Marcos Gallego Llorente

Marcos Gallego Llorente
IE University · Center for the Governance of Change

PhD (Cantab)

About

13
Publications
20,995
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Introduction
Marcos Gallego Llorente got his PhD at the Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge. Marcos did research on Palaeogenetics and Ancient DNA. Since 2018, he combines his professional activities as Innovation and Life Sciences consultant with part-time academic and teaching work at the IE University (Madrid) and UCL (London).
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
September 2009 - June 2013
Imperial College London
Position
  • Student

Publications

Publications (13)
Thesis
One of the biggest innovations in human prehistory was the advent of food production, consisting of the ability to grow crops and domesticate animals for consumption. This wide-scale transition from hunting and gathering to food production led to more permanent settlements, and set in motion major societal changes. In western Eurasia, this revoluti...
Article
Full-text available
Ancient genomes have revolutionized our understanding of Holocene prehistory and, particularly, the Neolithic transition in western Eurasia. In contrast, East Asia has so far received little attention, despite representing a core region at which the Neolithic transition took place independently ~3 millennia after its onset in the Near East. We repo...
Article
Full-text available
Ancient genomes have revolutionized our understanding of Holocene prehistory and, particularly, the Neolithic transition in western Eurasia. In contrast, East Asia has so far received little attention, despite representing a core region at which the Neolithic transition took place independently ~3 millennia after its onset in the Near East. We repo...
Article
Full-text available
The agricultural transition profoundly changed human societies. We sequenced and analysed the first genome (1.39x) of an early Neolithic woman from Ganj Dareh, in the Zagros Mountains of Iran, a site with early evidence for an economy based on goat herding, ca. 10,000 BP. We show that Western Iran was inhabited by a population genetically most simi...
Preprint
Full-text available
The agricultural transition profoundly changed human societies. We sequenced and analysed the first genome (1.39×) of an early Neolithic woman from Ganj Dareh, in the Zagros Mountains of Iran, a site with early evidence for an economy based on goat herding,ca. 10,000 BP. We show that Western Iran was inhabited by a population genetically most simil...
Article
Full-text available
We extend the scope of European palaeogenomics by sequencing the genomes of Late Upper Palaeolithic (13,300 years old, 1.4-fold coverage) and Mesolithic (9,700 years old, 15.4-fold) males from western Georgia in the Caucasus and a Late Upper Palaeolithic (13,700 years old, 9.5-fold) male from Switzerland. While we detect Late Palaeolithic–Mesolithi...
Article
Full-text available
Characterizing genetic diversity in Africa is a crucial step for most analyses reconstructing the evolutionary history of anatomically modern humans. However, historic migrations from Eurasia into Africa have affected many contemporary populations, confounding inferences. Here, we present a 12.5x coverage ancient genome of an Ethiopian male (‘Mota’...
Article
Full-text available
Characterizing genetic diversity in Africa is a crucial step for most analyses reconstructing the evolutionary history of anatomically modern humans. However, historic migrations from Eurasia into Africa have affected many contemporary populations, confounding inferences. Here, we present a 12.5× coverage ancient genome of an Ethiopian male (“Mota”...

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