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Marco Griepentrog

Marco Griepentrog
ETH Zurich | ETH Zürich · Department of Environmental Systems Science

Dr. sc. nat. (PhD)

About

18
Publications
10,820
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551
Citations
Citations since 2016
14 Research Items
520 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
Introduction
Marco Griepentrog is generally interested in terrestrial biogeochemistry and studies the interactions between plants, soil and atmosphere on a molecular basis. In particular, he is interested in the isotopic composition and turnover of specific biomarkers in terrestrial ecosystems. Thereby, he applies state-of-the-art analytical techniques such as compound-specfic isotope-analysis (13C, 14C).

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Leaf-wax n-alkanes are produced by terrestrial plants, and through long-term preservation in sediments their stable hydrogen-isotopic signature (δ²Hwax) provides useful information on past hydrological variation for paleoclimate reconstructions. However, gaps remain in our understanding of the relationships between the isotopic signatures of leaf w...
Article
Atmospheric CO2 concentration and nitrogen (N) deposition have been altered by anthropogenic activity and they affect global biogeochemical cycles. It is still not clear how these environmental changes influence the storage and cycling of organic matter (OM) in soils, although this plays a key role in the biogeochemistry of terrestrial ecosystems....
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Full-text available
Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and reactive nitrogen (N) concentrations have been increasing due to human activities and impact the global carbon (C) cycle by affecting plant photosynthesis and decomposition processes in soil. Large amounts of C are stored in plants and soils, but the mechanisms behind the stabilization of plant- and microbial-de...
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Full-text available
Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has frequently been observed to increase soil carbon (C) storage in forests, but the underlying mechanisms still remain unclear. Changes in microbial community composition and substrate use are hypothesized to be one of the key mechanisms affected by N inputs. Here, we investigated the effects of N deposition on...
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Full-text available
Density fractionation along with ultrasonic dispersion is widely applied in soil science to obtain distinct fractions of soil organic matter. Density cut-off and dispersion energy are crucial para-meters to yield fractions closely corresponding to their conceptual definitions. Our literature review revealed methodological discrepancies in the utili...
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Secondary forests constitute an increasingly important component of tropical forests worldwide. Although cycling of essential nutrients affects recovery trajectories of secondary forests, the effect of nutrient limitation on forest regrowth is poorly constrained. Here we use three lines of evidence from secondary forest succession sequences in cent...
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A central question in carbon research is how stabilization mechanisms in soil change over time with soil development and how this is reflected in qualitative changes in soil organic matter (SOM). To address this matter, we assessed the influence of soil geochemistry on bulk SOM composition along a soil chronosequence in California, USA, spanning 3...
Article
Rock‐derived nutrients such as calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) are essential plant resources, yet depleted in highly weathered tropical soils, leading to nutrient limitation of productivity or other ecosystem processes. Despite this, substantial amounts of rock‐derived nutrients occur within wood, which raises questi...
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Full-text available
The Congo Basin's rapidly growing population still largely depends on shifting cultivation for both energy and food security. This nexus of population growth and ecological impact will continue to exacerbate landscape degradation in the coming decades. To quantify the effects of land-use intensity on soil nutrient stocks and the functional composit...
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Full-text available
Stabilization of soil organic carbon (SOC) against microbial decomposition depends on several soil properties, including the soil weathering stage and the mineralogy of parent material. As such, tropical SOC stabilization mechanisms likely differ from those in temperate soils due to contrasting soil development. To better understand these mechanism...
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Full-text available
Soil macronutrient availability is one of the abiotic controls that alters the exchange of greenhouse gases (GHGs) between the soil and the atmosphere in tropical forests. However, evidence on the macronutrient regulation of soil GHG fluxes from central African tropical forests is still lacking, limiting our understanding of how these biomes could...
Article
Stable carbon isotope values of fatty acids (>20 C-atoms) (δ¹³C-FAs) have been increasingly used to apportion sediment sources using isotope mixing models. Understanding the variation of δ¹³C-FAs within catchment land uses is crucial for correct classification of sediment sources but it has rarely been evaluated. Here, we assessed the variability o...
Article
Soil erosion by water is critical for soil, lake and reservoir degradation in the mid-hills of Nepal. Identification of the nature and relative contribution of sediment sources in rivers is important to mitigate water erosion within catchments and siltation problems in lakes and reservoirs. We estimated the relative contribution of land uses (i.e....
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Full-text available
Quantifying soil carbon dynamics is of utmost relevance in the context of global change because soils play an important role in land–atmosphere gas exchange. Our current understanding of both present and future carbon dynamics is limited because we fail to accurately represent soil processes across temporal and spatial scales, partly because of the...
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Full-text available
The use of isotopic tracers for sediment source apportionment is gaining interest with recent introduction of compound‐specific stable isotope tracers. The method relies on linear mixing of source isotopic tracers, and deconvolution of a sediment mixture initially quantifies the contribution of sources to the mixture's tracer signature. Therefore,...
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Full-text available
Purpose Compound-specific stable isotope (CSSI) fingerprinting of sediment sources is a recently introduced tool to overcome some limitations of conventional approaches for sediment source apportionment. The technique uses the ¹³C CSSI signature of plant-derived fatty acids (δ¹³C-fatty acids) associated with soil minerals as a tracer. This paper pr...
Article
Full-text available
Gas-water phase transfer associated with the dissolution of trapped gas in porous media is a key process that occurs during pulsed gas sparging operations in contaminated aquifers. Recently, we applied a numerical model that was experimentally validated for abiotic situations, where multi-species kinetic inter-phase mass transfer and dissolved gas...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The overarching objective of my proposed study will be to investigate soil greenhouse gas fluxes and N leaching responses to change in soil nutrient status of two contrasting ecosystems: a nutrient-limited tropical forest and an intensively fertilized sugarcane plantation in Uganda. More specifically, the study aims to: (1) investigate how nutrient limitations affect the processes driving soil GHG fluxes in a tropical rain forest, and (2) quantify how the conversion from natural forest to fertilizer-based sugarcane systems alters soil GHG fluxes, N leaching rates, and nutrient use efficiency along a fertilizer intensification gradient.