Marcel Schlechtweg

Marcel Schlechtweg
Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg · Department of English and American Studies

Doctor of Philosophy

About

18
Publications
805
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25
Citations
Introduction

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Studies have challenged the assumption that different types of word-final s in English are homophonous. On the one hand, affixal (e.g., laps) and non-affixal s (e.g., lapse) differ in their duration; on the other hand, variation exists across several types of affixal s (e.g., between the plural (cars) and genitive plural (cars’)). This line of rese...
Article
Quotation marks are used for different purposes in language, one of which is to signal that something has to be interpreted in an ironic way, as in the utterance What a “nice” day! said on a rainy and cold day. The present contribution describes a reading time experiment in which we analyzed the processing and understanding of ironic written senten...
Chapter
The occurrence of phrases inside words poses a challenge for theorizing about the boundaries of the domain of word-formation as well as the architecture of morphology in general. This survey article focuses on phrasal compounds, e.g., over-the-fence gossip, as the most typical and productive set of data and examines the structural characteristics a...
Chapter
The present chapter outlines how the phonetic software Praat can be used to improve the pronunciation of German learners of English in an online-based environment and by focusing on one specific case. Bringing linguistic aspects into the virtual language classroom represents a key aspect in the current approach and functions as the starting point o...
Article
Certain variables are responsible for acoustic differences between phonologically identical forms. One such variable is the frequency of occurrence of items. For instance, words like time and thyme in English are actually not homophonous since the word of lower frequency (thyme) is pronounced with a longer duration than the high-frequency counterpa...
Article
While the clause-final placement of finite elements is usually quite rigid in German embedded clauses, verbal clusters mark an exception in that they allow finite temporal auxiliaries to be placed linearly before the verbal elements they embed. The prescriptive rules of Standard German suggest that there is optionality with respect to the two order...
Article
Full-text available
The alveolar fricative occurs in word-final position in English in different grammatical functions. Nominal suffixes may indicate plurality (e.g. cars ), genitive case (e.g. car’s ) or plurality and genitive case in cumulation (e.g. cars’ ). Further, there are the third person singular verbal suffix (e.g. she fears ) and the cliticized forms of the...
Article
Full-text available
Quotation marks are a tool to refer to the linguistic form of an expression. For instance, in cases of so-called pure quotation as in "Hanover" has three syllables, they point to the syllabic characteristics of the name of the town of Hanover. Cases of this nature differ from sentences like Hanover is a town in New Hampshire, in which Hanover is us...
Book
How language users from different linguistic backgrounds cope with forms of complexity is still a territory with many unanswered questions. The current book is concerned with morphologically and syntactically complex items, that is, derivatives, inflected forms, compounds, phrases and forms related by agreement and examines how these constructions...
Chapter
Homophonous, polysemous and syncretic words, that is, words with an identical pronunciation but a different meaning, are a well-known phenomenon in the world’s languages. In the last three decades, however, a growing body of research has revealed that supposedly identical forms in reality differ in their precise acoustic realization. Several factor...
Chapter
Introduction to the volume
Article
Full-text available
Compounds and phrases have been extensively contrasted on formal and functional grounds in the literature. Much less is known, however, about the cognitive differences between the two. The present article uses this observation as a point of departure and investigates whether non-lexicalized German adjective-noun compounds and phrases differ in how...
Chapter
Full-text available
Prosody variation in general and in English in particular can have different reasons. Complex constructions of the latter language have been hotly and intensively debated in this respect in recent years. Unfortunately, the primary focus has so far laid on combinations that consist of two nouns. Other construction types, such as nominal construction...
Article
Full-text available
Using data from two empirical studies, the present article investigates whether German adjective-noun compounds are inherently more appropriate to function as naming units or kind terms than the corresponding phrases. In the first experiment, it was tested whether subjects prefer a non-lexicalized compound (e.g., Kurzcouch, short_couch) or the resp...
Chapter
Full-text available
The paper discusses the relation between stress and meaning in nonlexicalized English adjective-noun (AN) combinations. Native speakers of American English were recorded in a production study while reading sentences containing AN constructions such as black tram. These items could be interpreted in either a compositional (e.g., a tram that is black...
Book
Over the last decades, it has been hotly debated whether and how compounds, i.e. word-formations, and phrases differ from each other. The book discusses this issue by investigating compounds and phrases from a structural, semantic-functional and, crucially, cognitive perspective. The analysis focuses on compounds and phrases that are composed of ei...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates the memorization of complex lexical items from a cross- linguistic perspective and in the context of the debate about the demarcation between morphology and syntax. For this purpose, we conducted an experimental study in which German, French and English adjective-noun/noun-adjective combinations (e.g. Jungtourist, jeune t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The current paper discusses the lexicalization of complex constructions composed of an adjective and a noun. It is argued that compounds/compound-like constructions are more prone to become lexicalized than phrases/phrase-like constructions. The relationship between lexicalization and the cognitive process of memorization represents a key point of...

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