Marcela Bucekova

Marcela Bucekova
Institute of Molecular Biology, SAS · Department of Microbial Genetics

BSc MSc PhD in Molecular Biology

About

20
Publications
6,230
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469
Citations
Additional affiliations
November 2018 - March 2020
National University of Singapore
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Heterologous protein expression in E.coli and in baculovirus expression system, biological activities of different proteins present in mosquito saliva. Previously worked on honeybee secreted proteins present in honey and royal jelly and their biological activities (antibacterial, antibiofilm, immunomodulatory, wound-healing, etc.)
Education
September 2014 - August 2018
Institute of Molecular Biology, SAS
Field of study
  • Molecular biology

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
Pine honey is a honeydew honey produced in the East Mediterranean region (Greece and Turkey) from the secretions of the plant sucking insect Marchalina hellenica (Gennadius) (Coccoidea: Marchalini-dae) feeding on living parts of Pinus species. Nowadays, honeydew honey has attracted great attention due to its biological activities. The aim of this s...
Article
Background Honey is considered as a functional food with health-promoting properties. Its potent antibacterial and antibiofilm effects are the major attributes of so called ‘medical-grade honey’ which is topically used for the treatment of burns, wounds and skin disorders. Nevertheless, the current set of honey quality parameters adopted in the Eur...
Article
Full-text available
Honey is a functional food with health-promoting properties. Some types of honey are used in wound care for the treatment of acute and chronic infected wounds. Increased interest in using honey as a functional food and as a base for wound care products causes limited availability of raw honey. Numerous studies suggest that the protein content of ho...
Article
Full-text available
The skin is the largest multifunctional organ in the human body, serving as an excellent barrier against chemical and biological hazards. Skin diseases present a major health concern worldwide, and are caused by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors with no distinctions of either age or ethnicity [1]. Currently, there are a number of therapies used...
Article
Full-text available
Honey is a functional food with health-beneficial properties and it is already used as a medical device in wound care management. Whether ingested orally or applied topically, honey must fulfill the requirements of international standards based on physicochemical characteristics. However, there is an urgent need for some additional standards reflec...
Article
Full-text available
Multifactorial antibacterial action is an important feature of honey; however, its bactericidal efficacy against biofilm-embedded bacteria is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of vitamin C (Vit C) on the antibacterial activity of natural honeys against planktonic as well as biofilm-embedded bacterial pathogens. The antiba...
Chapter
Treatment of bacterial biofilm in the wound is complicated by the mechanisms underlying biofilm growth. Many clinically relevant biofilms are polymicrobial. Furthermore, mixed species biofilms have complementary metabolic strategies for obtaining nutrients and degrading host immune molecules. Therefore, there is an urgent need to introduce novel or...
Article
Honey has successfully been used in the treatment of a broad spectrum of injuries including burns and non-healing wounds. It acts as an antibacterial and anti-biofilm agent with anti/pro-inflammatory properties. However, besides these traditional properties, recent evidence suggests that honey is also an immunomodulator in wound healing and contain...
Article
Full-text available
Antibacterial activity is the most investigated biological property of honey. The goal of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of 57 Slovak blossom honeys against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and investigate the role of several bioactive substances in antibacterial action of honeys. Inhibitory and bactericidal a...
Article
Thermal liquefying of crystallised honey is the most convenient option for beekeepers to fully liquefy honey. A controlled mild thermal treatment is widely used for effective and safe liquefying of crystallised honey. In this study, we demonstrated that thermal liquefying at different temperatures of 45, 55 and 65 °C does not affect the overall hon...
Article
Full-text available
Honeydew honey is increasingly valued due to its pronounced antibacterial potential; however, the underlying mechanism and compounds responsible for the strong antibacterial activity of honeydew honey are still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibition of bacterial growth of 23 honeydew honey samples. Activity of bee-derived...
Article
Microwave (MW) thermal heating has been proposed as an efficient method for honey liquefaction, while maintaining honey quality criteria. However, little is known about the effects of MW thermal heating on honey antibacterial activity. In this study, we aimed to determine the effects of MW heating on the antibacterial activity of raw rapeseed honey...
Article
Full-text available
Royal jelly (RJ) has successfully been used as a remedy in wound healing. RJ has multiple effects, including antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities, in various cell types. However, no component(s) (other than antibacterial) have been identified in RJ-accelerated wound healing. In this study, we demonstrate that keratinocyt...
Article
Full-text available
A variety of honeys have been clinically tested in wound care; some of these have obtained status “medical-grade honey”. Honey-containing licensed wound care products must undergo a sterilization process by gamma radiation. However, even though the antibacterial activity of honey seems not be affected by gamma radiation, no studies have been perfor...
Article
Full-text available
We established and evaluated a polyclonal antibody based competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the quantification of defensin-1 in honey. The assay showed an inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 111.5 ± 15.41 ng/ml with a detection limit of 7.8125 ng/ml. The regaining of defensin-1 in spiked ‘artificial honey’ was between 87.05 and...
Article
A recent study has claimed that honey glycoproteins including major royal jelly protein 1 (MRJP1), the most abundant protein in honey, exhibit strong antibacterial activity at μg/ml concentrations. These were shown to be effective against a broad spectrum of multidrug-resistant clinical isolates. In this study, we investigated the antibacterial act...
Article
Many clinically relevant biofilms are polymicrobial. Examining the effect of antimicrobials in a multi-species biofilm consortium is of great clinical importance. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of different honey types against bacterial wound pathogens grown in multi-species biofilm and to test the antibiofilm activity of hone...
Article
Antibacterial properties of honey largely depend on the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which is generated by glucose oxidase (GOX)-mediated conversion of glucose in diluted honey. However, honeys exhibit considerable variation in their antibacterial activity. Therefore, the aim of the study was to identify the mechanism behind the variat...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
New honey quality marks
Project
Skin is the largest multifunctional organ on the surface of the human body, serving as an excellent barrier against chemical and biological hazards. Skin diseases present a major health concern worldwide, and are caused by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Currently, there are a number of therapies used in skin disorders; however, they pose several limitations such as adverse effects or limited penetration. Nowadays, there is growing interest in identifying novel, low-cost, highly effective, and safe molecules that may be used in the treatment of skin disorders, especially chronic inflammatory diseases of skin, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. One of the potential sources of biologically active agents are the natural products of plants, insects, and animals. Therefore, this Special Issue of Molecules is dedicated to original research and review articles that cover the latest findings about natural products and their preventive and healing properties in the treatment of skin diseases. Studies describing the efficacy of natural products (molecules) and their mechanisms of action in the treatment of skin diseases are particularly welcome.