Marco de Pinto

Marco de Pinto
Hochschule der Bundesagentur für Arbeit · Department of Economics

Prof. Dr.

About

17
Publications
3,714
Reads
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83
Citations
Additional affiliations
November 2020 - present
Hochschule der Bundesagentur für Arbeit
Position
  • Professor
December 2018 - October 2020
IU International University of Applied Sciences
Position
  • Professor
May 2017 - June 2019
Duale Hochschule Baden-Württemberg
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
May 2008 - May 2012
Universität Kassel
Field of study
  • Economics
October 2001 - May 2008
Universität Kassel
Field of study
  • Economics

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
How does cost uncertainty affect the welfare consequences of an oligopoly? To answer this question, we investigate a Cournot oligopoly in which firms produce a homogeneous commodity and market entry is feasible. Marginal costs are unknown ex ante, that is, prior to entering the market. They become public knowledge before output choices are made. We...
Article
We analyze the effects of unionization on the decision of a firm to de‐locate internationally. In a model in which home and foreign workers are perfect substitutes and firms have an informational advantage concerning their productivity, the union offers a menu of wage‐employment contracts. Because firms’ outside options (producing abroad) depend on...
Article
In a Cournot-oligopoly with free but costly entry and business stealing, output per firm is too low and the number of competitors excessive, assuming labor productivity to depend on the number of employees only or to be constant. However, a firm can raise the productivity of its workforce by paying higher wages. We show that such efficiency wages a...
Article
Full-text available
Trade unions are often argued to cause allocative inefficiencies and to lower welfare. We analyze whether this evaluation is also justified in a Cournot‐oligopoly with free but costly entry. If input markets are competitive and output per firm declines with the number of firms (business stealing), there is excessive entry into such oligopoly. If tr...
Article
How does an increase in unionization costs, i.e. costs which arise when workers are organized by a union, affect the productivity distribution of active firms, wage inequality and welfare? In this paper, we build a model with costly, endogenous unionization, heterogeneous firms as well as free market entry/exit to analyze these questions. If unioni...
Article
This paper examines the decision-making process of students from an economic perspective to understand the determinants of an individual's willingness to provide effort. Our theoretical model predicts that ability and job market prospects are positive determinants. Analyzing a novel dataset on thousands of German students, however, we instead find...
Article
Empirical evidence suggests that the bargaining power of trade unions differs across firms and sectors. Standard models of unionization ignore this pattern by assuming a uniform bargaining strength. In this paper, we incorporate union heterogeneity into a Melitz (2003) type model. Union bargaining power is assumed to be firm-specific and varies wit...
Article
In Europe’s reformed education system, universities may be forced by law to consider undergraduate grade point average (UGPA) as the primary admission criterion in the selection of graduate students. In this article, we investigate whether UGPA predicts graduate student performance in order to discuss its usefulness as an admission criterion. In ou...
Article
How are unemployment and output affected if wages are set on the sector‐ rather than firm‐level? We take a new look at this question allowing for heterogeneous firms and rent‐sharing motives. Without these motives, employment and output are lower under sector‐level wage‐setting due to higher wage markups (Calmfors and Driffill, 1988). With rent‐sha...
Article
Full-text available
How does a redistribution of trade gains affect welfare when income inequality matters? To answer this question, we extend the [1] model to unionized labor markets and heterogeneous workers. As redistribution schemes, we consider unemployment benefits that are financed either by a wage tax, a payroll tax or a profit tax. Assuming that welfare decli...
Article
Trade gains are unequally distributed; in particular, low-ability workers lose out in terms of wages and employment probability. In this paper, we investigate the impact of redistribution schemes on aggregate and disaggregate variables. To this end, we built a trade model with trade unions, heterogeneous firms and workers. Three redistribution sche...
Article
Full-text available
Trade unions are typically able to convert their industrial power into political power. We show that, depending on the constellation of parameters, stronger trade unions may improve welfare in terms of an increase in aggregate employment and output if they successfully lobby for lower trade barriers set by the government.
Article
Full-text available
This paper analyzes how trade liberalization influences the unemployment rate of workers with different abilities. We refine the Melitz (2003) framework to account for trade unions and heterogeneous workers, who differ with respect to their abilities. Our main ?findings are: (i) high ability workers profit from trade liberalization in terms of high...
Article
Full-text available
We examine the willingness to donate depending on whether “misery” is random generated or self-inflicted by too high demands in bilateral negotiations. We find that randomness has a positive influence on the total amount of donation. In case of self-inflicted “misery” we observe that the subject who may have caused the unfavourable situation receiv...
Article
Full-text available
Ist die Arbeitsnachfragekurve eher steil oder eher flach? Die diesbezüglichen Überlegungen von John Hicks (1932) und Alfred Marshall (1920) haben nichts an Aktualität verloren. Ihre vier „Gesetze der Nachfrage“ sind nach wie vor Ausgangspunkt vieler Studien zur Theorie und Empirie der Arbeitsnachfrage. Ziel dieses Beitrags ist es, analytische Herle...

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