disproving of the efficacy of dispossessions performed by anti-episcopal ministers. Although a number of bishops...
Article
Cet article soutient qu’une série de films faits entre 1968 et 1971 et dont l’action se déroule au dix-septième siècle, marque l’arrivée d’une transformation, non seulement du cadre typique du film d’horreur britannique, mais aussi de la façon dont est représentée l’autorité patriarcale dans les oeuvres d’horreur britanniques. Alors que les films à...
Article
British science fiction is noteworthy for its juxtaposition of the familiar with the threatening, notably locating alien invasions in the Home Counties. This apposition can mean that one emblem of traditional Englishness - the Church of England - sits in tension with a cosmology which includes Martians, alien demons, and other preternatural menaces...
Article
Because the image conveyed by Margaret Thatcher was a construct and therefore artificial, what she looked and sounded like easily transferred from reality into heightened layers of parody and satire. But the way Thatcher appeared on a number of 1980s television texts is striking in terms of how her leadership and persona were read within gendered t...
Book
Armed with pistols and wearing jackboots, Bishop Henry Compton rode out in 1688 against his King but in defence of the Church of England and its bishops. His actions are a dramatic but telling indication of what was at stake for bishops in early modern England and Compton’s action at the height of the Restoration was the culmination of more than a...
Article
This edited collection is a recent contribution to Brill's series 'Intersections: Interdisciplinary Studies in Early Modern Culture'. As expected, therefore, this is an interdisciplinary collection, in terms of not only examining works and topics from a variety of European cultural contexts but also examining various literary, visual, and historica...
Article
This book, which offers strategies, hints, and methods for teaching the Latin, French, and English poetry of the late medieval poet John Gower, will be of most interest and value to lecturers teaching medieval literature at the undergraduate level. The text is not intended to offer any new or sustained scholarly analysis of Gower’s writings; rather...
Article
This edited collection covers a time period from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the middle of the nineteenth century and thus falls outside the early modern period that might be of interest to most readers of Parergon. Nonetheless for readers and researchers with an interest in the history of criminal justice, this selection of essays h...
Article
Jim Bolton’s study of money in the English economy runs through from Edgar’s reign to the beginning of the Tudor period. Rather than simply offer a chronological survey covering the Anglo-Saxons to the Tudors, Bolton divides his analysis into two sections. First is ‘Theories and problems’, in which he attempts to model the medieval English economy...
Conference Paper
Adolescence is a stage of life usually marked by its intensity of emotions. For those of a religious inclination this is likely to be a time of either fervent beliefs or spiritual confusion, as shown in the histories of female saints, virgin martyrs, or miraculous maidens whose first intense spiritual experiences occurred in puberty or early adoles...
Article
While puritan displeasure at bishops as being a so-called ‘Popish Dreg’ is much discussed in modern scholarly writing, attempts by defenders of the office to align this authority with reformed doctrines is an under-examined aspect of English ecclesiastical history. Analysing the period when the suppression of episcopacy under the Commonwealth was c...
Article
Alexander Kaufman's new text on the 1450 English uprising by Jack Cade and his followers is a focused analysis of the chronicles written in the fifteenth century which reported on this event. Kaufman's chief argument is that a divergent set of viewpoints can be located in the chronicles, rather than seeing them as reporting a 'single, unified grand...
Article
The year 2012 marks the 350th anniversary of the 1662 version of the Book of Common Prayer, the prayer book which comprises the daily offices, the Communion service, and the Ordinal of the Church of England. Brian Cummings’s edition of three different incarnations of the Book of Common Prayer, including the 1662 text, is therefore a timely publicat...
Article
The Nun’s Priest entertained Chaucer’s pilgrims with the story of Chaunticleer, a rooster, and his wife, Pertelote, and Chaunticleer’s dream that he will be attacked and killed by a fox. The story comprises 626 lines of the Canterbury Tales but its brevity exists in an inverse ratio to the volume of critical commentary it has provoked. Adding to th...
Article
This book is not so much a biography of Margaret Clitherow, the Elizabethan Catholic martyr (and now saint), but rather tells the story of her trial and execution in order to illuminate aspects of the experiences of Catholics, lay and clerical and male and female, under the Elizabethan state. Clitherow, the wife of a butcher from York's Shambles, w...
Article
Liz Herbert McAvoy has published extensively on medieval anchoritic traditions and this, her latest monograph, examines both male and female anchorites. Her emphasis, however, is firmly on the feminine nuances of anchorholds and reclusive religious practices. Surveying hermits, monks, holy men and women, and anchorites from sources including St Joh...
Article
This paper argues that proverbs provide valuable insights into popular opinion, in this case, in to the challenges and changes of reformed English religion. It builds a particular study of a celebrated proverb relating to the anticipated reign of 'King Henry IX', or Henry Prince of Wales (d.1612). Proverbial insights on this theme stand forth disti...
Article
Full-text available
Using data from a survey and interviews with First Year students in their first weeks, we developed a workshop that confronted lecturers with a similar range of new or different terms, concepts, technologies and practices. Bearing in mind also that some students may be conversing in their second or third language, while others are adjusting to a ne...
Article
Joshua Phillips begins his analysis of sixteenth-century English expressions of collective identity with a quotation from a Marian livery company charter which declares that the men of the company ‘may be in fact, deed and name one body by themselves for ever’. This is Phillips’s starting point for exploring how literature and rhetoric during the r...
Article
Kate Crassons's debut text (derived from her Duke University dissertation) is a lively and original survey of medieval accounts and understandings of poverty from the 1300s to the fifteenth century. Fascinatingly, the book is also contemporary in its emphasis. Crassons leaps into this theme, asserting from the outset that the ambiguity in both defi...
Article
The moral and sexual supervision of boys and young men became formalized in the purity movements which proliferated at the end of the century. Perhaps the most notable example was the Church of England Purity Society which was formed in 1880. The Church of England Purity Society was one part of the discursive controls which represented responses to...
Article
Cet article offre une analyse d’un aspect relativement négligé de la pensé épiscopalienne anglaise du dix-septième siècle. Il s’agit de la dégradation et des violences éprouvées par des membres épiscopaliens durant les guerres civiles, qui ont ensuite servi d’arguments en faveur de la puissance épiscopalienne. Pendant la Restauration, certains élém...
Article
This is a tightly focused study of a particular time (the fourteenth century), two particular places (Hereford and Tolentino) and a particular issue (how the miraculous interacted with gender and daily life). While a great deal has been written over many decades on the place of the miraculous and supernatural in the daily lives of medieval people,...
Article
As with other volumes in the Variorum series, this collection offers a series of papers, articles and essays that span the professional life of the scholar concerned. In this case, Wendy Davies, a medievalist specializing in early medieval Wales and Brittany, is represented by eighteen essays, mostly on Welsh History. A second volume in the Varioru...
Article
This book presents examples of cameos or miniatures written by Elizabethan, Jacobean and Caroline wits, epigraphers and churchmen. It contains 'characteries' or character sketches and comprises selections from the large surviving body of this type of literature. Editors Peter Groves and Geoffrey Hiller have selected them from collections published...
Article
The Theology of the Czech Brethren from Hus to Comenius offers an exploration of the interaction between community, ritual, and belief. It spans the fourteenth century up to the Moravians of the eighteenth century, and develops significant arguments concerning the evolution of the key Czech doctrine of the separation of church and state. While the...
Article
Although its focus is on one level of the order of ministry, this book is a wide-ranging survey, encompassing analysis of canon law, liturgy, religious art and the political structures of the post-Carolingian period. Its geographic range is similarly diverse, covering the British Isles to Croatia. The contributors, mostly from American universities...
Article
While Judith Richards' new biography of Mary Tudor studies a member of a much investigated period and dynasty, this accessible text finds much that is new to say about Mary. It offers a fresh analysis of the queen, whose reputation as 'bloody Mary' was advanced by sixteenth-century Protestant historians and martyrologists, chiefly John Foxe in his...
Article
This is a groundbreaking study of funerary architecture and the meanings, explicit and implicit, found in the often wildly elaborate tombs and cenotaphs erected in English cathedrals, churches and college chapels after the Reformation. Peter Sherlock's study brings this strikingly visual source material into the realm of historical study and histor...
Article
This paper interprets the tradition of persecution of Christians by the emperor Domitian (reigned 81-96CE), as narrated and interpreted by fathers of the church including Melito of Sardis, Tertullian, Clement of Rome and Eusebius. This paper argues that the portrayal of Domitian in Christian sources relates to the integration of the church with Rom...
Article
The reconstruction of the Church of England's hierarchy after 1660 has attracted extensive scholarly attention. Scholars have evaluated how far the doctrinal and ecclesial positions of the Laudian Church shaped the reconstruction of the episcopal hierarchy up to and beyond 1660, especially the Laudian recourse to theories of Jure divino episcopacy...
Article
Altars Restored examines altar policy in England over approximately one hundred and fifty years. Kenneth Fincham and Nicholas Tyacke offer a study of a highly specific topic, the chancel furnishings of English churches, cathedrals and college chapels, but one with a wide chronological scope, extending from the reign of Edward VI until the very end...
Article
Timothy Rosendale's new survey of the Book of Common Prayer offers a dense and intricate survey of the prayer book as a product of both Protestant reform and Renaissance literature and as a political instrument and an agent for private grace. He situates the prayer book and his own study in the different worlds of religious history and literary the...
Article
The reformed English Church retained its bishops and its episcopal hierarchy. Yet contemporary evidence reveals perceptions of English bishops as being withholders of Protestant reform and punishers and persecutors of those churchmen who actively advocated further reform of the Church of England. In a challenge to these impressions, this article su...
Article
Alan Ford's new biography of this Primate of the Church of Ireland acknowledges that in spite of the vast scale of Ussher's own learning, which encompassed patristics and theology, Church history and ancient and Biblical languages, Ussher remains best known today for his chronological survey of the world, which led him to date the beginning of the...
Article
Abstract This thesis examines the arguments about bishops and their authority during the post-Reformation period. While modern scholars are aware of bishops as a source of authority and as incurring Puritan displeasure as a so-called Popish Dreg, attempts by defenders of the episcopate to align bishops' authority with reformed doctrines is an under...

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