Marco Lanzilotto

Marco Lanzilotto
Università degli Studi di Torino | UNITO · Dipartimento di Psicologia

Ph.D. in Neuroscience

About

29
Publications
5,065
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369
Citations
Introduction
I earned my degree in biology and PhD in neuroscience at the University of Modena. I spent 1 year at Princeton University (Dept of Psychology, USA) working with A Ghazanfar. Next, I worked for 5 years as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Parma, where I investigated the neural basis of action observation (mirror neurons) in the context of several EU-funded projects; more recently, I have been investigating the neural mechanisms of visual awareness. In 2021, I received the Young Investigator Grant from the BBRF to lead a project on the neural mechanisms of facial mimicry in primates
Additional affiliations
September 2014 - present
Università di Parma
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2014 - April 2015
Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2013 - present
Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia
Position
  • The Neural Correlates of Auditory Orienting in Macaque Monkey: A Role for PEEF in Species-Specific Vocalizations Recognition and Head Motor Control.
Education
April 2013
January 2011 - January 2012
Princeton University
Field of study
January 2010 - January 2013

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
Grasping relies on a network of parieto-frontal areas lying on the dorsolateral and dorsomedial parts of the hemispheres. However, the initiation and sequencing of voluntary actions also requires the contribution of mesial premotor regions, particularly the pre-supplementary motor area F6. We recorded 233 F6 neurons from 2 monkeys with chronic line...
Article
Full-text available
Following gaze is a crucial skill, in primates, for understanding where and at what others are looking, and often requires head rotation. The neural basis underlying head rotation are deemed to overlap with the parieto-frontal attention/gaze-shift network. Here, we show that a set of neurons in monkey’s Brodmann area 9/46dr (BA 9/46dr), which is in...
Article
Full-text available
Current knowledge regarding the processing of observed manipulative actions (OMAs) (e.g., grasping, dragging, or dropping) is limited to grasping and underlying neural circuitry remains controversial. Here, we addressed these issues by combining chronic neuronal recordings along the anteroposterior extent of monkeys' anterior intraparietal (AIP) ar...
Article
Full-text available
Significance The anterior intraparietal area (AIP) is a crucial hub in the observed manipulative action (OMA) network of primates. While macaques observe manipulative action videos, their AIP neuronal activity robustly encodes first the viewpoint from which the action is observed, then the actor’s body posture, and finally the observed-action ident...
Article
Full-text available
Others’ observed actions cause continuously changing retinal images, making it challenging to build neural representations of action identity. The monkey anterior intraparietal area (AIP) and its putative human homologue (phAIP) host neurons selective for observed manipulative actions (OMAs). The neuronal activity of both AIP and phAIP allows a sta...
Article
Full-text available
The neural processing of others' observed actions recruits a large network of brain regions (the action observation network, AON), in which frontal motor areas are thought to play a crucial role. Since the discovery of mirror neurons (MNs) in the ventral premotor cortex, it has been assumed that their activation was conditional upon the presentatio...
Article
Full-text available
The action observation network (AON) includes a system of brain areas largely shared with action execution in both human and nonhuman primates. Yet temporal and tuning specificities of distinct areas and of physiologically identified neuronal classes in the encoding of self and others' action remain unknown. We recorded the activity of 355 single u...
Article
Full-text available
Objective. Previous studies demonstrated the possibility to fabricate stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) probes with high channel count and great design freedom, which incorporate macro-electrodes as well as micro-electrodes offering potential benefits for the pre-surgical evaluation of drug resistant epileptic patients. These new polyimide probe...
Article
Full-text available
The pre-supplementary motor area F6 is involved in a variety of functions in multiple domains, from planning/withholding goal-directed actions in space to rule-based cognitive processes and social interactions. Yet, the neural machinery underlying this functional heterogeneity remains unclear. Here, we measured local population dynamics in differen...
Article
Full-text available
Information about objects around us is essential for planning actions and for predicting those of others. Here, we studied pre-supplementary motor area F6 neurons with a task in which monkeys viewed and grasped (or refrained from grasping) objects, and then observed a human doing the same task. We found “action-related neurons” encoding selectively...
Article
Full-text available
Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) is one of the most widely employed techniques for providing causal evidence of the relationship between neuronal activity and specific motor, perceptual, or even cognitive functions. In recent years, several new types of linear multielectrode silicon probes have been developed, allowing researchers to sample ne...
Article
Objective: Application-specific designs of electrode arrays offer an improved effectiveness for providing access to targeted brain regions in neuroscientific research and brain machine interfaces. The simultaneous and stable recording of neuronal ensembles is the main goal in the design of advanced neural interfaces. Here, we describe the developm...
Poster
This study investigates the properties of Mirror Neurons of are Pre-SMA F6 during the observation of a go/no-go reaching-grasping task performed in both the: a) extrapersonal space; b) peripersonal space.
Article
Objective: Drug resistant focal epilepsy can be treated by resecting the epileptic focus requiring a precise focus localisation using stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) probes. As commercial SEEG probes offer only a limited spatial resolution, probes of higher channel count and design freedom enabling the incorporation of macro and microelectrode...
Article
Full-text available
The effect of intracortical microstimulation has been studied in several cortical areas from motor to sensory areas. The frontal pole has received particular attention, and several microstimulation studies have been conducted in the Frontal Eye Field (FEF), Supplementary Eye Field (SEF), and the Premotor Ear-Eye Field (PEEF), but no microstimulatio...
Article
Full-text available
The Supplementary Eye Field (SEF) and the Frontal Eye Field (FEF) have been described as participating in gaze shift control. Recent evidence suggests, however, that other areas of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex also influence gaze shift. Herein, we have investigated electrically evoked ear- and eye movements from the Premotor Ear-Eye Field, or...
Article
Full-text available
Hearing is especially important for most primate species as they live in habitats of dense vegetation that limits vision. Stebbins (1980) summed up the evolution of the auditory system by assuming that earliest mammals exploited nocturnal niches since they were relatively free of many of the large, diurnal, predacious reptiles. Therefore, hearing a...
Thesis
Hearing is especially important for most primate species since they live in habitats of dense vegetation that limits vision. Thus, communication sounds can be used to identify and locate others (Toth & Assad, 2002) and modify behaviours, and sounds can warn the approach of an unseen predator. To detect auditory stimuli with high social meaning, pri...
Article
Full-text available
Evolutionary hypotheses regarding the origins of communication signals generally suggest, particularly for the case of primate orofacial signals, that they derive by ritualization of noncommunicative behaviors, notably including ingestive behaviors such as chewing and nursing. These theories are appealing in part because of the prominent periodicit...
Article
Full-text available
We studied the activity of single neurons in the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) of macaque monkeys as they performed two visuomotor tasks, called the visual fixation task and the visual fixation-blink task. Both tasks involved a sequence of three visual stimuli, red followed by yellow and green. The tasks differed in that the latter one had...
Chapter
Full-text available
In macaque monkeys, area 8B may be considered cytoarchitectonically as a transitional area between the granular area 9, rostrally, and the rostral part of the dorsal agranular area 6 (FC or F7), caudally. This area is anatomically connected with auditory cortical areas, cerebellum and superior colliculus. Microstimulation of area 8B evokes ear move...
Article
Full-text available
In previous reports, we showed the involvement of area 8B neurons in both spontaneous ear and eye movement and in auditory information processing. Audition-related cells responded to complex environmental stimuli, but not to pure tones, and their activity changed during visual fixation as a possible inhibitory expression of the engagement of attent...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Visual awareness arises from reciprocal interactions between interconnected brain areas in the visual system and beyond. But what information can be processed and used to guide actions when visual consciousness is no longer present after damage to the visual cortex? What neuronal plasticity is possible, and what mechanisms determine the recovery of functions after damage to the visual cortex in adulthood? Our laboratory is addressing these questions by combining the most advanced electrophysiological techniques in subjects with focal brain damage to V1.
Project
We are studying social, communicative, and behavioral deficits that affect working and daily life conditions for those with developmental disabilities such as ASD. In relevant regions of the primate brain, we seek to understand the neuronal mechanisms underlying facial mimicry, which enable a person to reproduce another’s facial expressions and thus converge emotionally. The project, in macaques, focuses on two clinically relevant brain regions implicated in emotion processing: the amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex. The team will simultaneously record single neuron activity from both areas and will reversibly inactivate each of them. The objective is to understand how these areas cooperate and coordinate to synchronize an individual’s facial expressions with those observed in others.